Field Trips…in a Pandemic?!

At 8:00 am on Friday I boarded one of CC’s coach buses, feeling a sense of excitement I probably last felt in middle school—we were going on a field trip! View of the coach bus that my peers and I took to get to the site of our trip. This field trip had actually been […]

Acknowledgments

I would like to acknowledge the many who have contributed to this amazing time on the ice. My experience on the ice was made possible by Christine Siddoway. A wonderful advisor and mentor, and brilliant professor, Christine has guided me throughout my studies at Colorado College and furthered interests in structural geology, geophysics, and polar science. […]

Last Flight of the Season

The last survey flight was completed on December 3rd. This flight concentrated on an area in the southern part of the Ross Ice Shelf. Travelling anywhere on the shelf requires some work. Although the IcePod remains attached to the lever arm on the plane until surveying ends for the season, the gravimeters are removed from the […]

Our Approach to Studying the Ross Ice Shelf

The Ross Ice Shelf (RIS) is a floating extension of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet that occupies the southern Ross Embayment in West Antarctica, and acts as a buttress to the flowing Antarctic ice sheets. The bathymetry beneath the RIS in West Antarctica controls the circulation of sub-shelf ocean water that may warm the ice […]

The Office

Every morning, I take a ~20 minute shuttle to get to work. We work in a RAC tent… …located on Williams Field (an airfield) so that we have easier access to load and unload our equipment. Our RAC tent is split into two main rooms: the front room is our office space and the back […]

Observatory Hill

After many hours in the RAC tent sitting and working with computers, preparing for and eager to begin surveying, we needed to stretch our legs. I joined a few other ROSETTA-Ice members on a night hike to Observatory Hill, or Ob Hill, as it is commonly called. The trail is steep and partially covered in […]

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