Does Your Office or Department Have What it Takes to Be “CC Fridays Best Dressed”?

by Erin Thacker, Coordinator of Sports Services

Are you an avid wearer of your black and gold CC gear each Friday?  Do you find yourself having a hard time picking out exactly what you will wear each Friday because your wardrobe is now bursting with black, gold, Colorado College or tiger print wear?  Do you walk around your office each Friday and find that everyone is donning their CC gear? 

 If this is the case, we want to see it!  During blocks II, III, and IV we will be running a photo contest to see which department on campus is “CC Fridays Best Dressed.”  Gather up your group and snap a picture of all those wearing their CC Fridays gear from now until Friday, Dec. 10. 

The winning office/department will receive a complimentary pizza and pasta party on Friday, Dec. 17.  Submit your photo by 5 p.m., Friday, Dec. 10 for your chance to win!  The winning office/department will be randomly selected the week of December 13 and will be notified prior to the 17th.  Offices/departments can submit one  photo each Friday.  Submit your photos to Erin Thacker at erin.thacker@coloradocollege.edu

Want to see what the competition is like across campus?  Take a look at the CC Tigers Athletics Facebook page and check out the “CC Fridays Best Dressed” photo album.  Weekly submitted pictures will be posted.  Let’s see which office/department on campus will be crowned “CC Fridays Best Dressed”!

Colorado College Receives $10 Million Matching Grant for Financial Aid

The Walton Family Foundation has awarded Colorado College a $10 million matching grant for high-need and first-generation students. The college’s goal is to match the grant with an additional $10 million from other donors, creating a $20 million infusion of new endowed scholarship funds over the next five years.

When this affordability initiative is fully funded, it will make significantly more scholarship funding available to students with high financial need and ensure that the college can continue to attract the best and the brightest, regardless of their ability to pay.

“This addition to our endowed financial aid will generate a dramatic and sustainable difference over time in what we can provide for prospective students,” said Richard F. Celeste, Colorado College president. “Scholarship support not only opens the door for many students who wish to attend CC, it gives them the freedom to focus more closely on their academics and pursue activities outside of class.”

Colorado College intends to use the grant to inspire other donors to join in helping to add to available scholarships. The grant comes in the final year of Celeste’s tenure; he announced in May that he will retire after June 30, 2011, completing nine years as president. Early in his presidency, he described a $300 million vision to build resources for student financial aid, faculty and campus projects.

The college awards $26 million in predominately need-based financial aid each year, with more than half of its students receiving some level of financial aid.

This is the third commitment of $10 million the college has received during Celeste’s tenure, bringing the total committed to the college since 2002 to about $180 million from alumni, parents, foundations and other college supporters.

Public Interest Fellowship Program Receives Boost with $250,000 Grant

Colorado College’s Public Interest Fellowship Program (PIFP) was awarded a $250,000 Special Opportunities grant from the David and Lucile Packard Foundation. The grant will go toward the challenge match, issued by the Randleigh Charitable Trust in January 2008, to establish a $1 million endowment for the program. The Randleigh Challenge deadline is Dec. 31, 2010, and this gift moves the college much closer to its goal of raising $500,000 for the endowment.

 The Public Interest Fellowship Program places Colorado College students and recent graduates in paid positions with Front Range public interest nonprofits in summer or yearlong fellowships. CC’s strong culture of service and civic engagement contribute to immense student interest in the program.

Among the nonprofit host organizations are the Colorado Fiscal Policy Institute, the National Council of State Legislatures, and Care and Share Food Bank. Jeff Livesay, CC sociology professor and PIFP founder, said, “PIFP is thriving. Even in these financially challenging times, an unprecedented number of nonprofit organizations have applied this fall for an unprecedented number of fellows for 2011-12, and access to PIFP fellowships has grown increasingly competitive on campus through the years.”

Four CC Seniors Present Research at Microbiology Conference

 Four Colorado College seniors, Mengyi Cao, Nguyen Nguyen, Branden Petrun, and Amber Dornbusch, presented their research at the American Society for Microbiology-Rocky Mountain Branch meeting in October at the University of Wyoming in Laramie, Wyo. Petrun won third place for the undergraduate poster presentations, and Dornbusch, current

From left to right: Nguyen Nguyen, Mengyi Cao, Amber Dornbusch (thumbs up), Phoebe Lostroh, and Branden Petrun

president of CC’s Native American Student Union, won first prize for best undergraduate poster presentation.

 The students’ collaborative research was done with associate biology professors Phoebe Lostroh and David Brown, and was funded by an Interdisciplinary Training for Undergraduates in Biological and Mathematical Sciences grant, National Science Foundation grant, various Colorado College venture grants, Natural Sciences Division Executive Committee, the biology department, the Dabb Fund, and Southwest Studies. The trip to present the research was funded by the Dean’s Advisory Committee and Lostroh’s NSF grant.

Michael O’Riley Publishes “Cinema in an Age of Terror”

Michael F. O’Riley, Colorado College associate professor of French and Italian, has recently published “Cinema in an Age of Terror: North Africa, Victimization, and Colonial History.” The book looks at how cinematic representations of colonial-era victimization inform our understanding of the contemporary age of terror. By examining works representing colonial history and the dynamics of viewership emerging from them, O’Riley reveals how the centrality of victimization in certain cinematic representations of colonial history can help one understand how the desire to occupy the victim’s position is a dangerous and blinding drive that frequently plays into the vision of terrorism.

O’Riley also is the author of “Francophone Culture and the Postcolonial Fascination with Ethnic Crimes and Colonial Aura” and “Postcolonial Haunting and Victimization: Assia Djebar’s New Novels.”

Randy Stiles Elected to EDUCAUSE Board of Directors

Randy Stiles, vice president for information management at Colorado College, has been elected to the board of EDUCAUSE, the association for information technology in higher education. Stiles, who oversees the college’s office of institutional research and planning and its information technology services, will serve a four-year term that begins this month.

Stiles’ service to EDUCAUSE includes conference presentations, several papers and prepublication reviews of studies, and consulting for the 2008 Core Data Survey revision. He also has served as a board member and chair of the Consortium of Liberal Arts Colleges and is an experienced peer reviewer and team leader for the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools.

Stiles is an American Council on Education Fellow and holds a B.S. and M.S. in aeronautical and astronautical engineering from the University of Illinois, an MBA from Northeastern University, and a Ph.D. in aeronautical engineering from Purdue University.

EDUCAUSE is a nonprofit association and the foremost community of IT leaders and professionals committed to advancing higher education. Its programs and services are focused on analysis, advocacy, community building, professional development and knowledge creation.

Board of Trustees Meeting Actions

The CC Board of Trustees met September 23-25 at the El Pomar Foundation’s Penrose House and conducted the following business.

Swore in newly elected alumni trustee Karen Pope ’70 and young alumni trustee Isabel Werner ’08 (new pilot category).

Voted to approve:

  • A bequest acceptance policy.
  • A resolution formally establishing the presidential search committee and its charge.

The trustees met with over 80 faculty, staff, and students to hear their thoughts on the college’s priorities and challenges and the desired experience and qualities of the 13th president.  Representatives of the presidential search firm, Storbeck/Pimentel, were on hand to listen as well.  In addition, the trustees participated in substantive discussion sessions on diversity and on the liberal arts in the digital age, the latter led by Susan Ashley and David Weddle; attended a reception with local alumni and community members; and dined with the new faculty members and their mentors.

Recent Grad, Two Geology Faculty Members Present Research at Convention

Two Colorado College geology professors and a recent geology graduate will present their research at the 2010 annual meeting of the Geological Society of America.
Robert Jacobson ’10 will present “The Last Glacial Maximum Climate in the Southernmost Rocky Mountains”; Associate Professor Henry Fricke will present “Paleoelevation of the North American Cordillera from the late Cretaceous to Late Eocene: An Integrated Climate Model-Oxygen Isotope Approach”; and Professor Eric Leonard will present “The Post-Laramide Rocky Mountain Surface on the Front Ranges of Colorado–Its Character and Possible Causes of its Deformation.”
Approximately 6,000 scientists are expected to attend the Denver meeting, which runs from Oct. 31 through Nov. 3.

80 Years Later, Original Shove Dedication Program Presented to CC

On Oct. 17, 1930, eight-year-old Bob Funk attended the cornerstone dedication at Shove Memorial Chapel with his mother and two brothers. Funk’s great-uncle, Horace Mitchell, was the grand master of the Masonic Lodge and, as such, was to lay the cornerstone.
Almost exactly 80 years later, on Sept. 10, 2010, Funk returned to CC and presented the original programs to Chaplain Bruce Coriell,

The dedication programs were in excellent condition, despite the turns Funk’s life had taken. He moved to New Jersey, enlisted in the Army, and served in Italy. After the war, Funk worked for duPont before enrolling in Rutgers University in 1951. He later asked a dean at Rutgers to recommend a smaller school, and the dean, learning that Funk was from Colorado Springs, told him CC was one of the best schools in the country. Funk transferred and graduated from Colorado College in 1954 at age 32.

Funk attends St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church in Denver, as does CC Trustee Bill Campbell ’67. When Funk learned Campbell was a CC alum, he asked Campbell to help him return the programs to the college. Campbell helped arrange the September visit to CC, the first time Funk had been back in decades. Funk and Campbell met with President Dick Celeste, toured the Cornerstone Arts Center, and visited Cutler Hall (where both rang the tower bell).

Funk and Campbell also went to Shove Memorial Chapel, where Funk gave the two programs to Coriell, and was presented with a book about the chapel. Funk also reviewed a collection of historical photos of the chapel ceremonies, and was able to find his mother, brothers, and himself in the front row of the guests.

Funk also recalled his impressions of the ceremony to augment the chapel’s records, including the fact that there were two dedication ceremonies. In the morning faculty members led a dedication of the four stones imported from England that are now in the lower part of the front wall of Pilgrim Chapel, located in southeast corner of Shove Chapel. The stones came from a parish church in Gatton, where a Shove ancestor served as parish priest in the 1600s; Winchester Cathedral, which inspired the architect’s design for Shove; Christ Church at Oxford; and King’s College in Cambridge.

Later that afternoon, the Masons led the program to dedicate the cornerstone, which was laid at the northwest corner of Shove Memorial Chapel. It is readily visible on the left as one enters Shove from the main, western-facing entrance. Coriell says, however, that until a few years ago, the cornerstone was obscured by heavy evergreen foliage.

Shove Memorial Chapel was completed the following year, and dedicated on Nov. 24, 1931.

Christine Siddoway Awarded $145,260 from NSF for Research in Antarctica

Student researcher Maggie Cowling '11 and Christine Siddoway

Colorado College Geology Professor Christine Siddoway has been awarded a $145,260 grant from the National Science Foundation for geological research in West Antarctica. The grant, which begins this year, will enable Siddoway to continue her work examining “the transformation of a vast quantity of oceanic mud into lovely rose-colored granite that constitutes the continental crust of East Gondwanaland.” The process she is studying, in collaboration with University of Maryland researchers, is “analogous to distillation of clear, concentrated alcohol (grappa or single malt) from a dark, thick mash of grapes or grains.” Siddoway’s research also involves Colorado College students, on campus and off.

The work is part of an integrated research program that uses multiple approaches to explore the tectonic and climate evolution of West Antarctica. This is Siddoway’s second NSF-Polar Programs grant this year. She also was awarded $49,545 in June, which supports CC undergraduates who undertake “virtual geology” research on Antarctica while learning advanced GIS techniques in CC’s Keck GIS Learning Commons and the Antarctic Geospatial Information Center (agic.umn.edu). Colorado College alumni, parents, and friends took part in Antarctic explorations this year, as well, when Siddoway led a trip to the Antarctic Peninsula during the 2009-10 winter break.