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On The Bookshelf

Live and Let Live By Evelyn M. Perry ’98 Subtitled “Diversity, Conflict, and Community in an Integrated Neighborhood,” this book by Perry, an associate professor of sociology at Rhodes College, shifts the conventional scholarly focus from “What can integration do?” to “How is integration done?” Through examination of life “on the block” in a multiethnic, mixed-income Milwaukee neighborhood, Perry…

Issue: Summer 2017 • Tags:

What’s on Your Reading List, Gail Murphy-Geiss?

We asked Professor of Sociology, Gail Murphy-Geiss What’s on Your Reading List? When I’m not reading sociology, I love reading for my European Book Group at the Alliance Française in Denver. Because only 3 percent of the American book market comes from translations of works written elsewhere, we read from that small portion, focusing on…

Issue: Summer 2017 • Tags: ,

What’s on Your Reading List?

We asked Professor of Chemistry  Ted Lindeman ’73, What’s on Your Reading List? Climbing conditions on Pikes Peak were appallingly nasty on Dec. 31, 2010. It was of no concern to a sane person, but that didn’t apply because I hiked with the AdAmAn Club*, with which I have spent 47 of the last 50 New…

Issue: Spring 2017 • Tags:

On the Bookshelf

“In Praise of Contempt” Essay by Katherine Standefer ’07 Standefer’s essay is featured in “The Best American Essays 2016,” edited by Jonathan Franzen and Robert Atwan. The essay originally appeared in The Iowa Review as the winner of the 2015 Iowa Review Award for Nonfiction, with a judge in that contest noting the essay takes…

Issue: Spring 2017 • Tags:

What’s On Your Reading List?

We asked Associate Professor and Chair of the Philosophy Department Marion Hourdequin: What’s On Your Reading List? I am currently reading a book by Lauret Savoy titled “Trace: Memory, History, Race, and the American Landscape.” Savoy’s engaging memoir describes her relationship to many regions of the United States, weaving her personal stories with those of the land. She recounts her move from…

Issue: Winter 2016 • Tags:

On The Bookshelf

The Innocent Have Nothing to Fear by Stuart Stevens ’74 The protagonist in Stevens’ novel is campaign manager J.D. Callahan whose candidate is Hilda Smith, the country’s first female presidential candidate who is disliked – even hated – by many. She’s running neck-and-neck with an anti-immigrant, right-wing populist. Smith represents the establishment in an anti-establishment…

Issue: Winter 2016 • Tags:

On the Bookshelf

The Cambridge History of the Second World War chapter by Dennis Showalter, professor of history Showalter’s contribution, “Armies, Navies, Air Forces: The Instruments of War,” appears in the first volume of this 2,025-page, three-volume set and provides an operational perspective on the course of the war, examining strategies, military cultures and organization, and the key…

Issue: August 2016 • Tags:

Off the Bookshelf

This request to talk about what’s on my bookshelf comes at a bad time for me. I am in the process of giving away my books, hundreds on hundreds of books. They have surrounded me. I have lived with them, at home and in my former office at the college. They are my habitat. But…

Issue: August 2016 • Tags:

On the Bookshelf

Now and Then Old Worlds Unfurl co-authored by Susan Barney Jones ’76 Jones and co-author Emily Calhoun ask if parallel lives can intersect — then enumerate the ways theirs have: family lives, professional interests, commitment to a public ethic, and love of nature. “We have recognized over the 15 years we have been meeting as…

Issue: April 2016 • Tags:

On the Bookshelf

Now and Then Old Worlds Unfurl by Mary Elizabeth Bradley ’61 Jones and co-author Emily Calhoun ask if parallel lives can intersect — then enumerate the ways theirs have: family lives, professional interests, commitment to a public ethic, and love of nature. “We have recognized over the 15 years we have been meeting as friends…

Issue: December 2015 • Tags:
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