Dakini Wisdom: The Five Enlightened Consorts” by Dr. Judith Simmer-Brown

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Friday, May 30, 4:30 – 6:00pm

Cornerstone Arts Center Film Screening Room

Free and open to the public

Associated with the Mandala of Enlightenment exhibition, Dr. Simmer-Brown’s talk will place American artist Joan Bredin-Price’s feminist interpretation of Tibetan tradition in context.

Acharya Judith Simmer-Brown, Ph.D., is Distinguished Professor of Contemplative and Religious Studies at Naropa University, and an Acharya, senior dharma teacher, in the Shambhala lineage of Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche since 2000.  She is author of Dakini’s Warm Breath:  The Feminine Principle in Tibetan Buddhism and Meditation in the Classroom. 

Mandala of Enlightenment: the Dhyani Buddhas & Tara: Goddess of Liberation

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An exhibition of paintings by Joan Bredin-Price

IDEA Space

May 29 – July 15, 2014

This exhibition explores Tibetan Buddhist spiritual symbolism from an American perspective, mixing traditional and contemporary imagery and techniques.  The Dhyani Buddhas series comprises 10 large mixed media paintings that depict the male and female counterparts to the five Buddha families known and used in Tibetan Buddhism as guides to spiritual transformation. In the Tibetan Buddhist tradition, the five Buddhas and their duplicate female consorts are to be studied, contemplated and meditated upon as a method for freeing oneself from the suffering of the human condition. While the imagery remains traditional, Bredin-Price’s paintings are the original work of a Western Buddhist practitioner and artist.  Her renderings of archetypal figures reveal her feminist beliefs by portraying the female in each of the five couples in the same size and stance as the male.

The Tara images depict the premier savior Goddess of Tibet. Tara is considered to be the embodiment of all of the Buddha’s activities. Although two versions of Tara exist in Tibetan Buddhism – White Tara and Green Tara – the works included in this exhibition focuses specifically on the Green Tara.

Sponsored by the Colorado College Cultural Attractions Fund and the Department of Religion.

Revealing the Mandala’s True Colors: Healing by Opening into the Depths of Inclusiveness

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Thursday, May 29, 4:30 – 6:00 pm

IDEA Cabaret Conversation with Dr. David Gardiner and Sarah Bender, Sensei

IDEA Space

Free and open to the public

Using the exhibition Mandala of Enlightenment exhibition as inspiration, Dr. Gardiner and Ms. Bender will discuss ways that contemporary Buddhism is changing America and Americans are changing Buddhism.

Sarah Bender: A Zen Buddhist, Sarah gives talks, leads classes and retreats, and works with individual Zen students at Springs Mountain Sangha in Colorado Springs. Sarah began her practice with the Honolulu Diamond Sangha in 1979 and has studied with Joan Sutherland, Roshi, and David Weinstein, Roshi, since 1997. From 2001 to 2006 she served as the meditation instructor for SMS, and in 2006 became the sangha’s first resident teacher. Sarah was also the Cadet Chapel Buddhist Program Leader for the United States Air Force Academy for many years, and she leads occasional retreats for the Wet Mountain Sangha, in Pueblo.

David Gardiner: Dr. David Gardiner has taught Buddhism and related subjects in the Religion Department of Colorado College in Colorado Springs since 1998. He began learning Buddhism in the late 1970′s at Amherst College with Robert Thurman, and also with Tibetan lamas who lived with Dr. Thurman. This was followed by time in India and Nepal working under Tibetan teachers. He then went to the University of Virginia for his M.A. degree, where he studied Madhyamaka philosophy with Jeffrey Hopkins and Japanese Buddhism with Paul Groner. Dr. Gardiner completed his Ph.D. in 1995 at Stanford University in East Asian Religions. Alongside his work in teaching and research, he gives talks on Buddhism throughout Colorado, maintains a practice based on Tibetan traditions, and runs a non-profit educational Buddhist organization in Colorado Springs called BodhiMind Center.

Sponsored by: The Colorado College Cultural Attractions Fund and the Department of Religion

Double-Header Concert with Hip Hop groups Las Krudas and Urban Verbs

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IDEA Space presents
Las Krudas and Urban Verbs

TICKETS ARE $5

Iywild School, 1604 South Cascade Avenue
Saturday, 5 September, at 7:00pm

 

Tickets $5. Available at http://www.ticketfly.com/event/502717  , at the Colorado College Worner Desk, or at the door

The duo, Las Krudas comprises Cuban interracial couple Odaymara Cuesta and Olivia Prendes.  Their feminist lyrics and performance battle machismo and celebrate the power and beauty of women of color, fatness, and queer sexualities. With few formal political outlets open to young black Cubans, Hip Hop emerged in Cuba as a powerful form of political expression, one that Las Krudas uses to great effect to address the racial and economic problems encountered by black Cubans. Through their lively, engaging musical style, the duo points to issues concerning the politics of race, gender, and sexuality in Cuba. Simultaneously, they unwaveringly advance a feminist agenda in which they seek to politicize the social and economic reality of being black and female in Cuba. Now US residents, Las Krudas call attention to the situation of black women in a social and political context that denies the existence of racism, sexism, status and privilege.

For the performers in Urban Verbs, Hip Hop is more than just a genre; it’s a way of life. Urban Verbs began taking shape in 2005, when Carlos Contreras, Hakim Bellamy and Colin “Diles” Hazelbaker were drawn together by their passions for Hip Hop and slam poetry. The artists wanted to create a new persona for Hip Hop, which is often seen as divisive. “We saw it as this thing that brings people together across generations, backgrounds, class, color, sexuality and race,” says Bellamy. Urban Verbs combines and cultivates the “not so fine arts,” such as street art, installation art, and urban theater. Audiences will find that the show is about more than the type or perfection of the art, as the performers strive to evoke a sense of unity no matter where a person’s passions lie. According to the artists, “Urban Verbs is that place where booties can shake, heads can nod, hands can clap and minds can enlighten by way of experience and execution, passion and practice.”

Systems & Subversions IDEA Cabaret: Pharma-Water

Friday, September 13, 4:30 PM, IDEA Space

 

Jon Cohrs, Alviso's Medicinal Salt Project

Jon Cohrs, Alviso’s Medicinal Salt Project

Featured artist Jon Cohrs and Marion Hourdequin, Associate Professor of Philosophy, consider the practices and ethics of industrial pollution and reclamation efforts.

 

Darkly humorous and provocative, Jon Cohrs’ Alviso’s Medicinal All-Salt project simultaneously examines wastewater treatment systems and the consumer demand cycle created by the pharmaceutical industry. Most of the reclaimed water in the United States contains pharmaceutical residues from humans and livestock. Working in collaboration with Morgan Levy, a water researcher from UC Berkeley, Cohrs distills water samples and bottles the residual chemicals to create a perfect aggregate of what America is taking to heal itself. Presented through “advertisements” that evoke modern drug ads as well as 19th century “snake oil” miracle remedies, the project presents a satiric examination of the medical industrial complex, consumer behaviors, and wastewater treatment methodologies.

Jon Cohrs is a visual artist based in Brooklyn, NY. Often employing humor and absurdity, his work uses public engagement and site-specific interventions to address global issues.

 

Systems & Subversions

September 5 — November 5, 2013

IDEA Space

 Systems & Subversions features several projects that create, examine, and/or disrupt natural and artificial systems.  Featuring both high-tech, digital artworks and low-tech “DIY” inspired projects, the exhibition engages issues of audience co-creation of content, participation, and interactivity. Each piece in the exhibition either creates a system in which the audience may participate, uncovers hidden systems, or actively unravels (or hacks) pre-established systems to achieve other aims. Associated programming and events addressing issues of bio-hacking and bio-ethics and the “fair use” of DNA.

Systems & Subversions
is part of Cross-Creations: Gods & Monsters, a community-wide series of arts events that explore the Gods & Monsters theme from a variety of perspectives. Visit http://www.crosscreationscollab.com for a full list of exhibitions and events.

Featured Artists:

Nurit Bar-Shai is the co-founder and Arts and Culture Program Director of Genspace NYC, a citizens-science community bio-tech laboratory in Brooklyn, NY. As an artist working with biological systems, she addresses the ethics the emerging practice of DIY biology and soft-genetic manipulation.http://www.nuritbarshai.com

 

Nurit Bar-Shai, Sound to Shape

Nurit Bar-Shai, Sound to Shape

Part of her larger body of work Objectivity [tentative], that explores the intersection of art science and technology, Nurit Bar-Shai’s Sound to Shape, Soundscapes installation sets up parameters wherein live microorganisms “grow images” through interaction with variable sound frequencies. The project explores the social life of bacteria by using sound waves to visualize the “chemical tweets” of microorganisms as exceptionally beautiful and rare image patterns. Sound to Shape examines biological systems of self-organization, the immense complexity within seemingly simple structures, and the process of achieving dramatically varied results with slight alterations in initial settings.

 

Jon Cohrs is a visual artist based in Brooklyn, NY. Often employing humor and absurdity, his work uses public engagement and site-specific interventions to address global issues. http://www.splnlss.com

Jon Cohrs, Alviso's Medicinal Salt Project

Jon Cohrs, Alviso’s Medicinal Salt Project

 

Cohrs will present a new version of Alviso’s Medicinal All-Salt, a site-specific project originally created as part of the 01SJ Biennial. Alviso’s Medicinal All-Salt is a unique low-dosage cocktail of our most commonly used drugs, all brought together in one simple salty remedy. Most of the U.S. water supply contains various pharmaceuticals from both humans and livestock. Working in collaboration with Morgan Levy, a water researcher from UC Berkeley, Cohrs distills and bottles the chemicals found in reclaimed water and bottles them to create a perfect aggregate of what America is taking to heal itself. Presented through “advertisements” that evoke modern drug ads as well as 19th century “snake oil” miracle remedies, the project presents a darkly humorous examination of the medical industrial complex, consumer behaviors, and wastewater treatment methodologies.

 

 

 

 

Scott Johnson is a sculptor, photographer and installation artist interested in the relationship between perceptual experience and the ways we map and understand space. Johnson is Associate Professor of Art at Colorado College. http://www.scjworks.com

Scott Johnson, Fairfax Falls

Scott Johnson, Fairfax Falls

 

Johnson’s Systems & Subversions project examines the interaction between human behaviors/systems of belief and natural systems such as weather patterns and hive ecologies.

 

 

 

Graham Wakefield & Haru Ji are the creators of Artificial Nature, a trans-disciplinary research project drawing upon bio-inspired system theories and the aesthetics of computational world-making. Currently teaching Media Arts in Seoul, Korea, Wakefield and Ji are both graduates of the doctoral program in Media Arts and Technology at UC Santa Barbara. http://www.artificialnature.mat.ucsb.edu/home.html

Graham Wakefield and Haru Ji, Infinate Game

Graham Wakefield and Haru Ji, Infinate Game

 

The artists will create a new iteration of Artificial Nature project for the exhibition. Artificial Nature is a programmed, self-sustaining, digital ecosystem that functions as an immersive environment.  In each version of the project, the artists create design parameters in which virtual organisms consume, grow, metabolize, reproduce and respond to activities within an endless fluid environment. For Systems and Subversions, Ji and Wakefield will design an interactive digital island environment that allows audience members to alter how a virtual ecosystem “grows.”

 

 

 

 

Marina Zurkow crosses multiple disciplines with her practice, building animations and participatory environments that are centered on humans and their relationship to animals, plants and the weather. Zurkow is on faculty at NYU’s Interactive Technology Program (ITP), and lives in Brooklyn, New York. http://www.o-matic.com

 

Marina Zurkow, Mesocosm: Northumbria UK, courtesy of bitforms nyc

Marina Zurkow, Mesocosm: Northumbria UK, courtesy of bitforms nyc

 

Zurkow’s Mesocosm Northumberland and Mesocosm Wink, Texas are part of an ongoing series of animated landscapes that develop and change over time in response to software-driven data inputs. The title is drawn from the field of environmental science and refers to experimental, simulated ecosystems, which allow for manipulation of the physical environment and are used for biological, community, and ecological research. Each of the works in Mesocosm is long in duration and recombines perpetually as inputs determine order, density, and interrelationships. They are looped, and have no beginning or end: every time a viewer encounters the pieces, he or she will have a different experience.

 

 

First Friday at IDEA Space and GOCA 121

© Robert Adams, courtesy Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco and Matthew Marks Gallery, New York

© Robert Adams, courtesy Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco and Matthew Marks Gallery, New York

 

 June 7, from 5:15 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.

GOCA 121 and IDEA Space

 

 Begin the First Friday adventure at IDEA Space from 5:15 – 6:30 p.m. with the exhibition A Place Apart: Colorado and the American West, Photographs by Robert Adams. At 5:30 p.m., curator Jessica Hunter-Larsen will give a brief introduction to the exhibition, followed by a poetry reading by acclaimed poet and Colorado College professor of English, Jane Hilberry. A performance in the gallery by musicians featured in the Colorado College Summer Music Festival will conclude the program.

 

Then head downtown to GOCA121 next for an artist talk with Bill Starr, featured in the exhibition DOCUMENTATION, at 7:00 pm, followed by a free concert by Colorado Springs-based musician Alex Koshak. Koshak will perform as part of GOCA and COPPeR’s joint “Free First Fridays” concert series with his newest project Charioteer from 7:30 – 9:00 p.m.. GOCA121 is located at 121 S. Tejon Street (Plaza of the Rockies), Suite 100.

 

A Place Apart: Colorado and the American West, Photographs by Robert Adams. For over forty years, Robert Adams’ photographs have celebrated the beauty of the American West, often focusing his attention on overlooked subjects and vistas: the quiet streets of small towns, the wide-open prairies of the eastern plains, or the unexpected junctures when wilderness and urban development meet.  Inherent in his images is the recognition of the relentless absorption and transformation of nature by human development. The exhibition will run through June 15, 2013.

DOCUMENTATION features the work of three Colorado-based photographers – Matt Chmielarczyk, Bill Starr and Andrea Wallace – and their compelling personal narratives. Artist Bill Starr has for the past 22 years captured movement in dance, theater, performance art and most recently Colorado’s indie/electronic/folk music scene through photography. Starr’s physical and social challenges from living with acute rheumatoid arthritis since the age of nine inform how he observes and translates movement into his prolific practice. Starr’s home has served as a hub and informal artist residence for dancers, musicians, artists, and creatives of all backgrounds, giving the artist opportunity to document many “moments of intensity” through his camera lens. The exhibit is on display through June 29, 2013.

“Voices from Japan: Perspectives on Disaster and Hope

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Perspectives on Disaster and Hope
March 25 — April 6, 2013
IDEA Space
Voices from Japan is a traveling multimedia group exhibition in response to the Tohoku region earthquakes, tsunami, and nuclear disasters in March 2011. The original exhibition, assembled by the Studio for Cultural Exchange, Isao Tsujimoto, Director, was shown in New York in the summer of 2012 at the Cathedral of Sain John the Divine, and included 100 tanka (31-syllable Japanese poems) by 55 survivors of these disasters. The poems were translated by Laurel Rasplica Rodd (CU Boulder), Amy Heinrich (Columbia U.), and Joan E. Ericson (Colorado College). The exhibition also included photographs by Magdelena Solé, photo collages by Saori and Yoshihito Sasaguchi, calligraphy by Kanji Chiba, and a film about the aftermath by Joe Krakora. The exhibit at Colorado College includes many other forms of expression as well, such as calligraphy, photography, film, music and dance performances. The exhibit also contains a selection of poems, photos and a wall hanging by victims of the Waldo Canyon Fire. Despite the calamities in the Tohoku region, the poetry and other arts represent a form of healing from natural disaster. Voices from Japan aims to show the beauty in this art and the ability of the human spirit to overcome obstacles. Presentation at Colorado College is sponsored by the NEH Professorship.
“VOICES FROM JAPAN” EVENT SCHEDULE
   All events are free and open to the public

Monday, March 25, 2013, 4:00pm

Screening of the anime film Ponyo with an introduction by Dr. Susan Napier, Tufts University

Edith Kinney Gaylord Cornerstone Arts Center Screening Room

Ponyo is a 2008 Japanese animated fantasy written and directed by Hayao Miyazaki of Studio Ghibli.

Monday, March 25, 2013, 6:00-8:00p.m. 

Open Reception and Gallery Talk by Professor Joan Ericson

Voices from Japan: Perspectives on Disaster and Hope

IDEA Space: Edith Gaylord Cornerstone Arts Center

Tuesday, March 26, 2013

Witnessing the Aftermath: A Panel Discussion

Edith Kinney Gaylord Cornerstone Arts Center Film Screening Room

Witnesses to the aftermath of Tohoku region earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear disasters share their memories and responses. The panel includes: Colorado College student volunteer, Matthew Beck, Rev. Dr. Jim Peterson, based in Tokyo, and Ibuki Suda, a Japanese teenager who lived and volunteered in one of the shelters after her family had to evacuate their home. 

Wednesday March 24, 2013, 4:00pm

“Voices from Japan” Translated: A Panel Discussion

Edith Kinney Gaylord Cornerstone Arts Center Film Screening Room

Discussion about the tanka poems from the “Voices from Japan” exhibit. The panel includes geologist and poet Dr.Fujiko Suda and the three specialists in Japanese literature who translated the poems into English: Prof. Laurel Rasplica Rodd (CU-Boulder), Dr. Amy Heinrich (Columbia University), and Prof. Joan E. Ericson (Colorado College).

Thursday, March 28, 2013, 4:00pm

Literature in Times of Disaster: A Panel Discussion

Edith Kinney Gaylord Cornerstone Arts Center Film Screening Room

Expression can be the hope found in disaster. This program explores literature written in the wake of disaster. Panelists include: Prof. Laurel Rasplica Rodd (CU-Boulder), Dr. Amy Heinrich (Columbia University), Prof. Jane Hilberry (Colorado College), and Prof. David Gardiner (Colorado College). The program also features poetry written in response to the Waldo Canyon Fire, including poems by Prof. Hilberry and Colorado State Poet Laureate Prof. David Mason (Colorado College).

Friday March 29, 2013, 4:00pm

Geology of the Region: A Panel Discussion

Edith Kinney Gaylord Cornerstone Arts Center Film Screening Room

Discussion focused on the history and state of geology in the Tohoku Northeastern region. Panelists include Dr. Fujiko Suda, Japanese geologist and poet, and Prof. Megan Anderson (Colorado College).

Saturday, March 30, 2013, 3:00-6:00pm

Reconstruction of Tohoku Region: Screening of Two Films

Edith Kinney Gaylord Cornerstone Arts Center Film Screening Room

Co-sponsored by the Consulate-General of Japan in Denver

“Can You See Our Lights? First Festival after the Tsunami”

東日本大震災北夏祭り~鎮魂と絆  

“FUKUSHIMA HULA GIRLS”

がんばっぺフラガール!  クシマに生きる。彼女たちのいま 

These films are in Japanese with English subtitles.

Saturday, March 30, 2013, 7:00pm

Sounds of “Voices from Japan”: Music Concert

Packard Performance Hall

Music performance by international trio, Donna Tatsuki (vocalist), Kanji Wakiyama (pianist, composer), and Claudia Pintaudi (harpist), including the world premier of a song sequence based on a selection of poetry from “Voices from Japan”. A reception will follow the performance in the Packard Hall lobby.

Sunday, March 31, 2013, 3:00pm

Sounds of “Voices from Japan”: Music Concert

Packard Performance Hall

Music performance by international trio, Donna Tatsuki (vocalist), Kanji Wakiyama (pianist, composer), and Claudia Pintaudi (harpist), including the world premier of a song sequence based on a selection of poetry from “Voices from Japan”. A reception will follow the performance outside of the I.D.E.A Space in the Edith Kinney Gaylord Cornerstone Arts Center.

 
 
 

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