Posts in: Kudos

Winners of Lewis Award for Student Film of the Year Announced

The winners of the Lewis Award for Student Film of the Year have been announced. Arielle Gross ’12 took first place with “Contact: The Eye,” and received a $500 prize. Nick Wellin ’10 took second place for “Showdown,” and received $300. The other two finalists were Connie Jiang ’12 for “Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” and Rachel San Luis ’10 for “Bullet in the Brain.”

The selection committee, consisting of retired Lecturer in Film Studies Tom Sanny, English Professor John Simons, and History Professor Peter Blasenheim, looked at films chosen from the English department’s filmmaking classes as well as the student film festival.

The Richard A. Lewis Memorial Film Award was endowed by Estelle and Barton Lewis in 2002 to honor the memory of their son Richard ’75. The award serves to recognize high-quality student work as well as provide encouragement and support for future film projects. DVDs of the finalists for each year are on file in Special Collections at Tutt Library, and there is a DVD of this year’s finalists in the English department office. To view all the past winners, go to: http://www.coloradocollege.edu/news_events/releases/2010/May%2010/LewisAwardDVDIndex.pdf

Two CC Students Named Rotary Ambassadorial Scholars

Colorado College students Rachel San Luis ’10 and Rakhi Voria ’11 have been named Rotary Ambassadorial Scholars. San Luis graduated cum laude as an English/film studies major and Spanish minor; Voria is an international political economy major and journalism minor.

The Rotary Ambassadorial Scholarship, awarded by The Rotary Foundation of Rotary International, provides a $26,000 grant for a year of study in any university in the world outside the United States. San Luis will spend a year at the Denver School of Science and Technology as a Colorado College Public Interest Fellow before using the Rotary scholarship to study filmmaking abroad. She hopes to study in Prague, Madrid, Barcelona, Vancouver, or Auckland, N.Z. Voria plans to use the grant to pursue a degree in international development at Oxford, Cambridge, or the London School of Economics after she graduates.

The purpose of the Rotary Ambassadorial Scholarship program is to further international understanding and relations among people of different countries and geographical areas. The program sponsors academic year scholarships for undergraduate and graduate students, as well as for qualified professionals pursuing vocational studies. Upon returning home, scholars share with Rotarians and others the experiences that led to a greater understanding of their host country.

Jim Lewis ’79 Nominated for Tony Award

Jim Lewis ’79, a history and philosophy major at Colorado College, has been nominated for his work on “Fela!,” the Broadway musical that has received 11 Tony Award nominations. Lewis and Bill T. Jones were nominated for “Best Book of a Musical,” which is awarded to librettists of the spoken, non-sung dialogue, and storyline of a musical play. The award  originally was called the “Tony Award for Best Author,” until musicals were split from dramas. 
“Fela!” is about 1970s Nigerian musician and political activist Fela Anikulapo-Kuti, and explores the extravagant, decadent, and rebellious world of the Afrobeat legend. The Tony Awards will be presented on June 13 at Radio City Music Hall. “Fela!” is tied with musical revival “La Cage aux Folles” for the most nominations.

Paul Maruyama Publishes ‘Escape From Manchuria’

Escape from ManchuriaPaul Maruyama, a Colorado College lecturer in Japanese in the German, Russian and East Asian languages department, has published a book entitled “Escape from Manchuria.”
The book details the story of Maruyama’s father, Kunio Maruyama, then a 37-year-old Japanese citizen, and his two friends who, together in 1946, devised a plan to escape to Japan from Soviet-occupied Manchuria. The three men personally appealed to General Douglas MacArthur, who was then the Supreme Commander for Allied Power occupying the defeated nation of Japan. The book tells of the courage and perseverance of the three men who eventually brought about the repatriation of 1.7 million Japanese held captive under Soviet occupation in Manchuria. More information about the book is available at: http://www.ereleases.com/pr/son-relates-fathers-role-rescue-17-million-manchuria-33771 and http://www.iuniverse.com/Bookstore/BookDetail.aspx?BookId=SKU-000143858

Center for Service and Learning Presents Recognition Awards

Awards 002The Center for Service and Learning held its service awards recognition dessert on Wednesday, April 28, presenting awards to 15 recipients.
The Annabel and Jerry McHugh Director’s Award, presented to a senior who has made significant contributions to the enhancement of the Center for Service and Learning, was presented to Jennie Vader ’10. Courtney-Rose Harris ’10 was awarded the Class of 1981 Outstanding Community Service Award, and Lauren Jenkins ’10 received the Organizational Leadership Award, which is presented to a student who demonstrates exemplary leadership skills.
Matt Reuer, technical director of EV science, received the Partnership Award, with numerous nominators citing his dedication and work on the international service trip to Peru.
B Torres ’10 received the award for Commitment Beyond the Course, specifically her work with immigration issues along the U.S./Mexico border. Marley Hamrick ’13 won the Outstanding Initiative by a First-Year Student for her work in reinstating the Disabilities Awareness Club and initiating Project Fuzzy, a benefit for cancer patients. Joel Minor ’10 received the Innovative Leadership award, which is presented to a student who has the insight to recognize an existing community problem and the ability to discover and implement solutions. Colin McCarey ’12, manager of the CC kitchen, received the award for Outstanding Commitment to Social Change, and Gail Murphy-Geiss, associate professor of sociology, received the award for Curricular Innovation and her “Justice Watch” program that monitors the quality of judges.
Spirit Awards, which recognize those volunteers whose community service work has had a substantial impact upon one or more volunteer projects, were awarded to five recipients: Jacqueline Danzig ’10, Bridgett Shephard ’11, Amy Markstein ’10, Kristin Sweeney ’11 and Cristina Landa ’11.
The Teamwork Award went to CREATE, a collaborative program that works with 10 girls at Mann Middle School.

Mark Fiore ’91 Wins Pulitzer Prize for Editorial Cartooning

Mark Fiore.Mark Fiore ’91, whose animated political cartoons appear on SFGate.com, the Web site of the San Francisco Chronicle, has won the Pulitzer Prize for editorial cartooning. Fiore was a political science major at Colorado College.
It is the first time since the category of editorial cartooning was created in 1922 that the Pulitzer has gone to an artist whose work does not appear in print. The Pulitzer jury said Fiore’s “biting wit, extensive research and ability to distill complex issues set a high standard for an emerging form of commentary” – online video cartooning. Like traditional editorial cartoons, his work pokes fun at politicians and societal hypocrisy, but Fiore delivers his messages in animated videos that last between 45 seconds and two minutes.
Fiore’s winning entry included “Science-gate,” which adopts the voice-over tone of a mudslinging political ad to lampoon skeptics of global warming. “Obama Interruptus” portrays the president as a focused orator despite the distracting realities of the world around him. “Credit Card Reform in Action” spoofs new credit-card regulations that are as confusing and loophole-laden as any credit card company’s signup brochure.
“What I really try to do is make it accessible, avoid the wonky and have something to say,” Fiore said. “I’d rather get people thinking a little bit (first), then laughing. But ideally, do both.” See more at:  http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/c/a/2010/04/13/MNON1CTHIB.DTL

Tutt Librarian Steve Lawson Profiled in Library Journal

untitledSteve Lawson, humanities librarian at Tutt Library, was featured in Library Journal, one of the major trade magazines for librarians.
Each year the magazine runs a feature called “Movers and Shakers,” in which it profiles about 50 peer-nominated librarians who have been doing interesting things. This year, Lawson was profiled along with his friend Josh Neff, a librarian at Johnson County Library in Kansas. The two started  the Library Society of the World (LSW), which Lawson calls “a sometimes-jokey, sometimes-serious association of librarians.” LSW serves as a way for librarians to join a supportive personal and professional network online. The group has a running chat session on the FriendFeed social networking site and has raised money for the Louisville Free Public Library, which was flooded last year. Lawson and Neff also initiated the Shovers & Makers awards, a parody of the  Library Journal‘s Movers & Shakers. The Library Journal profile of Lawson (and Neff) can be viewed at:
http://www.libraryjournal.com/MS2010Inductee/2140493459.html

Dave Mason, Poem Featured on PBS NewsHour

DaveMason credit AnneLennoxEnglish Professor Dave Mason was featured on the PBS NewsHour on Thursday, April 1, and a few days earlier one of his poems was featured as the weekly poem. Mason ’78  is the author of “Ludlow,” a novel in verse that tells the story of the 1914 Ludlow Massacre in southern Colorado. It was named best poetry book of 2007 by the Contemporary Poetry Review and the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum. Other books include “The Buried Houses,” winner of the Nicholas Roerich Poetry Prize, “The Country I Remember,” winner of the Alice Fay Di Castagnola Award, and “Arrivals.” The featured weekly poem is at: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/art/blog/2010/03/weekly-poem-from-ludlow.html.
The extended interview, which includes two additional poems and three interview excerpts, is featured on PBS at: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/indepth_coverage/entertainment/poetry/

KRCC’s Andrea Chalfin Wins Award for ‘Mise en Place’ Series

Andrea Chalfin, news director for KRCC, Colorado College’s NPR-member radio station, won second place from the Colorado Broadcaster’s Association for “Mise en Place” in the “Best Mini-Documentary or Series” category.
“Mise en Place” is a monthly series based on “Colorado Proud,” which comes from the Colorado Department of Agriculture and highlights a Colorado agricultural product. Chalfin or one of KRCC News freelancers typically visits a farmer and a chef for each one, though there have been variations, including speaking with a CSU-Pueblo professor about the historical significance of squash in the region. The show also provides recipes online, one from the Colorado Department of Agriculture and one from the chef who is interviewed.
“Mise en Place” airs at 5:45 p.m. (actually, 5:44:30) the first Friday of each month, and again at 10 a.m. on Sunday, prior to the beginning of “The Splendid Table.” Be sure to tune in to KRCC 91.5 FM on Friday, April 2, for a story on herbs. To view the series, which often has extra content such as slideshows and audio, go to:
http://krccnews.org/rccnews/category/mise-en-place

Eric Perramond Publishes New Book on Mexican Cattle Ranching

Eric Perramond, associate professor of Southwest studies and environmental science, has published a new book, “Political Ecologies Perramond bookof Cattle Ranching in Northern Mexico: Private Revolutions.”
The book, published by the University of Arizona Press, examines the Río Sonora region of northern Mexico, where ranchers own anywhere from several hundred to tens of thousands of acres. Perramond evaluates management techniques, labor expenditures, gender roles, and decision-making on private ranches of varying size. By examining the economic and ecological dimensions of daily decisions made on and off the ranch, he shows that, contrary to prevailing notions, ranchers rarely collude as a class unless land titles are at issue, and that their decision-making is as varied as the landscapes they oversee.