J Henry Fair: Industrial Scars

Summer Dates: June 6 – July 15, 2011
Fall Dates: September 6 – 17
IDEA Space is closed from July 16 – September 5

Artist and an environmental advocate J Henry Fair creates large-format photographs of sites of environmental degradation that simultaneously seduce us with their extraordinary beauty and horrify us with their content. Shooting from airplanes or helicopters, Fair captures images of the pollution generated by paper mills, fertilizer factories, power plants, coal mining operations, and oil companies.

Waste Ash at Coal Fired Electrical Plant

J Henry Fair’s large-format photographs of sites of environmental degradation simultaneously seduce us with their extraordinary beauty and horrify us with their content. Shooting from airplanes or helicopters, Fair captures images of the pollution generated by paper mills, fertilizer factories, power plants, coal mining operations, and oil companies.  To compel the viewer to consider the true cost of resource extraction and industrialization, Fair’s Industrial Scars are lyrically beautiful, featuring dynamic compositions and saturated colors that evoke Abstract Expressionist paintings. Occupying dual roles as artist and environmental advocate, Fair seeks to create “an aesthetic look at some of our most egregious injuries to the system that sustains us in hopes that the viewer will come away with an innate understanding of his or her complicity and a will to make a difference.”

Coal Slurry

J Henry Fair’s photographs have been featured in segments on the TODAY Show, CNN, FOX News, and WDR German TV, as well as in most major publications, including ArtNews, National Geographic, TIME, New York Magazine, Harper’s Magazine, and GQ.  He has participated in group and solo exhibitions at major museums, galleries, and educational institutions around the world. In addition to his artistic practice, Fair supports a number of environmental organizations that share his commitment to changing destructive consumer habits and effecting positive change in our environment. He is co-founder of the Wolf Conservation Center in South Salem, NY, an organization that is dedicated to the protection of and education about the world’s wolf population.  He is a regular contributor to NRDC’s OnEarth Magazine and blogs regularly about art and the environment.  His book, The Day After Tomorrow: Images of Our Earth in Crisis was released in 2010.

Industrial Scars is made possible by support from the President’s Circle and the Colorado College Cultural Attractions Fund

IDEA Cabaret: The World is Our Canvas

IDEA Cabaret: The World is Our Canvas The Post-Studio Practice of Harrell Fletcher, Kirsten Gerdes Stoltz & Richard Saxton
Wednesday, February 23, 4:30pm, Cornerstone Arts Center Film Screening Room

Loosely defined, post-studio practice examines what happens when you take art out of the studio and into an unpredictable world. Through arts projects that are embedded within specific social, physical, or natural spaces, these artists explore the question of where, exactly, we locate the experience of creating and understanding art.

Chinese Calligraphy Exhibition

Chinese Calligraphy Exhibition
February 24 – March 11, 2011, Coburn Gallery
Thursday, February 24, 4:30pm: Reception & Talk by Tamara Bentley
This exhibition features traditional Chinese calligraphy created by students in the United States and China.

JoAnn Verburg: Interruptions

January 28-March 5, 2011
IDEA Space
Edith Kinney Gaylord Cornerstone Arts Center

Note: Closing reception and artist talk March 3, 4:30pm at IDEA Space.

In this new series of photographs, JoAnn Verburg investigates how the intersections of memory and perspective contribute to a sense of place. Focusing on specific human and architectural subjects, Interruptions creates a visual and psychological “portrait” of Spoleto, Italy, an ancient Umbrian city where Verburg and her husband, poet Jim Moore, live part-time. Verburg has exhibited her work extensively in the United States and abroad and was the subject of a mid-career retrospective at The Museum of Modern Art in 2007.

Over the course of many years, Verburg has explored and photographed her adopted home of Spoleto, carefully selecting and frames specific views of the city, such as its steeply angled buildings, hidden courtyards, and narrow passageways. By subtly manipulating elements of focus and perspective, Verburg emphasizes the subjective nature of perception. In an essay on her recent work, Walter Liedtke, Curator of European Paintings at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York has observed, “Verburg has learned that all observation, including the seemingly most objective, is always subjective, selective, slanted, focused, blurred, disconnected, or somehow interrupted.”

JoAnn Verburg received a BA in sociology from Ohio Wesleyan University and an MFA in Photography from the Rochester Institute of Technology. She has held teaching positions at Yale University and the Minneapolis College of Art and Design and is the recipient of numerous honors including: a Guggenheim Fellowship (1986); multiple artist fellowships from the Bush Foundation (1983, 1993) and the McKnight Foundation (1994, 2004); and a Rockefeller Foundation Residency at the Bellagio Conference and Study Center, Bellagio, Italy (1998). She has exhibited her work extensively in the United States and internationally. In 2007, The Museum of Modern Art mounted “Present Tense,” a mid-career retrospective that traveled to the Walker Art Center. The series that comprises Interruptions has been exhibited at the Gibbes Museum of Art in Charleston, South Carolina (2010) and at Pace/Magill Gallery, New York (2009).

Verburg’s work has also been featured in numerous group exhibitions and can be found in permanent collections including the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; The Museum of Modern Art, New York; the National Portrait Gallery, Washington, D.C.; the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York. Her photographs have been published in “Second View: The Rephotographic Survey Project” (1984), “Picturing Eden” (2006), and “Present Tense: Photographs by JoAnn Verburg” (2007).

On Thursday, March 3 beginning at 4:30pm, the public is invited to revisit the exhibition for an IDEA Cabaret event, A Conversation through Space & Time. To mark the closing of the exhibition, JoAnn Verburg and Colorado College professors Peggy Berg (Dance) and Jonathan Lee (Philosophy) will engage in a lively discussion of the themes raised by the exhibition Interruptions.

David Armstrong: The Burden of the Beholder January 26 – February 11, Coburn Gallery

In an era of Photoshop and digital mash-ups, the casual viewer might be forgiven for thinking that David Armstrong’s surreal images are computer-generated.  Armstrong’s seamless collages are created the old-fashioned way – with scissors, a steady hand, and infinite patience.  The exhibition features images and text from Armstrong’s publication, The Burden of the Beholder, created at the CC Press, and featuring poetry from nineteen nationally-recognized writers. On Wednesday, January 26, 4:30pm Coburn Gallery will host an opening reception featuring a gallery talk by David Armstrong and poetry readings by authors featured in the publication.  The reception is free and open to the public.

Active Engagement

Harrell Fletcher: Corentine's Turtle

Read More »

IDEA Cabaret: A Conversation Through Space and Time

IDEA Cabaret: A Conversation through Space & Time
Thursday, March 3, 4:30pm, IDEA Space
Featured artist JoAnn Verburg and Colorado College professors Peggy Berg
(Dance) and Jonathan Lee (Philosophy) will engage in a lively, public discussion of
the themes raised by the exhibition Interruptions. How do we truly come to know a
place? How does physical awareness of a place affect our perceptions?

Senior Art Majors Exhibition


April 28 – May 13, Coburn Gallery
Thursday, April 28, 4:30pm: Artists Reception
This annual favorite showcases a selection of works by Colorado College’s
Studio Art majors.

May Stevens: Crossing Time

Confluence of Two Rivers, 2002-2002.  Acrylic on unstretched Canvas, 80 x 130 inches.  Courtesy Mary Ryan Gallery, New York.

May Stevens, Confluence of Two Rivers, 2002-03. Acrylic on unstretched Canvas, 80 x 130 inches. Courtesy Mary Ryan Gallery, New York.

September 7 – October 26, 2010
IDEA Space
Edith Kinney Gaylord Cornerstone Arts Center

Featuring twenty-three works from the 1960s to present, this small-scale retrospective exhibition presents works from significant junctures in May Stevens’ career.  Stevens has been involved in the benchmark social justice movements of the 20th and 21st centuries and has created art that protests wars, stands up for civil rights, promotes feminism, and decries child abuse.  Now in her eighties, Stevens continues to defy expectations by creating monumental landscape paintings that subtly, yet powerfully, connect her personal experience of loss to larger social and philosophical questions. By bringing together artworks from throughout the artist’s historic career, Crossing Time acknowledges Stevens’ position as an artist of enduring social and aesthetic relevance.

May Stevens, Big Daddy and George Jackson, 1972, Collage on paper, 22 x 27.5"

May Stevens, Big Daddy and George Jackson, 1972, Collage on paper, 22 x 27.5

May Stevens, Forming the Fifth International, 1985, Acrylic on Canvas, 78 x 120"

May Stevens, Forming the Fifth International, 1985, Acrylic on Canvas, 78 x 120

IDEA Cabaret: Pursuing An Elusive Sense of Place


To celebrate the opening of JoAnn Verburg’s exhibition Interruptions, this IDEA Cabaret event will feature a lively discussion on how a sense of place is communicated in the visual and literary arts. Participants include Scott Johnson, Assistant Professor of Art and Steven Hayward, Assistant Professor of English, moderated by IDEA Curator Jessica Hunter-Larsen. Audience participation in the discussion is encouraged!

 
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