Rethinking the Damaged Photograph: Images Altered by Hurricanes Katrina & Sandy


Artist Talk by Visiting Art Professor Hannah Ryan


Thursday, May 2 @ 4 p.m.


Cornerstone Screening Room 131


In August 2005, Hurricane Katrina devastated the Gulf Coast, and among the thousands of structures in its path was the studio of New Orleans photographers Keith Calhoun and Chandra McCormick. Both born and raised in the Lower Ninth Ward, the duo had been documenting the culture of Louisiana for decades, increasingly with an eye toward injustice. As the waters receded, Calhoun and McCormick gained reentry to their studio, only to find everything-from equipment to negatives-ruined. As the city recovered, they embarked upon an innovative process of making prints from the damaged negatives, the resultant photographs impossibly catching and freezing in time this destructive event. Calhoun and McCormick generated a series and entitled it “Right to Return.” The process and resultant images have altered their perception of destruction, and they no longer consider the images damaged.


More Info:


tiny.cc/DamagedPhotos

Posted by kbritton@coloradocollege.edu for the April 29, 2019 digest.

Did you know that the Office of Sustainability has a travel offset calculator that allows you to offset the carbon impact of any ground or air travel you do? The offsets we purchase go toward landfill gas destruction projects in Colorado, Utah, and Oklahoma, which prevent greenhouse gases from entering the atmosphere and contributing to climate change.

Buying offsets is easy – simply input your start and end points and our calculator does the rest! Do your part to combat climate change by offsetting your Spring air and ground travel here: www.coloradocollege.edu/offices/sustainability/resources/travel-offset.html?com

Posted by b_swift@coloradocollege.edu for the April 29, 2019 digest.

Come to the French House from 2PM to 3PM today for the last Café Croissant of the year!
We will have croissants, chocolatines (chocolate croissants), a cake, and some beverages. This is the perfect opportunity to practice your French in an informal setting and to chat with other students! If you don’t speak French, come anyway and enjoy the food 😉

Posted by mbegu@coloradocollege.edu for the April 29, 2019 digest.

If you are leaving for summer break, Please take your bike with you. Your bike will be gone when you return!
On Friday, May 24th at 7 AM, Campus Safety will be cutting locks and removing ALL BIKES from campus bike racks. All bikes on bike racks this day will be considered abandoned property. If you use the bike racks on campus, please remove your bike the night prior and store your bike in another place such as your work space or living area for the day. If you accidentally leave your bike on the rack, you will have 30 days from May 24th to reclaim your bike before all bikes are donated and no longer in our possession. Campus Safety will not be liable for cut bike locks. Contact Campus Safety at (719) 389-6707 with any questions or concerns.

Posted by kdoughty@coloradocollege.edu for the April 29, 2019 digest.

H. Chase Stone Memorial Lecture featuring Claudia Goldin: A Long Road: The Quest for Career and Family

Richard F. Celeste Theatre
Thursday, May 02, 2019
5:00 pm – 06:15 pm

Edith Kinney Gaylord Cornerstone Arts Center, 825 N. Cascade Ave.
Free to the Public: No ticket necessary
Departments: Economics/Business
Type: Lecture
Sponsored by: H. Chase Stone Memorial Fund
A Long Road: The Quest for Career and Family

“In 1963, Betty Friedan wrote about college-educated women who were frustrated as stay-at-home moms, noting that their problem “has no name.” Today, a half-century later, female college graduates are largely on career tracks, but their earnings and promotions-relative to those of the men they graduated with-make them look like they’ve been sideswiped. According to many, their problem goes by many names and has various solutions. We should coach women to be more competitive and train them to negotiate better. We need to expose managers’ implicit bias. The government should impose gender-parity mandates on corporate boards and enforce an equal-pay-for-equal-work doctrine.

Although the public and private discourse has brought important issues and concerns to light, we’re all guilty of forgetting that the problem is enormous in scale and that it has a history. A single company slapped on the wrist, one more woman who makes it to the board room, a few progressive tech leaders who go on paternity leave-such solutions are the economic equivalent of tossing a band-aid to someone with cancer. They haven’t worked to erase the differences in the gender pay gap. They will never provide a complete solution to the twin problems of gender inequality and couple inequity because they treat the symptoms and not the disease. We must unlearn our many names for the problem and travel the long road to see it for what it is.”

Posted by jhartmann@coloradocollege.edu for the April 28, 2019 digest.

Harold D. and Rhoda N. Roberts Memorial Lecture and Symposium in the Natural Sciences
Richard F. Celeste Theatre
Edith Kinney Gaylord Cornerstone Arts Center, 825 N. Cascade Ave.
Tuesday, April, 30, 2019
7:30 pm – 09:30 pm
David Montgomery lecture: “Soil and the Fate of Civilizations: New Motivation to bring Our Soils Back to Life”
“Beyond Climate Change: The Earth in the Anthropocene”
Anthropocene – the current geologic epoch in which human activity has come to dominate the earth’s geological, ecological, and climate systems
Keynote Lecture “Soil and the Fate of Civilizations: New Motivation to bring Our Soils Back to Life”
A MacArthur fellow, University of Washington professor, and award-winning author David Montgomery will present the 2019 Harold D. and Rhoda N. Memorial Lecture in the Natural Sciences. Montgomery’s presentation will examine how ancient civilizations of the world were undermined by soil erosion, and introduce the “Brown Revolution” in soil restoration as a beacon of hope for world societies today.
The Lecture is from 7:30-8:30 p.m. and will be followed by a reception and book signing by Dr. Montgomery in Cornerstone Main from 8:30-9:30 p.m.
A Panel Discussion will be on May 1, continuing the Roberts Lecture Symposium, in Celeste Theatre entitled “Beyond Climate Change: The Earth in the Anthropocene: What We Know, How We Know It, And The Challenges We Face as Scientists and Citizens” from 7:00-9:00 p.m.

Posted by jhartmann@coloradocollege.edu for the April 28, 2019 digest.

Claudia Goldin: A Long Road: The Quest for Career and Family
Richard F. Celeste Theatre
Thursday, May 02, 2019
5:00 pm – 06:15 pm

Edith Kinney Gaylord Cornerstone Arts Center, 825 N. Cascade Ave.
Free to the Public: No ticket necessary
Departments: Economics/Business
Type: Lecture
Sponsored by: H. Chase Stone Memorial Fund
A Long Road: The Quest for Career and Family
Click here for bio of Claudia Goldin
“In 1963, Betty Friedan wrote about college-educated women who were frustrated as stay-at-home moms, noting that their problem “has no name.” Today, a half-century later, female college graduates are largely on career tracks, but their earnings and promotions-relative to those of the men they graduated with-make them look like they’ve been sideswiped. According to many, their problem goes by many names and has various solutions. We should coach women to be more competitive and train them to negotiate better. We need to expose managers’ implicit bias. The government should impose gender-parity mandates on corporate boards and enforce an equal-pay-for-equal-work doctrine.

Although the public and private discourse has brought important issues and concerns to light, we’re all guilty of forgetting that the problem is enormous in scale and that it has a history. A single company slapped on the wrist, one more woman who makes it to the board room, a few progressive tech leaders who go on paternity leave-such solutions are the economic equivalent of tossing a band-aid to someone with cancer. They haven’t worked to erase the differences in the gender pay gap. They will never provide a complete solution to the twin problems of gender inequality and couple inequity because they treat the symptoms and not the disease. We must unlearn our many names for the problem and travel the long road to see it for what it is.”

Posted by jhartmann@coloradocollege.edu for the April 27, 2019 digest.

Harold D. and Rhoda N. Roberts Memorial Lecture and Symposium in the Natural Sciences
Richard F. Celeste Theatre
Edith Kinney Gaylord Cornerstone Arts Center, 825 N. Cascade Ave.
Tuesday, April, 30, 2019
7:30 pm – 09:30 pm
David Montgomery lecture: “Soil and the Fate of Civilizations: New Motivation to bring Our Soils Back to Life”
“Beyond Climate Change: The Earth in the Anthropocene”
Anthropocene – the current geologic epoch in which human activity has come to dominate the earth’s geological, ecological, and climate systems
Keynote Lecture “Soil and the Fate of Civilizations: New Motivation to bring Our Soils Back to Life”
A MacArthur fellow, University of Washington professor, and award-winning author David Montgomery will present the 2019 Harold D. and Rhoda N. Memorial Lecture in the Natural Sciences. Montgomery’s presentation will examine how ancient civilizations of the world were undermined by soil erosion, and introduce the “Brown Revolution” in soil restoration as a beacon of hope for world societies today.
The Lecture is from 7:30-8:30 p.m. and will be followed by a reception and book signing by Dr. Montgomery in Cornerstone Main from 8:30-9:30 p.m.
A Panel Discussion will be on May 1, continuing the Roberts Lecture Symposium, in Celeste Theatre entitled “Beyond Climate Change: The Earth in the Anthropocene: What We Know, How We Know It, And The Challenges We Face as Scientists and Citizens” from 7:00-9:00 p.m.

Posted by jhartmann@coloradocollege.edu for the April 27, 2019 digest.

Take Back the Night, a march, rally, and sexual violence survivor speak out will be happening on Tuesday 4/30. We will gather at Worner quad flag pole at 8 pm and will march through campus to a rally at Hybl Community Center. There will be performances from SpeakEasy and Ellement, as well as student speeches, throughout the march and at the rally. The rally will transition into an open-mic survivor speak-out inside Hybl-allies and supporters are welcome in the audience.

Please know that the entire campus community is welcome at this event. Your communication of support to students who are participating in the event is important and impactful. It is likely that some might have emotional reactions leading up to and following this event, please be understanding and refer them to confidential resources such as the SARC, START, the Chaplain’s office, and the counseling center. This event was organized by START, SOSS, and the WRC.

Posted by cpalmer@coloradocollege.edu for the April 27, 2019 digest.