Why I Was Late to Class: Too Much Volcanic Ash

Andrew ManleyColorado College’s drama in London class is experiencing more drama than might be indicated by the syllabus.
CC has 18 students enrolled in Andrew Manley’s Drama 330 course titled “Drama Away – London,” which runs April 19 through May 12. Many students, however, were late for the start of class, stranded across the United States and Europe by the volcanic ash that disrupted air traffic throughout northern Europe.
Manley says the students are scheduled to see 20 performances – mostly plays, but some dance – while studying in London. He arrived a week before the students, and has been busy trying to exchange tickets for later performances, in hopes that the students will eventually make it to class.
And it looks as though they will. By Monday, April 26, all the students but one were expected to be in London, with the last student arriving on April 27, and only one student dropping the course.
“It isn’t the end of the world,” Manley said via cell phone from London. “There are worse things than cramming in a lot of great theater.”
One of his biggest concerns was that some students may not arrive in time to see “Jerusalem,” a new comic play that is billed as “wildly original.” Their playbill also includes the “Pirates of Penzance,” “Enron,” “Spymonkey’s Moby Dick,” and several Shakespeare plays.
“People have been really, really good about working with me, and have been willing to exchange the tickets we have for other days. They realize this is a natural disaster,” Manley said.
Manley’s hope that all the students would arrive in London by the second week of the Block seems to have been granted. And it looks like most of the students will have had plenty of experience in drama by then.

Mark Fiore ’91 Wins Pulitzer Prize for Editorial Cartooning

Mark Fiore.Mark Fiore ’91, whose animated political cartoons appear on SFGate.com, the Web site of the San Francisco Chronicle, has won the Pulitzer Prize for editorial cartooning. Fiore was a political science major at Colorado College.
It is the first time since the category of editorial cartooning was created in 1922 that the Pulitzer has gone to an artist whose work does not appear in print. The Pulitzer jury said Fiore’s “biting wit, extensive research and ability to distill complex issues set a high standard for an emerging form of commentary” – online video cartooning. Like traditional editorial cartoons, his work pokes fun at politicians and societal hypocrisy, but Fiore delivers his messages in animated videos that last between 45 seconds and two minutes.
Fiore’s winning entry included “Science-gate,” which adopts the voice-over tone of a mudslinging political ad to lampoon skeptics of global warming. “Obama Interruptus” portrays the president as a focused orator despite the distracting realities of the world around him. “Credit Card Reform in Action” spoofs new credit-card regulations that are as confusing and loophole-laden as any credit card company’s signup brochure.
“What I really try to do is make it accessible, avoid the wonky and have something to say,” Fiore said. “I’d rather get people thinking a little bit (first), then laughing. But ideally, do both.” See more at:  http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/c/a/2010/04/13/MNON1CTHIB.DTL

2010 State of the Rockies Report Card Now Available Online

Photo by Steve Weaver

Layout 1The 2010 Colorado College State of the Rockies Report Card, which is dedicated to agriculture in the Rockies, is now available online. Currently in its seventh year, the annual State of the Rockies Report Card, a research project of Colorado College students and faculty, tackles complex and pressing regional issues that often have greater ramifications for the entire nation. The 132-page Report Card delves deep into the region’s agricultural history, land and water use, demographics, production, finance, and organization, providing a “foodprint” of Rockies’ agriculture. Kudos to this year’s student researchers:
* Patrick Creeden ’10, researched threats to ranching, ways to preserve ranchland, and open space
* Zoe Wick ’10, researched demographics in agriculture, American Indians, women operators in agriculture, and migrant farm labor
* Katherine Sherwood ’10, researched land in agriculture, organics and the new food economy, and the Big Thompson water project
* Emil Dimantchev ’11, researched the financial side of agriculture, subsidy allocation, and alternative agricultural enterprises
* Jayash Paudel ’10,  researched farm organization and alternative agricultural enterprises
* Russell Clarke ’10, researched agricultural production, particularly bison, dairy, and beef production
During 2009-10, Colorado College also hosted a related series of State of the Rockies Food and Agriculture panels and speakers as part of the college’s outreach activities and efforts to strengthen its engagement in the region. To view the Report Card, go to: http://www.coloradocollege.edu/StateoftheRockies/reportcard.html

Six Faculty Members Approved for Tenure, Promotion

Six Colorado College faculty members have been approved for tenure and promotion to associate professor. They are:

David BrownDavid Brown, mathematics. Brown joined Colorado College in 2004. He earned a B.A. in liberal arts from St. John’s College in Santa Fe, N.M., in 1992 and a Ph.D. in applied mathematics from the University of California, Davis, in 2001. Brown is a mathematical biologist, using mathematical models to investigate biological phenomena. His research is in population biology and ecology, with a recent foray into bacterial genetics. In his dissertation work, he studied stochastic (i.e. incorporating chance) models of the spatial spread of plant diseases. As a postdoctoral candidate, he studied the interactions between global climate change, soil food webs, and nutrient fluxes.

Emily ChanEmily Chan, psychology. Chan joined Colorado College in 2004. She earned a B.A. in psychology from Princeton University in 1997 and a
Ph.D. from the University of Michigan in 2002. Chan’s research interests include social psychology; interpersonal perception and self-presentation; prejudice and stereotyping; conflict and negotiation; judgment and decision making; evolutionary psychology; and cross-cultural social psychology.

Gail Murphy-GeissGail Murphy-Geiss, sociology. Murphy-Geiss joined Colorado College in 2004. She has a B.A. from Westminster College in Pennsylvania, a master’s of divinity from Boston University and a Ph.D. from the University of Denver and Iliff School of Theology. Her doctoral work in religion and social change culminated in a dissertation on family values among mainline Protestants. She teaches in the areas of gender, religion and family, and research methods. Her most recent research projects focus on sexual harassment in the United Methodist Church and women arrested for domestic violence. She also is interested in religion in relation to social institutions, especially law (civil religion and globalization; secularization; Supreme Court decisions on the “separation” of church and state and their social roots/consequences), church-sect-cult development, and new religious movements. Within the sociology of family, she is interested in changing family structures and domestic violence.

APS croppedAndrew Price-Smith
, political science. Price-Smith joined Colorado College in 2005. He has a B.A. from Queen’s University in Ontario, an M.A. from the University of Western Ontario, and a Ph.D. in political science from the University of Toronto, where he also served as founding director of the Project on Health and Global Affairs at the Munk Center for International Studies. Before coming to Colorado College, Price-Smith taught in the government and environmental sciences departments at the University of South Florida. He is a specialist in international health and development and biosecurity issues and the author of “The Health of Nations,” which was short-listed for the Grawemeyer Award, and “Contagion and Chaos: Disease, Ecology, and National Security in the Era of Globalization.”

Wade Roberts croppedWade Roberts, sociology. Roberts joined Colorado College in 2004. He holds a B.A. from Minnesota State University, and an M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Arizona. He currently teaches courses in political and environmental sociology, the sociology of health and medicine, and quantitative research methods. He also teaches a field-based course on development in Sierra Leone, where he is conducting a case study to examine both the institutional origins of state failure and the present organization of development efforts in a failed state context. That research builds on his continuing cross-national research on the institutional determinants of economic and social development. Roberts is particularly interested in the broad-based impacts of national family planning programs for a variety of development outcomes, and remains engaged in an ongoing project on the politics of institutional design of the U.S. welfare state, examining privatization reform efforts of Social Security and Medicare.

John WilliamsJohn Williams, history. Williams joined Colorado College in 2004. He earned a B.A. from Indiana University in history and East Asian languages and literature in 1990, an M.A. from Harvard University in East Asian regional studies in 1993, and a Ph.D. in history from the University of California, Berkeley, in 2005. His dissertation, titled “Fraud and Inquest in Jiangnan: The Politics of Examination in Early Qing China,” studied the political culture of Qing China using a civil service examination scandal as a point of departure for examining the relationship between ethnic tension, social mobility, and corruption in the early 18th-century. His research interests include 18th-century Qing political culture; Manchu aristocratic politics; the Yongzheng succession; popular religion and peasant militias in 20th-century China; and China, the Columbian exchange, and the Pacific Rim.

Tutt Librarian Steve Lawson Profiled in Library Journal

untitledSteve Lawson, humanities librarian at Tutt Library, was featured in Library Journal, one of the major trade magazines for librarians.
Each year the magazine runs a feature called “Movers and Shakers,” in which it profiles about 50 peer-nominated librarians who have been doing interesting things. This year, Lawson was profiled along with his friend Josh Neff, a librarian at Johnson County Library in Kansas. The two started  the Library Society of the World (LSW), which Lawson calls “a sometimes-jokey, sometimes-serious association of librarians.” LSW serves as a way for librarians to join a supportive personal and professional network online. The group has a running chat session on the FriendFeed social networking site and has raised money for the Louisville Free Public Library, which was flooded last year. Lawson and Neff also initiated the Shovers & Makers awards, a parody of the  Library Journal‘s Movers & Shakers. The Library Journal profile of Lawson (and Neff) can be viewed at:
http://www.libraryjournal.com/MS2010Inductee/2140493459.html

Dave Mason, Poem Featured on PBS NewsHour

DaveMason credit AnneLennoxEnglish Professor Dave Mason was featured on the PBS NewsHour on Thursday, April 1, and a few days earlier one of his poems was featured as the weekly poem. Mason ’78  is the author of “Ludlow,” a novel in verse that tells the story of the 1914 Ludlow Massacre in southern Colorado. It was named best poetry book of 2007 by the Contemporary Poetry Review and the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum. Other books include “The Buried Houses,” winner of the Nicholas Roerich Poetry Prize, “The Country I Remember,” winner of the Alice Fay Di Castagnola Award, and “Arrivals.” The featured weekly poem is at: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/art/blog/2010/03/weekly-poem-from-ludlow.html.
The extended interview, which includes two additional poems and three interview excerpts, is featured on PBS at: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/indepth_coverage/entertainment/poetry/

KRCC’s Andrea Chalfin Wins Award for ‘Mise en Place’ Series

Andrea Chalfin, news director for KRCC, Colorado College’s NPR-member radio station, won second place from the Colorado Broadcaster’s Association for “Mise en Place” in the “Best Mini-Documentary or Series” category.
“Mise en Place” is a monthly series based on “Colorado Proud,” which comes from the Colorado Department of Agriculture and highlights a Colorado agricultural product. Chalfin or one of KRCC News freelancers typically visits a farmer and a chef for each one, though there have been variations, including speaking with a CSU-Pueblo professor about the historical significance of squash in the region. The show also provides recipes online, one from the Colorado Department of Agriculture and one from the chef who is interviewed.
“Mise en Place” airs at 5:45 p.m. (actually, 5:44:30) the first Friday of each month, and again at 10 a.m. on Sunday, prior to the beginning of “The Splendid Table.” Be sure to tune in to KRCC 91.5 FM on Friday, April 2, for a story on herbs. To view the series, which often has extra content such as slideshows and audio, go to:
http://krccnews.org/rccnews/category/mise-en-place

CC Students on Alternative Spring Break Featured on Texas Television

A group of 10 Colorado College students participated in one of the alternative spring break trips sponsored by BreakOut, a student-led, student-organized association that coordinates service trips during Block and Spring breaks. The students drove four hours south to volunteer their time at a Texas animal shelter. While there, they were featured on the local television news:
http://www.newschannel10.com/global/story.asp?s=12177421

Alumni Gift Launches New Center for Intercultural Leadership

By Kristina Lizardy-Hajbi, interim director of the office of minority and international students
The office of minority and international students is pleased to share some wonderful news! Construction will begin this summer on the Ellis U. Butler Jr. Center for Intercultural Leadership (the current working title), which will be located in the ground level of the Lennox/Glass House.
Butler was an African American student who graduated from Colorado College in 1940. This past year, he passed away, leaving $150,000 to Colorado College. In 1982, when Butler’s wife, Ora Brandon Butler, died, he began giving an annual gift to the college in her name. With that gift, he wrote a moving letter highlighting “certain unpleasant experiences I went through as a negro student” while at CC; but he went on to say that he not only survived, but thrived. It was through his reflective comparisons of his “unpleasant experiences” at Colorado College with the “soul-killing racial discrimination” his wife experienced in her native state of Louisiana, that he seemed able to reconcile his own experiences, cast them in a new light and see his circumstances as challenging, but not nearly as challenging as what his wife had endured.  In a very real sense, Ellis Butler and his relationship with CC moved to a place of gratitude and forgiveness. His generous gifts throughout the years were certainly indicative of the high esteem in which he still held his alma mater.
Construction is scheduled to begin July 1 and will hopefully be completed in September. The current Student Cultural Center, which has served the needs of students over the years, will be re-designated back to the college in the interests of overall space considerations; its specific use is yet to be determined. While the current structure has served an important role over the past several years, it is currently not the most optimal space in which to host cultural programming for large groups, support student technology needs, or serve as an academic/classroom space. The newly constructed facility will accomplish this, and much more, as it offers:

  • A larger, more expansive area to hold greater numbers of people for large meetings and events but also can be divided when necessary for smaller meeting spaces.
  • Ideal study spaces—small, intimate corners for individuals or groups of students.
  • Creation of a “smart” classroom that automatically increases the usage of the building.
  • A kitchen that is twice the size of the current Student Cultural Center kitchen, providing increased counter space and a dining room table for meetings.
  • A “bar” area that will be converted into student computing portals.
  • Several unused corners and spaces for additional storage, allowing greater management of and access to student organization supplies and materials.
  • ADA accessibility through the construction of an architecturally non-invasive lift, thus ensuring complete accessibility for all students and campus members.
  • Access to the center through a separate entrance on the north side, eliminating safety issues for residents and designating the center as a public campus space. 

Naming this space after Ellis Butler, in a very appropriate way, honors the presence and experience of all minority students—past, present, and future—at Colorado College. We are excited to bring you this wonderful news and hope that you will visit the new center once it is completed. During Homecoming Weekend, we hope to host a large celebration and ribbon-cutting ceremony for current students and alumni, so please watch for details.

Eric Perramond Publishes New Book on Mexican Cattle Ranching

Eric Perramond, associate professor of Southwest studies and environmental science, has published a new book, “Political Ecologies Perramond bookof Cattle Ranching in Northern Mexico: Private Revolutions.”
The book, published by the University of Arizona Press, examines the Río Sonora region of northern Mexico, where ranchers own anywhere from several hundred to tens of thousands of acres. Perramond evaluates management techniques, labor expenditures, gender roles, and decision-making on private ranches of varying size. By examining the economic and ecological dimensions of daily decisions made on and off the ranch, he shows that, contrary to prevailing notions, ranchers rarely collude as a class unless land titles are at issue, and that their decision-making is as varied as the landscapes they oversee.