Posts in: General News

Michael O’Riley Publishes “Cinema in an Age of Terror”

Michael F. O’Riley, Colorado College associate professor of French and Italian, has recently published “Cinema in an Age of Terror: North Africa, Victimization, and Colonial History.” The book looks at how cinematic representations of colonial-era victimization inform our understanding of the contemporary age of terror. By examining works representing colonial history and the dynamics of viewership emerging from them, O’Riley reveals how the centrality of victimization in certain cinematic representations of colonial history can help one understand how the desire to occupy the victim’s position is a dangerous and blinding drive that frequently plays into the vision of terrorism.

O’Riley also is the author of “Francophone Culture and the Postcolonial Fascination with Ethnic Crimes and Colonial Aura” and “Postcolonial Haunting and Victimization: Assia Djebar’s New Novels.”

Board of Trustees Meeting Actions

The CC Board of Trustees met September 23-25 at the El Pomar Foundation’s Penrose House and conducted the following business.

Swore in newly elected alumni trustee Karen Pope ’70 and young alumni trustee Isabel Werner ’08 (new pilot category).

Voted to approve:

  • A bequest acceptance policy.
  • A resolution formally establishing the presidential search committee and its charge.

The trustees met with over 80 faculty, staff, and students to hear their thoughts on the college’s priorities and challenges and the desired experience and qualities of the 13th president.  Representatives of the presidential search firm, Storbeck/Pimentel, were on hand to listen as well.  In addition, the trustees participated in substantive discussion sessions on diversity and on the liberal arts in the digital age, the latter led by Susan Ashley and David Weddle; attended a reception with local alumni and community members; and dined with the new faculty members and their mentors.

80 Years Later, Original Shove Dedication Program Presented to CC

On Oct. 17, 1930, eight-year-old Bob Funk attended the cornerstone dedication at Shove Memorial Chapel with his mother and two brothers. Funk’s great-uncle, Horace Mitchell, was the grand master of the Masonic Lodge and, as such, was to lay the cornerstone.
Almost exactly 80 years later, on Sept. 10, 2010, Funk returned to CC and presented the original programs to Chaplain Bruce Coriell,

The dedication programs were in excellent condition, despite the turns Funk’s life had taken. He moved to New Jersey, enlisted in the Army, and served in Italy. After the war, Funk worked for duPont before enrolling in Rutgers University in 1951. He later asked a dean at Rutgers to recommend a smaller school, and the dean, learning that Funk was from Colorado Springs, told him CC was one of the best schools in the country. Funk transferred and graduated from Colorado College in 1954 at age 32.

Funk attends St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church in Denver, as does CC Trustee Bill Campbell ’67. When Funk learned Campbell was a CC alum, he asked Campbell to help him return the programs to the college. Campbell helped arrange the September visit to CC, the first time Funk had been back in decades. Funk and Campbell met with President Dick Celeste, toured the Cornerstone Arts Center, and visited Cutler Hall (where both rang the tower bell).

Funk and Campbell also went to Shove Memorial Chapel, where Funk gave the two programs to Coriell, and was presented with a book about the chapel. Funk also reviewed a collection of historical photos of the chapel ceremonies, and was able to find his mother, brothers, and himself in the front row of the guests.

Funk also recalled his impressions of the ceremony to augment the chapel’s records, including the fact that there were two dedication ceremonies. In the morning faculty members led a dedication of the four stones imported from England that are now in the lower part of the front wall of Pilgrim Chapel, located in southeast corner of Shove Chapel. The stones came from a parish church in Gatton, where a Shove ancestor served as parish priest in the 1600s; Winchester Cathedral, which inspired the architect’s design for Shove; Christ Church at Oxford; and King’s College in Cambridge.

Later that afternoon, the Masons led the program to dedicate the cornerstone, which was laid at the northwest corner of Shove Memorial Chapel. It is readily visible on the left as one enters Shove from the main, western-facing entrance. Coriell says, however, that until a few years ago, the cornerstone was obscured by heavy evergreen foliage.

Shove Memorial Chapel was completed the following year, and dedicated on Nov. 24, 1931.

Square Dance Rounds Out Block 1

The beautiful Block 1 weather inspired a group of CC faculty, staff, and students to do some square dancing right in front of Tutt Science Building. The caller, Gregg Anderson, got everyone organized and dancing like a pro in no time (even though some in the group professed to have two left legs).  After 90 minutes of dancing, all dancers received A’s for the knowledge they acquired pertaining to left-hand stars, promenades, and do-sa-dos. Kudos to Emily Chan for organizing the event.

CC Gets $85,000 for Max Kade House ADA-Required Improvements

Colorado College has received an $85,000 grant from the Max Kade Foundation to support ADA-required renovations to the Max Kade House.

Renovations to the house, slated for next summer, include an ADA-accessible kitchen, shower, and lavatory, an exterior ramp, and improved signage. The grant will enable the college undertake the necessary improvements so that the Max Kade House is fully ADA-accessible and usable to people with disabilities.

The Max Kade House, the focal point for an active German cultural program, was inaugurated in 1964 as a residence for Colorado College students interested in German language and culture. Dr. Max Kade was present for the house’s opening ceremony, as his foundation made it possible for the college to purchase the century-old residence.

The Max Kade House also includes a garden house annex for small group screenings, meetings and study groups, and a garden for outdoor activities.

What’s Cooking at the Community Kitchen? A Major Renovation

Colorado College’s Community Kitchen, one of the oldest student-run community kitchens in the nation, underwent a renovation this summer. Gay Victoria, director of the Center for Service and Learning, reports that the changes include:

  • Moving the dishwashing operation out of the kitchen and into side hallway, and adding a rinse station and stainless steel countertops and backsplash
  • Two new freezers and two refrigerators for storing food
  • An under-the-counter commercial dishwasher
  • New slip-resistant flooring in the dishwashing and kitchen areas
  • The removal of all upper cabinets and the installation of stainless steel shelving
  • A new warming oven to keep hot foods hot until served
  • A cold salad server to keep salads on ice until served
  • A new commercial microwave for warming
  • New hanging pot racks to keep pots organized
  • A commercial can opener
  • Two new commercial food disposals
  • New commercial faucets in the kitchen
  • A new hand-washing sink in the kitchen
  • A new paint job, and lots of new trays, plastic glasses, coffee cups, and bowls

Check out all the changes next time you are helping at the Community Kitchen!

No Stiff Upper Lip While Viewing this Jessy Randall Poem

An online poem by Jessy Randall has an unusual presenter: a little kid with a British accent and enough stage presence to assure a successful theater career (even when she flubs her lines).

Randall’s poem, titled “My Friends,” is featured this month on the website Smories, which shows videos of children reading poems and very short stories written for kids.

Randall, the archivist and curator of special sections at Tutt Library, says she doesn’t usually write rhyming poems, but this one is an exception.

“I loved Cricket magazine when I was a kid, and my mom subscribed my daughter to Cricket’s little-sibling magazine, Ladybug, which has poems in it,” Randall says. She thought it would be fun to have a poem in Ladybug, and noticed they seemed to run short rhyming things.

“So I wrote a set of rhyming couplets that I thought Ladybug would eat up. Well, Ladybug didn’t care for them. They sat in my files for a long time.” Eventually, a friend sent Randall a link to Smories and she submitted her poem.

Randall, the author of several books of poetry, says “The key to the humor in the poem, for me, is making the rhyme be a little unexpected. So, if I were doing one for “Jane” I couldn’t rhyme it with “plain” – I’d have to think of something weirder, like maybe “drain.”

To watch the poem being performed, go to: http://www.smories.com/watch/my-friends/

“My Friends”
by Jessy Randall

I have a friend, her name is Claire
She likes to throw things in the air.

 I have a friend, his name is Peter
His room could be a little neater. 

I have a friend, her name is Kate
And she is always, ALWAYS late. 

I have a friend, his name is Lance
Sometimes he does a funny dance. 

I have a friend, her name is Janet
I think she’s from another planet.

CC’s New Student Orientation Trips Promote Friendships, Service Ethic

Colorado College is sending incoming first-year, transfer, international exchange, and international students – a total of 597 students – on a wide range of New Student Orientation trips. The 60 trips, all of which have a service component, will depart Wednesday, Sept. 1 and return Sunday, Sept. 5.

Elizabeth Pudder, service coordinator for the Center for Service and Learning, and Steve Crosby, outdoor education director, are in charge of the trips, with Pudder overseeing 39 front country and urban trips, and Crosby overseeing 21 backcountry trips. All of the NSO trips are led by CC students, with at least two leaders per trip (and more than 100 students on the wait list to lead a trip).

Among the 39 expeditions Pudder oversees are trips to the Koshare Indian Museum in La Junta, St. Elizabeth’s Shelter in Santa Fe, Mission Wolf in Westcliffe, Mesa Winds Farm in Hotchkiss, and a charter school in Taos, N.M.

Crosby’s backcountry trips go to the Collegiate Peaks, Sangre de Cristo, Holy Cross, and Uncompahgre wilderness areas, all in Colorado.

“Most of the trips, whether they are urban, front country, or backcountry, are three to six hours away,” Pudder says. “We want the new students to experience the region.”

The orientation helps new students get to know a small group of people very well outside of the residence hall and classroom, Pudder says. The service component is also a great group- and team-building activity, and underscores CC’s strong service ethic. The time away from campus also allows the new students an opportunity to get to know and ask questions of the group leaders, all of whom are upperclassmen.

The logistics of the undertaking are massive. All the necessary gear must be checked out to be sure it is in working order. Gear is then assigned to NSO excursions, and is lined up in Slocum Commons in order of trip departure. Food for the 597 NSO participants and the 122 student leaders is organized by trip and stored in Bemis Hall. Buses and vans and trip routes must be arranged, with trips heading to the same region sharing a bus to help reduce CC’s carbon footprint.

This is the eighth year that Colorado College is undertaking the massive effort. The Priddy Experience began in 2003 as the result of a $7.9 million grant to CC from the Robert & Ruby Priddy Charitable Trust the previous year. Funds from the grant, one of the largest in CC’s history, were spread across various campus programs, with $125,000  being designated for NSO trips.

Lief Carter to Receive National Teaching and Mentoring Award

Lief Carter, Colorado College professor emeritus in political science, will receive this year’s national Teaching and Mentoring Award in law and politics. This award, given annually by the American Political Science Association and co-sponsored by the Public Education Division of the American Bar Association, recognizes exceptional contributions to teaching of law-related issues from the perspective of political science.

Eric Leonard Awarded $110,866 NSF Grant

Colorado College Geology Professor Eric Leonard has been awarded $110,866 from the National Science Foundation. The award is part of a collaborative grant with State University of New York at Geneseo to develop an understanding of paleoclimates associated with past glaciation of the Rocky Mountains. The results may also provide insight into the reliability of existing climate model predictions of future precipitation changes in the Rocky Mountain region, an area where demand for limited water resources continues to grow. Four to six CC undergraduates will conduct research as part of this grant.