Posts in: Kudos

Six Named Professorships for 2011-12 Announced

Six named professorships were announced at the faculty meeting on Monday, March 14. The appointments range from two to three years, are not immediately renewable, and carry an annual stipend of $7,500 to be used for professional development purposes. The basis for selection was exemplary teaching and scholarship. The new appointments are:

Crown Family Endowed Professor for Innovation in the Arts:
Ofer Ben-Amots;
music. This is the first year for this professorship.

The A.E. and Ethel Irene Carlton Professor of Social Sciences:
Eve Grace;
political science. Juan Lindau held the Carlton Professorship from 2005-2007; Mario Montaño is the current holder.

The Christine S. Johnson Professorship in Music:
Victoria Levine;
music. Richard Agee held the first Christine S. Johnson Professorship from 2009-2010 and is the current holder.

The John Lord Knight Chair for the Study of Free Enterprise:
Vibha Kapuria-Foreman;
economics. Larry Stimpert held the John Lord Knight Chair from 2005-2007; Aju Fenn is the current holder.

The NEH Endowed Distinguished Teaching Professorship in the Humanities:
Joan Ericson
, East Asian Languages. Barry Sarchett held the NEH Professorship from 2005-2007; Tom Lindblade is the current holder.

 The Nancy Bryson Schlosser and C. William Schlosser Professorship in the Arts:
Kate Leonard
; art. Gale Murray held the Schlosser Professorship from 2006-2008; Peggy Berg is the current holder.

Steven Hayward Publishes ‘Don’t be Afraid’

Steven Hayward, Colorado College assistant professor of English, has published “Don’t be Afraid,” a darkly comic novel of adolescent anxiety featuring Jim Morrison  – not the lead singer of The Doors who died in 1971, but a chubby 17-year-old living in Cleveland Heights, Ohio. This Jim Morrison was born days after the singer’s death, and Jimmy, as most people call him, has been living a largely invisible life, overshadowed by his older brother, and his stern and unyielding engineer father. When the older brother dies, the family’s suburban life is upended and any sense of normalcy is destroyed. The book features humor and energy, as Hayward weaves a story of the undercurrents of family life and the unpredictable ways lives can unfold. “Don’t be Afraid” is published by Knopf Canada.

Brenda Soto Receives Committee Member of the Year Award

Brenda Soto, conference manager for Summer Programs, has received the Committee Member of the Year Award from the National Association of College Auxiliary Services (NACAS). The award recognizes a member who has demonstrated exceptional work on a committee that supports the NACAS mission.  The award states that Soto maintained continuity of the goals of the group by keeping the members focused on

Brenda Soto on stage with her family at The Broadmoor during the presentation of her award.

assigned tasks and exceeded the requirements of a member, making certain that all deadlines were met and tasks accomplished.
NACAS was founded in 1969 to serve as a one-stop connection for information, insight and opportunity for college auxiliary service professionals, or ancillary, non-academic campus support services.

Soto was recognized at the annual conference, held Nov. 7-10 in Colorado Springs at The Broadmoor hotel, with her and her family on stage. She will be featured in the upcoming issue of the NACAS magazine, College Services.

NACAS members include 760 U.S. institutions, 63 Canadian institutions, and five overseas institutions.

Tia Wood ’10, Geology Paraprof, Receives Award

Tia Wood ’10, a current paraprofessional in the geology department, competed with graduate and undergraduate students at the American Geophysical Union conference, held in December 2009 in San Francisco. Wood was awarded an “Outstanding Student Paper Awards” for her presentation “Anisotropy and mantle flow in the eastern Sierras Pampeanas from shear wave splitting” in the Study of the Earth’s Deep Interior category.

Four CC Seniors Present Research at Microbiology Conference

 Four Colorado College seniors, Mengyi Cao, Nguyen Nguyen, Branden Petrun, and Amber Dornbusch, presented their research at the American Society for Microbiology-Rocky Mountain Branch meeting in October at the University of Wyoming in Laramie, Wyo. Petrun won third place for the undergraduate poster presentations, and Dornbusch, current

From left to right: Nguyen Nguyen, Mengyi Cao, Amber Dornbusch (thumbs up), Phoebe Lostroh, and Branden Petrun

president of CC’s Native American Student Union, won first prize for best undergraduate poster presentation.

 The students’ collaborative research was done with associate biology professors Phoebe Lostroh and David Brown, and was funded by an Interdisciplinary Training for Undergraduates in Biological and Mathematical Sciences grant, National Science Foundation grant, various Colorado College venture grants, Natural Sciences Division Executive Committee, the biology department, the Dabb Fund, and Southwest Studies. The trip to present the research was funded by the Dean’s Advisory Committee and Lostroh’s NSF grant.

Randy Stiles Elected to EDUCAUSE Board of Directors

Randy Stiles, vice president for information management at Colorado College, has been elected to the board of EDUCAUSE, the association for information technology in higher education. Stiles, who oversees the college’s office of institutional research and planning and its information technology services, will serve a four-year term that begins this month.

Stiles’ service to EDUCAUSE includes conference presentations, several papers and prepublication reviews of studies, and consulting for the 2008 Core Data Survey revision. He also has served as a board member and chair of the Consortium of Liberal Arts Colleges and is an experienced peer reviewer and team leader for the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools.

Stiles is an American Council on Education Fellow and holds a B.S. and M.S. in aeronautical and astronautical engineering from the University of Illinois, an MBA from Northeastern University, and a Ph.D. in aeronautical engineering from Purdue University.

EDUCAUSE is a nonprofit association and the foremost community of IT leaders and professionals committed to advancing higher education. Its programs and services are focused on analysis, advocacy, community building, professional development and knowledge creation.

Recent Grad, Two Geology Faculty Members Present Research at Convention

Two Colorado College geology professors and a recent geology graduate will present their research at the 2010 annual meeting of the Geological Society of America.
Robert Jacobson ’10 will present “The Last Glacial Maximum Climate in the Southernmost Rocky Mountains”; Associate Professor Henry Fricke will present “Paleoelevation of the North American Cordillera from the late Cretaceous to Late Eocene: An Integrated Climate Model-Oxygen Isotope Approach”; and Professor Eric Leonard will present “The Post-Laramide Rocky Mountain Surface on the Front Ranges of Colorado–Its Character and Possible Causes of its Deformation.”
Approximately 6,000 scientists are expected to attend the Denver meeting, which runs from Oct. 31 through Nov. 3.

Christine Siddoway Awarded $145,260 from NSF for Research in Antarctica

Student researcher Maggie Cowling '11 and Christine Siddoway

Colorado College Geology Professor Christine Siddoway has been awarded a $145,260 grant from the National Science Foundation for geological research in West Antarctica. The grant, which begins this year, will enable Siddoway to continue her work examining “the transformation of a vast quantity of oceanic mud into lovely rose-colored granite that constitutes the continental crust of East Gondwanaland.” The process she is studying, in collaboration with University of Maryland researchers, is “analogous to distillation of clear, concentrated alcohol (grappa or single malt) from a dark, thick mash of grapes or grains.” Siddoway’s research also involves Colorado College students, on campus and off.

The work is part of an integrated research program that uses multiple approaches to explore the tectonic and climate evolution of West Antarctica. This is Siddoway’s second NSF-Polar Programs grant this year. She also was awarded $49,545 in June, which supports CC undergraduates who undertake “virtual geology” research on Antarctica while learning advanced GIS techniques in CC’s Keck GIS Learning Commons and the Antarctic Geospatial Information Center (agic.umn.edu). Colorado College alumni, parents, and friends took part in Antarctic explorations this year, as well, when Siddoway led a trip to the Antarctic Peninsula during the 2009-10 winter break.

Why it is Good to be Good? Ask John Riker

John Riker, CC professor of philosophy, has published a new book that looks at ethics and moral issues.

Yet talk about irony: He says there were many obstacles in the writing of “Why it is Good to be Good,” including the fact that his computer and all the backups were stolen just as he completed the first draft.

In the book, Riker shows how modernity’s reigning concept of the self undermines moral life and lays the basis for the epidemic of cheating that is devastating social and economic institutions. The aim of the book is to provide a compelling answer to the question of why persons living in modern society should want to adopt an ethical way of being in the world.

Riker says “Why it is Good to be Good” is written for an intelligent lay audience and should be of interest in a world “in which a few too many people think that it is in their best interest to cheat if they don’t get caught.”

The book has just been released by Jason Aronson, an imprint of Rowman and Littlefield Publishers, Inc.

“This is the book I have been wanting to write for my entire 40 years at CC,” he says. “Sometimes it takes a long time and many adventures of ideas to finally be able to think and say what you most want to.” The book began seven years ago when he was the Kohut Professor at the University of Chicago. During that year he presented his ideas both at the university and at the Chicago Institute for Psychoanalysis. “The response was so positive and strong that I set out to write the book.”

Riker also is the author of “Ethics and the Discovery of the Unconscious,” “Human Excellence and an Ecological Conception of the Psyche,” and “The Art of Ethical Thinking.”

Steve Elder Named to CASE Board of Trustees

Stephen Elder, vice president for advancement, has been elected to the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE) Board of Trustees. Elder was appointed as a trustee-at-large and will serve a three-year term, which took effect in  July.

Elder previously held positions as CC’s associate vice president for development and director of development. In addition, he served as director of development at the University of Redlands, development officer for library development at the University of Southern California, and is an active volunteer in the community.

Elder is one of 14 trustees elected to the board by CASE membership via electronic ballot. The results were announced during the association’s annual membership meeting in New York City.

CASE’s membership includes more than 3,400 colleges, universities, independent elementary and secondary schools, and educational associates in 68 countries around the world. This makes CASE one of the largest nonprofit education associations in terms of institutional membership. It serves more than 60,000 advancement professionals on the staffs of its member institutions.