Taught at the FAC Museum, this course considers museum history, philosophy and operations, exhibition planning, design, interpretation, and conservation. Students will explore the modern museum while undertaking projects relating to collections research, exhibition development, and object interpretation. The course includes field trips to museums. No prerequisite.Instructor: Erin Elder, Independent Curator www.erinelder.com

Posted by escally@coloradocollege.edu for the September 28, 2017 digest.

4TH BLOCK
Taught at the FAC Museum, this course examines the origins of museums and their collections, the acquisition, preservation, and display of museum collections and how they reflect shifting ethical, political, and philosophical priorities, cultural values, and ideologies. The course includes field trips to museums.
Prerequisite: One of the following: Art History 100, Art History 112, Art History 113, Anthropology 101, Anthropology 102, Anthropology 103, History 105, Southwest Studies 175, or COI.
Instructor: Laurel Bradley

Posted by escally@coloradocollege.edu for the September 28, 2017 digest.

4TH BLOCK
Taught at the FAC Museum, this course examines the origins of museums and their collections, the acquisition, preservation, and display of museum collections and how they reflect shifting ethical, political, and philosophical priorities, cultural values, and ideologies. The course includes field trips to museums.
Prerequisite: One of the following: Art History 100, Art History 112, Art History 113, Anthropology 101, Anthropology 102, Anthropology 103, History 105, Southwest Studies 175, or COI.
Instructor: Laurel Bradley

Posted by escally@coloradocollege.edu for the September 28, 2017 digest.

An introductory workshop for writers aiming to learn the skills necessary to turn a story, idea, concept or treatment into a television series. We’ll discuss story, character development, structure, and what makes a compelling series. We will workshop participants’ pitches for original stories, outlines and first draft episodes while developing skills as editors and critics. Taught by visiting lecturer Peter Behrens.

Posted by ppyne@coloradocollege.edu for the September 28, 2017 digest.

FS232/FM200: The Films of Alfred Hitchcock. This class, taught by Prof. George Butte, will study the greatest of Hitchcock’s 52 films, from his comedies (like To Catch a Thief and North by Northwest) to his tragedies (Vertigo), from his early British films (Blackmail) and his masterpieces of the 40’s (like Notorious), 50’s (Rear Window), to his late period (Psycho, The Birds, and Marnie: what Robin Wood called Hitchcock’s “trilogy of despair”).

Posted by ppyne@coloradocollege.edu for the September 28, 2017 digest.

The Education Department is offering a new course in Block 8.
ED250: Education in Latin American Countries. Course description:

Education Policy in Latin American Countries examines the most prevalent education reforms that have taken place in the continent. Based on country specific case studies, we will explore issues of: bilingual education in Guatemala, indigenous and intercultural education in Bolivia, student lead movements in Chile, critical pedagogy in Brazil, environmental justice education in Honduras, teacher colleges advocacy in Mexico and, the privatization of higher education in Argentina. Each case study will provide the opportunity to review the socio-political and historical context of the country and link it to today’s globalized world.

Open to all students

Posted by mwhitaker@coloradocollege.edu for the September 28, 2017 digest.

History course that speaks to today! HY287 Enlightenment Culture – Block 8

Tip Ragan will teach a course in the History Department – Enlightenment Culture.

This course focuses on eighteenth-century Europe, the purported birth of “modernity.” During this period, intellectuals argued that they were living in a period of “Enlightenment.” Were they right? Was the Enlightenment the birthplace of meritocracy, toleration, and freedom, as some have argued, or was it rather the precursor of intellectual rigidity, modern racism and anti-Semitism, and totalitarianism, as others have maintained? Does it even make sense to discuss it as a coherent movement? What can-or should-we take from the Enlightenment to understand the contradictions and challenges posed by Modernity and Postmodernism? All student invited to sign up, and first years particularly welcome!

Posted by jpopiel@coloradocollege.edu for the September 28, 2017 digest.