Posts in: AH112

First Weeks and the Fine Arts Center

The first couple of weeks in FYE Introduction to Art History were packed full of studying artwork with a focus on art from pre-historic times up to the era of the Romanesque in Europe. When we weren’t in the classroom learning historical context and analyzing specific works of art, we took trips to the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center at Colorado College.

On our first trip, Jessica Hunter-Larsen led us to a monumental painting. Our class was tasked with analyzing each aspect of the piece beginning with basic details and eventually finding a possible meaning of the Renaissance work, which featured Mary, Jesus, and Joseph seated in an almost tropical wilderness. Next, we visited the exhibit, “Everyday Extraordinary: From Rembrandt to Warhol.” Here, we all chose one work of art and were asked to spend ten minutes writing down our observations for a “slow looking” activity. For this exercise, we were challenged to look deeply, slowly, and intently, focusing on the details and objects represented in the piece to learn more about how they fit together as a whole. We then shared things we noticed after gazing at the art for the prescribed amount of time – which for me, was an etching by Rembrandt. Due to the small and hard to make out details, I spent much of the ten minutes examining the work up close. I discovered so many aspects of the print that I never would have seen had I looked at it for just a few seconds as I made my way through the exhibit. There were more people and animals in the print than I saw at first glance, hidden from initial view by the print’s small size and the intricately inked lines.

When next we returned to the Fine Arts Center, we were armed with a graphic organizer to guide our individual examinations of what types of elements comprised a visually arresting, cohesive exhibition. We took note of how the exhibit was structured, what types of art work were included, and how the wall text was utilized. We will use what we noticed to inform our own process of curating an exhibition. I chose to examine the Chihuly exhibition because it seemed outstanding to me as a whole. Aspects that fascinated me about the exhibit were the overwhelming emphasis on color and the variety of three-dimensional and two-dimensional pieces. After reading the wall text, I also learned about how some of the pieces were made and their backgrounds.

We have learned so much and have more to come. Now I have to dive into the Renaissance and make some decisions about our exhibit but keep your eye out for more blog entries from my classmates!

– Anna

Introduction to Art History: A Lineage of Historic Interpretation and Beauty

Hi! My name is Conner Darrell, and I’m a student in Introduction to Art History (AH112). In just a few short weeks, this class has taught my fellow classmates and me more about art than we’ve ever known before. Let me set the stage with an overview of just our first week.
 
Our first week’s classes constituted diving more deeply into the content presented in the first four chapters of our enormous Janson’s History of Art textbook. We began at the beginning, so to speak, examining interesting and detailed sculptures of the female form like the Austrian Woman of Willendorf and cave paintings hidden deeply within the Lascaux Caves in France, all the while exploring what these representations could’ve meant in a pre-historic age (an age before written history). Next we travelled into the humble beginnings of modern civilization by examining objects such as the Stele of Naram-sin, which memorializes an Akkadian general’s victory over his mortal enemies in ancient Mesopotamia. Afterwards, we travelled to Egypt where the striking mastaba-inspired and originally white limestone-covered great Pyramids of Giza still sit as the enormous tombs of Pharaohs Khufu, Khafre, and Menkaure. Finally, we were swept to the Aegean Sea to witness the beautifully painted fresco of a male figure flipping himself over a bull while abstract, almost floating, female figures witness this feat from both sides. We also studied the gorgeous ruins of the city of Knossos on the island of Crete, which revealed a structure so large and incredibly designed that the historian Arthur Evans first defined it as a “palace” which he thought belonged to the mythical King Minos.
 
But this is just a simple taste of what has been and will be in store for us in AH112, so keep yourself posted with our blog to discover what other extraordinary and historic artistry we uncover in the future. Finally, stay tuned for more information regarding the unveiling of our class-curated art exhibition later in Block 2!