Motivation vs. Procrastination while Distance Learning

In my personal experience, it can be difficult to be productive while both distance learning and social distancing in tandem. The illusion of a purgatory-like free-time can curtail my motivation, but luckily I have begun to develop strategies to fight against my urge to procrastinate while weathering the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

I start every day by writing a to-do list. Even if I don’t get everything done, it is satisfying to cross tasks off and to go to sleep at night knowing I did something important with my day. I’m not claiming I’m productive every day—I certainly was not during the block break between Block 7 and Block 8—but at worst I can at least pat myself on the back for washing dishes or for calling about a prescription refill. I also write these to-do lists because I realized that the fantasy of a busy schedule keeps me more productive than the illusion of a bottomless vat of free-time, so I recommend recording to-dos to those struggling to self-motivate during this unprecedented era.

 

I try to complete the most unappealing tasks on my to-do list first, which allows me to tackle the most difficult parts of my day head-on when I’m feeling most energetic and refreshed. I wish I could say I always stick to this strategy, but self-discipline during the shelter-in-place era is certainly an aspiration that is difficult to achieve.

 

That being said, procrastination is not always a negative phenomenon. Adam Grant wrote an article titled “Why I Taught Myself to Procrastinate” for The New York Times. Procrastinators are often creative, which supports Grant’s assertion that “procrastination encourage[s] divergent thinking.” Upon self-reflection, my identity—poet, artist, and, admittedly, procrastinator—also support’s Grant’s theory. I think that procrastination allows me to ruminate on projects. As I ruminate, my mind wanders, and I consequently create more unusual or complex products.

 

Don’t get me wrong, I am certainly not advocating for procrastination. I work hard to satisfy both deadlines and requirements, and I think that’s an important part of being a student and/or employee. However, I think it’s important to avoid framing procrastination as solely shameful, because, managed wisely, the urge to procrastinate can be a creative tool.

 

 

 

 

 

Source:

https://www.nytimes.com/2016/01/17/opinion/sunday/why-i-taught-myself-to-procrastinate.html?_r=0

Molly Seaman

I am a young poet, copy editor, and social media marketing specialist with an interest in any career that will allow me to use my abilities with words and with people in order to effect positive change in the daily lives of others. In 2018, my freshman year at Colorado College, I secured a job as the Social Media Intern for my school’s Communications Department. For the past three years, I have learned how to market the school I love so much through social media and internet journalism under the guise of Writer and Social Media Manager Laurie Laker. During the Summer of 2019, I participated in an internship with Dzanc Books, which was lead by Editor-in-Chief Michelle Dotter. This opportunity allowed me to practice editing books in all stages of completeness and many levels of quality. I started NGO work in April 2018 when I was offered an opportunity to copy edit the monthly newsletters of Indonesian microcredit organization PPMK (Empowering Women to Fight Poverty). This opportunity inspiring me to begin working with Capital Sisters International in November of 2019, where I strive to build the non-profit’s social media presence from scratch. Founder and Chief Executive Officer Patricia Foley Hinnen, the organization's donors, and the hardworking female clients from all over the world constantly inspire me to challenge myself, to endure, and to champion women. I started working with Lutheran Family Services Rocky Mountains Refugee & Asylee Programs in Summer 2020 as the Employment Services Intern. I was able to accept this opportunity thanks to Colorado College’s Summer Internship Funding Award. I focused on employment services at Lutheran Family Services, which entailed negotiating with employer partners to ensure employment opportunities for the organization’s refugee and asylees clients. I will graduate from Colorado College in May 2021 with a B.A. in English/Creative Writing/Poetry and Minors in French Language and The Book (book arts, history of the book, book structure). I am working on writing and publishing a poetry anthology for my thesis. This poetry anthology will be written partly in French and partly in English, and the thesis will be a physical handmade book completed at Colorado College’s Press using a letterpress and letterpress-like techniques/materials.