Music | Dawn Avery: 50 Shades of Red

6PAN1T1S

Thursday, October 6
7:30 – 9:00 pm
Armstrong Hall, Kathryn Mohrman Theater

Pre-performance reception at 5:30 in IDEA Space
Edith Kinney Gaylord Cornerstone Arts Center
Free and open to the public, no tickets required

From the Sensual to the Spiritual a Multi-Media Show featuring Native American Down-tempo and Avant-garde music, film and dance

Calling on her Mohawk heritage, Grammy nominated, Dawn Avery’s sultry voice, soaring cello lines and powerful stories allow audiences to experience both passion and peace. In her multimedia performance 50 Shades of Red, Dawn Avery combines Classical and Contemporary Native American musical offerings with video and dance to lead the audience through a vibrant artistic exploration of Native experience. Avery’s music is produced and performed by Grammy Award winning artist Larry Mitchell whose expansive guitar textures and electrifying solos elevate the audience to yet another dimension. They are joined by another Grammy winning musician and dancer, Ty Defoe (Oneida/Ojibwe) whose hypnotic eagle dance and captivating hoop dances weave through the journey of 50 Shades of Red.

Dawn Avery has collected awards for her classical works from Duke University, NYU, “Meet the Composer”, among others. She recently completed her doctoral degree in ethnomusicology on Native Classical composition and Indigenous theory. Nurturing future generations, Dawn Avery is a professor at Montgomery College and was awarded the 2012 United States Professor of the Year by the Council for Advancement and Support of Education and the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching.

Sponsored by the Cultural Attractions Fund and the Colorado College Department of Music.

50 Shades of Red
is presented in conjunction with the IDEA Space exhibition, Corollary Acts (August 28 –October 15).

Interactive Conversation | Southwest Alive! Cultural Continuities

Thursday, October 6, 5:30 – 6:30 pm
IDEA Space

bronteorionlrz

An interactive conversation with musician Dawn Avery and Colorado College professor Victoria Levine (Music), and a bead-working demonstration by Tawny Begay.

 

Music | Southwest Alive! Hip Hop Performance by Tall Paul

Tall Paul, Hip Hop artist

Tall Paul, Hip Hop artist

Friday, September 2, 6 – 7pm
Cossitt Amphitheater

Anishinaabe emcee Tall Paul started writing rhymes at age 14. Since then, his Ojibwe-English bilingual work has gained momentum and attention with conscious yet honest lyricism place over only the best beat selection. Tall Paul has been given high praise by popular comic Dave Chapelle.

Programming part of Corrollary Acts in IDEA Space.

Opening | First Friday Exhibition Opening Reception

Navajo Eyedazzler Rug

Navajo Eyedazzler Rug

Friday, September 2, 2016, 5 – 6pm
IDEA Space

Featuring a Southwest Alive! Cultural Continuities interactive conversation between Curator Michelle McGeough and featured artists Dwayne Manual and Marcie Brewer.

Light refreshments will be served.

Panel Discussion | Continuity and Change in Native Arts

Continuity and Change in Native Art: Panel Discussion 

Thursday, September 1, 5:00 – 6:00 pm
Cornerstone Film Screening Room

Exhibition curator Michelle McGeough in conversation selected featured artists and Colorado College Faculty.

Exhibition | Corollary Acts

Corollary Acts

Perpetuate by Jaque Fragua

Perpetuate by Jaque Fragua

August 29 – October 15, 2016
IDEA Space

What do we mean when we talk about aesthetics and aesthetic traditions? 

Corollary Acts brings together the artistic expressions of ten contemporary Native American artists with works from the Southwest Art collections of Colorado College and the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center. Through this combination, the exhibition seeks to demonstrate the continual evolution of artistic expression, and highlight the ways in which artists innovate and adapt new materials and media to espress their own creative visions.

What underlying expectations may we have for Native American art and artists? 

Many museum collections were created at a time when it was thought that Native American peoples and their cultures would not withstand the expansion of settler colonial nation states into their traditional territories and their traditions, and ways of life would be lost forever. Despite the continuous existence and vitality of Native communities in the 21st Century, exhibitions of Native American artworks held in museum collections often continue to foregroud historical conditions, thus demonstrating an underlying belief that Native cultures exist solely in the past. Exhibiting historical work with contemporary artistic expressions of Native American Artists demonstrates the falsehood of the idea of the “Vanishing Indian”.

What qualities make art created by Native Americans “Native American Art”? 

While current critiques of anthropology, art history, and museums view the paring of contemporary Native American art with historical objects as reductive – and therefore potentially problematic — Corollary Acts deliberately engages this strategy with the intention to uncover assumptions regarding contemporary Native American art and to challenge the vary definition of ‘art’ itself. Although this exhibition does not intend to provide definitive answers to the questions it raises, it does extend an invitation to discuss issues concerning aesthetics and aesthetic traditions. And, most importantly, the exhibition provides an opportunity for us to examine our expectations of Native American artists and their art, asking us to consider what constitutes Native American art in the 21st Century.

Featured Contemporary Artists:

Dwayne Manual; Joy Farley; Jaque Fragua; Preston Duwyenie; Marlowe Katoney; Marcie Rose Brewer; Rose B. Simpson; Will Wilson; Diego Romero; Teri Greeves; Virgil Ortiz.

Curated my Michelle McGeough
Sponsored by The Cultural Attractions Fund, the Hulbert Center for Southwest Studies, and the Art Department Stillman Fund for Exhibitions

Opening Reception | reSOURCED

reSOURCED:
Collage and Assemblage Source Material Explored

First Friday Opening Reception
Friday, June 3, 2016
4:30 – 6:00 pm
Extended gallery hours to 7:00 pm

Sport Fishing, Pikes Peak National Seashore

Event Schedule:
Artist talks from all featured artists begin at 5:00 pm, music to follow by jazz guitarist, Wayne Wilkinson.

Collage challenges the confinements of traditional fine arts media, straddles the boundaries of dimensionality, and creates a platform for storytelling and statement. Featuring the works of Kathryn Hart, Jeremy Grant, Susan Goldstein and David Armstrong, reSOURCED highlights the diversity of contemporary collage and assemblage methods. From exploring the visceral quality and rich history of found objects, to creating meticulous composition focused works, each artist represented offers a unique approach to processing and assembling source material. Their works inspire a curiosity for the untold stories of each individual object and image, while effortlessly redefining the intended purpose and context of each integrated element.

 Curated by Lila Pickus
9th Semester Design Fellow at Colorado College.

IDEA Space Summer Hours:
Tuesday – Saturday 1 – 5 pm
Closed July 2 – 4

Exhibition | reSOURCED

reSOURCED:
Collage and Assemblage Source Material Explored

Sport Fishing, Pikes Peak National Seashore

June 3 – July 16, 2016
IDEA Space

Summer Hours: Tuesday – Saturday 1 – 5pm.

Collage challenges the confinements of traditional fine arts media, straddles the boundaries of dimensionality, and creates a platform for storytelling and statement. Featuring the works of Kathryn Hart, Jeremy Grant, Susan Goldstein and David Armstrong, reSOURCED highlights the diversity of contemporary collage and assemblage methods. From exploring the visceral quality and rich history of found objects, to creating meticulous composition focused works, each artist represented offers a unique approach to processing and assembling source material. Their works inspire a curiosity for the untold stories of each individual object and image, while effortlessly redefining the intended purpose and context of each integrated element.

 Curated by Lila Pickus, 9th Semester Design Fellow at Colorado College.

 

 

Performance: People’ s EIS

Tuesday, April 26, 6 pm

Cornerstone Arts Center Film Screening Room

Performance with discussion to follow

Corporate interests cozy to government planning collide with uphill  upheaval in First Strike Theatre’s People’s EIS.  Spoofing an environmental hearing on military expansion, troupers expose Ft. Carson’s history and current reach.

 

EIS

 

IDEA Cabaret: Student Interventions

Tuesday, April 12, 4:30 – 6:00pm

IDEA Space

Bolen_JackpileMine3

Students in multiple courses contributed to the Atomic Landscapes exhibition and related programming. At this IDEA Cabaret, students will present and perform their scholarly and creative work.

IDEA Cabaret: Power & Authority in the Nuclear Era

Nina Elder 003

Tuesday, April 5, 4:30 –6:00pm

IDEASpace

In this IDEA Cabaret, featured artist Nina Elder discusses her lifelong fascination with the nuclear industry in the Southwest in conversation with Dan Miller, Professor of Liberal Arts at the Colorado School of Mines. Elder and Miller will explore the history of the development of nuclear science and the weapons industry in the southwest. The event will conclude with a live electronic music performance by Glen Whitehead that will create a sonic landscape inspired by the nuclear era.

 

Nina Elder grew up in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado and New Mexico where she cultivated a curiosity about gravel pits, mines, and military sites. She earned an MFA from the San Francisco Art Institute and is the founder of the artist residency program PLAND: Practice Liberating Art through Necessary Dislocation and currently is the Residency Director at the Santa Fe Art Institute.

Interested in the intersections between scientific and artistic exploration, Dan Miller has taught courses such as History of Science and Nature and Human Values at the Colorado School of Mines. He received degrees in literature from the University of Colorado-Boulder (B.A.) and the University of Iowa (Ph.D.). Before coming to CSM, he taught at the University of Northern Colorado,North Carolina State University, and Iowa State University.

 

Glen Whitehead is a musician and interdisciplinary artist working seamlessly across musical genres, media and artistic disciplines. Erasing boundaries is his forté from contemporary, classical and jazz performance, to premieres of new works, his own brand of environmental, electro acoustic improvisation & composition, and collaborative composition across Dance, Theatre and Visual Arts.

Lecture: Full Body Burden: Growing Up in the Nuclear Shadow of Rocky Flats by Kristen Iversen

FULL_BODY_BURDEN-final-jacket-3-8-2012-197x300

 

Thursday, March 24,

6:00 – 7:30pm: Lecture Celeste Theatre, Edith Kinney Gaylord Cornerstone Arts Building

Dr. Kristen Iversen’s lecture is based on her critically acclaimed book, Full Body Burden: Growing Up in the Nuclear Shadow of Rocky Flats. Inspired by a desire to probe the secrets that surrounded her during her childhood in a small town near Rocky Flats, Full Body Burden is both a work of autobiographical nonfiction and a thorough piece of investigative journalism. Based on extensive interviews, FBI and EPA documents, and class action testimony, the book presents a detailed account of the government’s sustained attempt to conceal the effects of the toxic and radioactive waste at the site, Dr. Iversen’s lecture will weave together her personal experiences growing up near Rocky Flats with her investigative research into the plant, its operations, and its history, to present a compelling story of the site which was at one time designated “the most contaminated site in America.”

 

 
Page 1 of 1712345»10...Last »
 
 

Facebook

Search this site

 
css.php