This week’s 30min offerings: Monday 12:15pm (Emilie), Wednesday 12:15 (Emilie or Kara) and Thursday 3:30pm (Kara or Emilie).
Traditional beginner-level Hatha yoga. Focus is on self-care and body awareness. You can come as you are, no special clothing needed as long as you can sit, crouch and reach up comfortably (looser clothing preferred). All levels welcome. Mats available, but you can bring yours if it’s convenient.

Posted by egray@coloradocollege.edu for the September 30, 2019 digest.

A massage therapist will be on campus most Wednesdays. Employees may book chair massages in increments of 15 minutes ($1/minute).

If you want to try a chair massage, follow these easy steps to sign-up:

1. Copy and paste this link into your nam04.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.schedulicity.com%2Fscheduling%2FBITYMF&data=02%7C01%7CStaffDigest%40coloradocollege.edu%7Cb7cf0446269b4c4a210608d744f27f05%7Ccfc7b13c12…
2. Select the “Schedule Now” button on the right
3. Select the service you want at bottom, for example “15 Minute Massage”
4. Choose your facility location on the right (Colorado College)
5. Select the date on the calendar that you would like to schedule
6. Select the time that you would like to schedule
7. Follow a few simple registration steps to create your profile
8. Click the orange “Book It” button
9. You will receive a confirmation email and reminder about your
appointment

The cost is $1/minute (15 minute minimum). The massage therapists will take
payment day of massage and they take cash/check/credit cards.

If you book a massage, it will be in the Worner Building, Room #215.

Please note that this is provided as a convenience for employees and massage time is not paid work time.

Posted by lmozingo@coloradocollege.edu for the September 30, 2019 digest.

Cafecito is back! Practice your Spanish every second Monday of the block with coffee and sweets.
Join us at Windom Spanish House at 3 PM and listen to an informal lecture covering a wide range of topics from the Hispanic world.
On Monday, September 30th, prof. Ángela Castro will talk about the afro-colombian population.

Posted by g_sola@coloradocollege.edu for the September 29, 2019 digest.

Tuesday, October 1, 7:30 pm
Packard Hall
Raven Chacon is a composer of chamber music, a performer of experimental noise music, and an installation artist from Fort Defiance, Navajo Nation. He performs regularly as a solo artist as well as with numerous ensembles throughout the world. This concert features his chamber works, including “Quiver”for solo cello, “Double Weavings” for string quartet, “Asdzáá Nadleehé / Yoolgai Asdzáá” for two sopranos and piano, and “Journey of the Horizontal People ” for string quartet. The featured performers include Solveig Olsen, soprano; Jennifer DeDominici, mezzo-soprano; Susan Grace, piano; Jane Chan, cello; and the Veronika String Quartet. The concert is sponsored by the NEH Professorship and the Music Department, and is linked to the Oct. 2 symposium titled “Music, Modernity, and Native Peoples.” This event is free and open to the public.

Posted by aschumacher@coloradocollege.edu for the September 29, 2019 digest.

Wednesday, October 2, 1:15 PM
Packard Hall
An international roster of speakers will address issues surrounding modernity in Native American/First Nations music. Topics include music in Indigenous activism and social justice movements, women’s voices, Indigenous performance artists, and more. Speakers include Dylan Robinson, Stó:lo First Nation; Heidi Senungetuk, Inupiaq; David Samuels; Anna Hoefnagels; Christina Leza, Yoeme/Chicana; Elyse Carter Vosen; Renee Van Nett, Chippewa; Byron Dueck; Beverley Diamond; and Trevor Reed, Hopi.

Posted by aschumacher@coloradocollege.edu for the September 29, 2019 digest.

“What’s not to like about knots? An introduction to the study of knot theory”

Knots have been around since the beginning of humankind, possibly even before that. When we look around us today, knots are everywhere: in the laces on our shoes, the fabric making up our clothes, in our art, and the list goes on. Due to their ubiquitous presence in our world, it is not surprising then that mathematicians decided to study knots. One of the key ideas in knot theory is to decide if we could deform one knot to look like another, seemingly different, knot. Answering this question can be very difficult and it is where mathematics can help. In this talk, we will introduce some of the basic concepts in knot theory and highlight work I have done with CC undergraduates in the area of polynomial knot invariants.

10/8/19 Gaylord Hall – Family style lunch provided

11:45am Doors Open and lunch on tables
12:15pm Talk begins
1:15pm Event Concludes

Click link to register: tiny.cc/Facultylunch2

Posted by jhartmann@coloradocollege.edu for the September 28, 2019 digest.

Friday, October 11, 12:30 p.m., Worner Center room 216. For faculty and staff. Please contact Victoria Levine by email by September 27 if you would like to attend the luncheon, and a copy of the book will be delivered to your office. For our first gathering of the year we will read Music and Modernity among First Peoples of North America, edited by Victoria Levine and Dylan Robinson. The book connects to the concert of Raven Chacon’s chamber music (October 1, 7:30 p.m., Packard Hall) and to the symposium, “Music, Modernity, and Native Peoples” (October 2, 1:15 p.m., Packard Hall).

Posted by aschumacher@coloradocollege.edu for the September 28, 2019 digest.

Tuesday, October 1, 7:30 pm
Packard Hall
Raven Chacon is a composer of chamber music, a performer of experimental noise music, and an installation artist from Fort Defiance, Navajo Nation. He performs regularly as a solo artist as well as with numerous ensembles throughout the world. This concert features his chamber works, including “Quiver”for solo cello, “Double Weavings” for string quartet, “Asdzáá Nadleehé / Yoolgai Asdzáá” for two sopranos and piano, and “Journey of the Horizontal People ” for string quartet. The featured performers include Solveig Olsen, soprano; Jennifer DeDominici, mezzo-soprano; Susan Grace, piano; Jane Chan, cello; and the Veronika String Quartet. The concert is sponsored by the NEH Professorship and the Music Department, and is linked to the Oct. 2 symposium titled “Music, Modernity, and Native Peoples.” This event is free and open to the public.

Posted by aschumacher@coloradocollege.edu for the September 28, 2019 digest.

Wednesday, October 2, 1:15 PM
Packard Hall
An international roster of speakers will address issues surrounding modernity in Native American/First Nations music. Topics include music in Indigenous activism and social justice movements, women’s voices, Indigenous performance artists, and more. Speakers include Dylan Robinson, Stó:lo First Nation; Heidi Senungetuk, Inupiaq; David Samuels; Anna Hoefnagels; Christina Leza, Yoeme/Chicana; Elyse Carter Vosen; Renee Van Nett, Chippewa; Byron Dueck; Beverley Diamond; and Trevor Reed, Hopi.

Posted by aschumacher@coloradocollege.edu for the September 28, 2019 digest.

Next Thursday, October 3rd, 12:15pm, South Hall Commons
LUNCH WILL BE PROVIDED!!!
Today in Mongolia young women and men are engaged via Facebook, hold cell phones, use cool apps.well.to sell dry toilets!. to off-grid communities of many cities and towns of Mongolia and even to nomadic herders. Not only their parents, but also their teachers could not comprehend that doing business on waterless toilets could be something a Mongolian man or woman can handle psychologically given the prejudice against even saying the word toilet (jorlon). With over 600,000 families urgently needing to change their dark, dangerous, dirty outdoor latrines, selling/installing/servicing toilets is a fast growing new business in one of the coldest countries in Asia. The start of such a new business is the result of a 23 month-long public education campaign, Let’s Change Our Toilets, led by Local Solutions, an Ulaanbaatar based NGO. Just two years ago, the word toilet in Mongolian language was a taboo and there was a strong prejudice against anything related to toilets in off-grid areas.

As the initiator and the leader of the campaign, author of the book, Let’s Change Our Toilet, Oyungerel Tsedevdamba will tell her story of breaking the taboo, undertaking a nationwide training on toilets, changing behaviors, and supporting the first ever toilet business cluster in Mongolia.

Posted by jpauls@coloradocollege.edu for the September 28, 2019 digest.