Posts in: Kudos

Paul Maruyama Publishes ‘Escape From Manchuria’

Escape from ManchuriaPaul Maruyama, a Colorado College lecturer in Japanese in the German, Russian and East Asian languages department, has published a book titled “Escape from Manchuria.”
The book details the story of Maruyama’s father, Kunio Maruyama, then a 37-year-old Japanese citizen, and his two friends who, together in 1946, devised a plan to escape to Japan from Soviet-occupied Manchuria. The three men personally appealed to General Douglas MacArthur, who was then the Supreme Commander for Allied Power occupying the defeated nation of Japan. The book tells of the courage and perseverance of the three men who eventually brought about the repatriation of 1.7 million Japanese held captive under Soviet occupation in Manchuria. More information about the book is available at: http://www.ereleases.com/pr/son-relates-fathers-role-rescue-17-million-manchuria-33771 and http://www.iuniverse.com/Bookstore/BookDetail.aspx?BookId=SKU-000143858

Center for Service and Learning Presents Recognition Awards

Awards 002The Center for Service and Learning held its service awards recognition dessert on Wednesday, April 28, presenting awards to 15 recipients.
The Annabel and Jerry McHugh Director’s Award, presented to a senior who has made significant contributions to the enhancement of the Center for Service and Learning, was presented to Jennie Vader ’10. Courtney-Rose Harris ’10 was awarded the Class of 1981 Outstanding Community Service Award, and Lauren Jenkins ’10 received the Organizational Leadership Award, which is presented to a student who demonstrates exemplary leadership skills.
Matt Reuer, technical director of EV science, received the Partnership Award, with numerous nominators citing his dedication and work on the international service trip to Peru.
B Torres ’10 received the award for Commitment Beyond the Course, specifically her work with immigration issues along the U.S./Mexico border. Marley Hamrick ’13 won the Outstanding Initiative by a First-Year Student for her work in reinstating the Disabilities Awareness Club and initiating Project Fuzzy, a benefit for cancer patients. Joel Minor ’10 received the Innovative Leadership award, which is presented to a student who has the insight to recognize an existing community problem and the ability to discover and implement solutions. Colin McCarey ’12, manager of the CC kitchen, received the award for Outstanding Commitment to Social Change, and Gail Murphy-Geiss, associate professor of sociology, received the award for Curricular Innovation and her “Justice Watch” program that monitors the quality of judges.
Spirit Awards, which recognize those volunteers whose community service work has had a substantial impact upon one or more volunteer projects, were awarded to five recipients: Jacqueline Danzig ’10, Bridgett Shephard ’11, Amy Markstein ’10, Kristin Sweeney ’11 and Cristina Landa ’11.
The Teamwork Award went to CREATE, a collaborative program that works with 10 girls at Mann Middle School.

Mark Fiore ’91 Wins Pulitzer Prize for Editorial Cartooning

Mark Fiore.Mark Fiore ’91, whose animated political cartoons appear on SFGate.com, the Web site of the San Francisco Chronicle, has won the Pulitzer Prize for editorial cartooning. Fiore was a political science major at Colorado College.
It is the first time since the category of editorial cartooning was created in 1922 that the Pulitzer has gone to an artist whose work does not appear in print. The Pulitzer jury said Fiore’s “biting wit, extensive research and ability to distill complex issues set a high standard for an emerging form of commentary” – online video cartooning. Like traditional editorial cartoons, his work pokes fun at politicians and societal hypocrisy, but Fiore delivers his messages in animated videos that last between 45 seconds and two minutes.
Fiore’s winning entry included “Science-gate,” which adopts the voice-over tone of a mudslinging political ad to lampoon skeptics of global warming. “Obama Interruptus” portrays the president as a focused orator despite the distracting realities of the world around him. “Credit Card Reform in Action” spoofs new credit-card regulations that are as confusing and loophole-laden as any credit card company’s signup brochure.
“What I really try to do is make it accessible, avoid the wonky and have something to say,” Fiore said. “I’d rather get people thinking a little bit (first), then laughing. But ideally, do both.” See more at:  http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/c/a/2010/04/13/MNON1CTHIB.DTL

Tutt Librarian Steve Lawson Profiled in Library Journal

untitledSteve Lawson, humanities librarian at Tutt Library, was featured in Library Journal, one of the major trade magazines for librarians.
Each year the magazine runs a feature called “Movers and Shakers,” in which it profiles about 50 peer-nominated librarians who have been doing interesting things. This year, Lawson was profiled along with his friend Josh Neff, a librarian at Johnson County Library in Kansas. The two started  the Library Society of the World (LSW), which Lawson calls “a sometimes-jokey, sometimes-serious association of librarians.” LSW serves as a way for librarians to join a supportive personal and professional network online. The group has a running chat session on the FriendFeed social networking site and has raised money for the Louisville Free Public Library, which was flooded last year. Lawson and Neff also initiated the Shovers & Makers awards, a parody of the  Library Journal‘s Movers & Shakers. The Library Journal profile of Lawson (and Neff) can be viewed at:
http://www.libraryjournal.com/MS2010Inductee/2140493459.html

Dave Mason, Poem Featured on PBS NewsHour

DaveMason credit AnneLennoxEnglish Professor Dave Mason was featured on the PBS NewsHour on Thursday, April 1, and a few days earlier one of his poems was featured as the weekly poem. Mason ’78  is the author of “Ludlow,” a novel in verse that tells the story of the 1914 Ludlow Massacre in southern Colorado. It was named best poetry book of 2007 by the Contemporary Poetry Review and the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum. Other books include “The Buried Houses,” winner of the Nicholas Roerich Poetry Prize, “The Country I Remember,” winner of the Alice Fay Di Castagnola Award, and “Arrivals.” The featured weekly poem is at: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/art/blog/2010/03/weekly-poem-from-ludlow.html.
The extended interview, which includes two additional poems and three interview excerpts, is featured on PBS at: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/indepth_coverage/entertainment/poetry/

KRCC’s Andrea Chalfin Wins Award for ‘Mise en Place’ Series

Andrea Chalfin, news director for KRCC, Colorado College’s NPR-member radio station, won second place from the Colorado Broadcaster’s Association for “Mise en Place” in the “Best Mini-Documentary or Series” category.
“Mise en Place” is a monthly series based on “Colorado Proud,” which comes from the Colorado Department of Agriculture and highlights a Colorado agricultural product. Chalfin or one of KRCC News freelancers typically visits a farmer and a chef for each one, though there have been variations, including speaking with a CSU-Pueblo professor about the historical significance of squash in the region. The show also provides recipes online, one from the Colorado Department of Agriculture and one from the chef who is interviewed.
“Mise en Place” airs at 5:45 p.m. (actually, 5:44:30) the first Friday of each month, and again at 10 a.m. on Sunday, prior to the beginning of “The Splendid Table.” Be sure to tune in to KRCC 91.5 FM on Friday, April 2, for a story on herbs. To view the series, which often has extra content such as slideshows and audio, go to:
http://krccnews.org/rccnews/category/mise-en-place

Eric Perramond Publishes New Book on Mexican Cattle Ranching

Eric Perramond, associate professor of Southwest studies and environmental science, has published a new book, “Political Ecologies Perramond bookof Cattle Ranching in Northern Mexico: Private Revolutions.”
The book, published by the University of Arizona Press, examines the Río Sonora region of northern Mexico, where ranchers own anywhere from several hundred to tens of thousands of acres. Perramond evaluates management techniques, labor expenditures, gender roles, and decision-making on private ranches of varying size. By examining the economic and ecological dimensions of daily decisions made on and off the ranch, he shows that, contrary to prevailing notions, ranchers rarely collude as a class unless land titles are at issue, and that their decision-making is as varied as the landscapes they oversee.

CC’s Interdisciplinary ‘Art Bus’ Project Wins Davis Project for Peace Award

Three Colorado College students have been awarded the Davis Project for Peace for their project featuring traveling art workshops serving homeless and impoverished communities. Shire Brown ’10, an English major; Jody Joyner ’10, a studio art major; and Eddie Hazera ’11, a biology major, have received $10,000 for their collaborative project,  “Ain’t No Stoppin’ Da Bus: Traveling Art Workshops for Peace.”
The three will travel to San Francisco and Portland, Ore., for eight weeks this summer, where they will partner with existing agencies currently serving the homeless and impoverished, but which lack artistic and creative outlets. The students will live in and work out of the “Art Bus,” a retrofitted school bus, conducting workshops and presentation which incorporate interdisciplinary approaches to music, poetry, and visual art. They will conclude their stay in both cities with a final presentation, allowing the participants to display or perform their work.
Kathryn Davis, a 103-year-old philanthropist, launched the Davis Projects for Peace initiative in 2007, on her 100th birthday. The program is designed to encourage and support college students seeking to promote peace throughout the world. Each of the 100 selected projects receives $10,000 in funding.
“The competition on more than 90 campuses was keen and we congratulate the students who proposed the winning projects,” said Philip O. Geier, executive director of the Davis UWC Scholars Program.

Senior Jody Joyner Receives Watson Fellowship

Jody Joyner 10Jody Joyner ’10, a studio art major from Tucson, Ariz., has been awarded a Thomas J. Watson Foundation fellowship for her project, “The Art of Place: Where We Are.”
Joyner will travel to the United Kingdom, South Africa, Australia, Japan, and Canada to study how artists visually convey their perceptions of and connections to the natural world, how their artwork reflects knowledge of local geographies, and whether art cultivates a sense of place.
The fellowship provides for a year of independent exploration and travel outside the United States. During her year, Joyner will investigate pre-historic, traditional, and contemporary artistic traditions that incorporate nature. While immersed in unique landscapes – from the deserts of Central and Western Australia to the lowlands of the United Kingdom – she hopes to better understand how artists respond to the lands they inhabit and how their response reflects their community and culture.
Joyner is one of only 40 college seniors to receive a Watson Fellowship.
The 42nd class of Watson Fellows come from 23 states and three foreign countries, and will traverse 76 countries during their Watson year.

Tigers place 42 on SCAC fall honor roll

Slightly more than half of the CC student-athletes competing in sports sponsored by the Southern Collegiate Athletic Conference earned a spot on the SCAC Honor Roll for excellence in the classroom during the 2009 fall semester.
Forty-two of 83 Tigers were honored for posting a minimum grade-point average of 3.25 for the semester. The men’s cross country and men’s soccer teams had the most players honored with 13 apiece.
 The volleyball team had the highest percentage of athletes recognized, with nine of 16 players earning the distinction, just slightly ahead of the men’s and women’s cross country teams which had half of their rosters honored.
Ten CC student-athletes earned all-conference honors for their accomplishments in competition and the classroom – Meredith Ballard (volleyball); Jackson Brainerd (cross country); Trevor Cobb (soccer); Brian Engle (soccer); Dan Kraft (cross country); Emily Perkins (volleyball); Jordan Reese (soccer); Amy Schornack (volleyball); Andrew Wagner (cross country); and David Wilder (cross country).
“It is wonderful for the SCAC to recognize not only the athletic ability of our students but also recognize their exceptional work in the classroom,” said Director of Athletics Ken Ralph. “We have high expectation of our students and they meet the challenge at every opportunity.”
Here’s a list of Colorado College student-athletes who achieved the honor by sport:
Men’s Cross Country: Jackson Brainerd, Sean Buck, Rob Caseria, Mike Dougan, Brad Dsida, Adam Edelman, Colin Gazley, Nicholas Geyer, Dan Kraft, Ian Shiach, Andrew Wagner, Christopher Waters, David Wilder.
 Women’s Cross Country: Megan Hurster, Georgia Ivsin, Molly Lynch, Devin Nadar, Nina Roumell, Rebecca Thompson, Hannah Wear.
 Men’s Soccer: Trevor Cob, Keith Drury, Joel Dungan, Chris Ellis, Brian Engle, Ben Hancock, Anthony Hyatt, Warren King, Nick Lammers, Chris Lutz, Andrew McGhie, Jordan Reese, Dan Wright.
 Volleyball: Meredith Ballard, Annie Bernacchi, Haley Hamilton, Kameron Moding, Holli Palmer, Emily Perkins, Amy Schornack, Krista Tani, Hannah Varnell.