On Friday afternoon, a gaggle of school children gathered in the halls of Barnes and Olin Hall for their favorite Friday afternoon activity: science labs. Making excited statements such as “I want to go here!”, the children were in awe of CC’s campus, as well as the CC students that led them through their adventures of the day. One of these students, Ines Siepmann, is a sophomore at CC and bubbles with excitement whenever speaking of Biosciences Outreach club. She wrote about Fridays event, detailing the fun the elementary schools students had.

“Bioscience Outreach Club had their final two events of the year last Friday and this Tuesday, working with elementary school students from Audubon and Jackson Elementary schools, respectively. On Friday, thirty students, grades third through fifth, came to CC for a full afternoon of activities, including four different labs, some explosive and foamy demonstrations, and dinner at Rastall! All students that attended were part of Audubon’s “CC Science Club,” an after-school program at Audubon in which CC students provide lab-based science experiences on a twice a block basis Friday afternoons. This was the first time Bioscience Outreach Club had an on-campus event, and it was a wonderful adventure and success!”

On Tuesday, fifty-five first graders from Jackson Elementary School came to campus to give them a brief depiction of what college life is like, and introducing the concept at a young age. Bioscience worked with them for an hour to show another “Elephant Toothpaste” demonstration, and to learn about basic chromatography through markers, rubbing alcohol, and fabric.”

In the pictures above it is apparent the immense engagement students had with these labs and the CC students that led them through the labs. As Biosciences continues to grow, Siepmann and her peers hope to “continue to maintain a constant, working relationship with our current elementary school, Audubon Elementary, and to continue garnering consistent and excited student commitment (both from CC students and from the elementary school students that attend). Beyond that, we’re looking at a couple different potential growth options — this year, for the first time, we’re having one large, on-campus, multi-grade-level event, which is very exciting! We’re also partnering with a second elementary school to provide a small program for their campus visit. Should we continue to grow and have invested CC students, we plan to potentially look at partnering with additional elementary schools.”

The future of Biosciences is bright as incredibly passionate and dedicated students such as Ines take the lead to expand and improve Biosciences.

 

 

Community Engagement Recognition Awards and Certificates

Every year, our office is privileged to witness our students, faculty and community partners work together to do some truly amazing things. The young men and women we work with use their passion and their intellect to engage with the community in creative and often complex ways to help make this a better place for everyone.  Although we would like to recognize everyone, there are some people in particular we would like to acknowledge. Below are the recipients (1 professor, 1 community organization, and 4 students) of our annual awards , nominated by their peers and selected by the CCE staff.

We would also like to recognize all of the students who have completed the Community Engaged Leadership Certificate and Community Engaged Scholars program.

Congratulations to them all, and we look forward to an even better year in 2017-18!

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT RECOGNITION AWARDS

The following awards and certificates will be presented at a recognition event, on Thusday, May 4th:

 

Awards

Faculty:

Exemplary Achievement in Community-Engaged Teaching

This award honors a faculty member who has artfully woven teaching and learning with community-based work in transformative and innovative ways. Recipients of this award encourage students to make powerful connections between theory and practice, support the development of civic-skill building and civic identity, and prepare liberal arts students to engage as agents of change in a complex and challenging world. Recipient:  Professor Christina Leza


Community:

Outstanding Community Partner Award

This award honors community partners who collaborate with the campus community in partnerships that impact the common good, meaningfully engage students, and provide opportunities for students to learn and grow. By community partner, we mean a non-profit or government agency with whom the campus partners to improve the quality of life of the Colorado Springs community.  Recipients of this award support collaborative initiatives to positively impact social change through reciprocal, sustainable partnerships and contribute to student development through encouraging systems-level thinking, and promote the development of civic skill-building and civic identity.  Recipient: Lutheran Family Services


Students:

Outstanding Engagement with K-12 Youth

This award honors a student in any year, who has done outstanding work in a K-12 education setting. Recipients of this award show an awareness and deep understanding of educational issues, and demonstrate a commitment to fostering the development and achievement of youth. This award recognizes ongoing positive community impact in K-12 student learning and success.  ​Recipient:  Nan Elpers

Exceptional Promise in Social Justice Award

This award honors a lower-division student who shows exemplary promise as a champion of social justice, applying and integrating their liberal arts learning to community-based work in thoughtful, intentional ways. Recipients of this award show a deep and abiding commitment to societal change at the grassroots level, and serve as exemplary models of engagement and empathy, inspiring others to follow in their footsteps. Recipient: Sarah Kang

Award for Outstanding Community Service

This award is presented to a graduating senior who, through commitment to community service, best exemplifies the ideals of a liberal arts and sciences education. Over the years at Colorado College, this student has been consistently dedicated to promoting an ethic of community engagement and involving others in understanding the civic and social challenges of our world. A monetary award, endowed by the Class of 1981, accompanies this award.  Recipient:  Emma Kepes

Anabel and Jerry McHugh Director’s Award

Established in 1996, The Anabel and Jerry McHugh Director’s Award is presented to a graduating senior who has made a significant contribution to the enhancement of the Collaborative for Community Engagement at Colorado College. This award does not recognize the particulars of a student’s engaged work as much as it recognizes the overall effort of a student to promote a culture of responsible community engagement and to promote the CCE. A monetary award, endowed by a private donor and the Board of Trustees, accompanies this award.  Recipient:  Emma Brachtenbach

 

Certificates

Community Engaged Leaders

This distinction honors students who have developed into civic leaders committed to solving complex social issues.  Community Engaged Leaders develop their civic capacities by adopting leadership roles within community-engaged work and implementing a senior capstone project that culminates their college experience and impacts the common good. Recipients:  Jay Hartman, Austin Lukondi, Nicole Tan, Madelene Travis

Community Engaged Scholars

This distinction honors students who have engaged in sustained, informed, and deliberate community engagement.  Community Engaged Scholars have consistently engaged in community work throughout their undergraduate careers and have regularly made an effort to learn from and apply learning to engaged experience. Recipients: Cheryn Aouaj, Ellen Atkinson, Stephanie Bui, Barbora Hanzalova, Emily Kautz, Emma Kepes, Morgan Mulhern, Genia Niemeyer, Rayna Nolen, Madeline Polese, Julia Terman, Maggie Turner, Avukile (Jennifer) Zoya

Keller Elementary Students Treated to College Experience

On April 19th, Professor Marty Slayden (Department of Spanish and Portuguese) and her Spanish 101 class hosted a group of ELL (English Language Learners) students from Helen Keller Elementary.  The kids met in Bemis Lounge and shared stories that the CC students had written in both English and Spanish.  One of the students, Israel Ashiagbor, wrote a very moving story about some children whose father is deported, and yet through their own strength and resilience they end up receiving scholarships one day to Colorado College. He also wrote a song to go with the story and taught the song to everyone while he played it on the piano.

Afterwards, the kids were taken on a tour of campus and played soccer outside of Barnes.  Then everyone went to Rastall for lunch, where the kids got to pile their plates with french fries, pizza and cookies!

Congratulations to Professor Slayden and her students for such a creative and engaging opportunity to incorporate our local youth.  Thanks for letting us share in the adventure!

City Year AmeriCorps Seeks Members

City Year is an education focused, nonprofit organization that unites young people of all backgrounds for a year of full-time service aimed at keeping students in school and on track to graduation. At City Year’s 28 urban locations across the United States and two international affiliates, teams of trained young people called AmeriCorps members serve full-time in schools during the academic year as tutors, mentors and role models. By focusing on attendance, behavior and course performance, which identify students who are at risk of not graduating on time, AmeriCorps members are uniquely positioned to help students and schools succeed.

For more information, click the link below!

AmeriCorps Member One Pager_10.31.16

 

This month in CCE Reads

Privilege, Power, and Difference, written by Allen Johnson, explores the role of privilege in greater systems of oppression as a means to open one’s eyes to their role in eradicating these oppressive systems. Identifying as a sociologist, Allen Johnson situates himself first in his understanding of his own identity. As a “white, straight, male, non-disabled, middle-class”(xi) person, Johnson is situated in various privileged identities and uses that to examine the ways in which his “good fortune” is related to others’ “misfortune”.

In this discussion is an examination of difference. Drawing from black feminist Audre Lorde and writer James Baldwin, Johnson relates that difference has been conflated to mean inclusion and exclusion. Rather, these terms of exclusion and inclusion were made arbitrarily to create a privilege people and a oppressed people. To understand his privilege and the privilege of others likes him, Johnson reiterates that being or having privilege doesn’t not mean there is space outside that privilege. One cannot escape their privilege and therefore be exempt from its consequences. Rather, they are always implicated in their privilege and what is means for others, and therefore in order to change the privilege one is given, one must change the privileges others are not given. Continuing in his argument, Johnson continues to complicate understandings of privilege and difference by drawing the connections to our capitalist economy. Capitalism has had egregious affects on societal order and politics as it is another form of institutional inequality. One consequence of this capitalist system is individualistic thinking, which leads people to believe their problems are not connected to greater social faults but rather due to their own choices and actions. Johnson makes a point to address this individualistic thinking as problematic as it allows people to blame disenfranchised people for their own disenfranchisement. This type of blaming does not allow one to see that individual problems are rather often symptoms of greater social issues. Being able to appreciate this is integral to address systems of privilege and dominance. Throughout the book, Johnson offers tools that allow us to the work of “undoing” the hundreds of years of institutionalizing “patterns of exclusion, rejection, privilege, harassment, discrimination, and violence that are everywhere in this country” (125). Through dismantling widespread myths such as “ It’s always been this way, and it always will” and offering solutions such as “learn to listen”, Johnson concludes with tangible actions every person is capable of doing to work towards a more just society. He points out that as each of us are complicit in our society, we each cannot be exempt from the work it will take to create a better society for us all.

Johnson’s books moves beyond introduction to the world of feminism, critical race theory, and sociology. He offers his perspective as a jumping off point for understanding the ways in which systems of oppression, domination, and privilege work to create the unjust world we live in today. He defines each important term to make it understandable and accessible, so that this information does not remain in the academic world but can rather be understood by any reader. As a white man situated in many places of privilege, Johnson does have some blindsides due to his position(s) in society, but critically examines himself which is an important tenant of this book and the problems this book aims to address.

Quad Innovation Partnership

Want to help Colorado Springs solve the city’s most gripping problems? The Quad Partnership (including CC, PPCC, UCCS, and USAFA) is offering their signature Summer Intensive program in the month of June. Participants will spend a month creating and validating a possible solution to one of the region’s most compelling problems as identified by various major organizations in town. These problems range from addressing homelessness, spreading rooftop solar with Colorado Springs Utilities, or addressing food insecurity in the city. The program is open to current students and alumni within 2 years of graduation, with stipends of up to $1000. Attend the info session next Tuesday, April 11th at 2PM in the Morreale Carriage House. To apply, click here. The deadline is April 24th at midnight!

FORCE / RESISTANCE: Now Open at the Fine Arts Center

From February 27th until September 9th, FORCE / RESISTANCE will be available to the public at the Fine Arts Center on Cascade Ave. The Fine Arts Center, in conjunction with Colorado College’s Race, Ethnicity, and Migration Studies Program, curated an exhibition that “seeks to stimulate dialogue around the complex relationships between systems of power and violence in the United States. The artists in the exhibition address a range of issues including racial profiling, mortality, racially motivated conflict, and legislative oppression.” From Floyd D. Tunson’s “Endangered” series to an original documentary From Standing Rock to Colorado Springs, this exhibition provides us an opportunity to interrogate long lasting social issues through various vantage points. Tunson’s black and white portraits of young black men bring humanity to the misunderstood black boy. Dáreece Walker’s painting on vinyl recreate images of police brutality and resistance. On a black white wall, From Standing Rock to Colorado Springs is projected and testimonies of experiences at Standing Rock are shared by Indigenous professors, students, and activists. These images recount stories relevant to the experiences of many communities as they experience force and resistance from and to power.

For more information, visit the Fine Arts Center website. The Fine Arts Center is open daily from 10am to 5pm. Admission is free for members and those with a CC id, otherwise, it is $15 for adults.  

“Beloved Community Village”: Tiny-home village comes to Denver

In Los Angeles and Seattle, tiny-home villages have spurred up to meet the needs of the homeless community of that city.  In Seattle, 22 furnished tiny homes comprise a village with electricity, showers, and kitchens. In Los Angeles, 40 “micro dwellings” have been built with solar panels and wheels. These micro villages are not only sustainable but comprise a community of care and intentionality. The tiny-homes village in Seattle has teamed with social workers to aid community members in practicing sobriety, finding jobs, and other personal and practical goals. 10 cities across the country have tiny-home villages where communities are cultivated, to give everyone a place to call home, and to offer homeless people some agency.

A tiny-home village is now coming to Denver in the arts district of RiNo. Including 11 homes, a communal space for food preparation, gatherings, restrooms, and showers will provide housing and vital amenities for 22 people. This initiative, named “Beloved Community Village” will be “democratically self-governed with a mission to provide homes for those people experiencing homelessness that will also cultivate community living and self-empowerment”, as stated on the Beloved Community Village website.

Written by the Beloved Community Village are a number of statements that speak to the importance of this project. They state:

Beloved Community Village exists because…

We, as people needing homes, know we can’t keep waiting for someone else to build them for us.
We must take matters into our own hands and create our own home together with compassion, community, and dignity.
We, in solidarity, take the responsibility to build, govern and sustain our village.
We, as people coming from survival on the streets, know the vast and critical need for safe spaces to sleep without being rousted by police or private security and being under the constant threat of violence.
We believe that all people deserve safe sleep
We the village residents will do all we can to provide this for our community.
We envision the world where all people have this basic right to create homes together.

This project centers the homeless and brings dignity to an often “uncomfortable” topic in public discourse. To learn more about tiny-home, visit the Beloved Community Village website or click here to see other tiny-home villages across the country!

Submit a Proposal for a Community Engagement Mini-Grants!

Submit a Proposal for a Community Engagement Mini-Grants!

Apply for a Community Engagement Mini-Grant to support engaged projects this summer or next fall!  Supported by the William P. Dean Memorial Fund, these grants promote initiatives and projects that collaborate with a community nonprofit partner to address the needs of marginalized populations in Colorado Springs or student’s home communities.  The maximum award is $750, which can be spent over the course of one year from the date of the award.  For more information and to apply, click here

Applications due 4th Monday (April 17th) at noon.

Interested in taking a summer course?

Summer Session at CC provides students an opportunity to continue their studies during the summer when campus is relaxed and at an easier pace. We’d like to highlight some courses that would be of interest to students involved with the CCE! These courses include:

Informations on these courses can be found by clicking on the class name above. Many of these classes fulfill the Critical Perspectives requirement! For information on summer session, click here. Be sure to check out how to use your wild card (1 summer block of free tuition!).