Posts in: General News

Board of Trustees Meeting Action

The Board of Trustees voted on May 20, 2011, in favor of amending the college bylaws, effective as of July 1, 2011, to add “gender identity, gender expression” as an additional category for protection in Article IX “Equal Opportunity Statement” of the bylaws and in the college’s anti-discrimination policy. The bylaws state that any such vote is not effective until expiration of a 30-day advance notice requirement of the resolution amending the bylaws. The draft resolution for the Gender Identity Bylaws Amendment was provided to the trustees at the May 21, 2011 plenary session. The 30-day advance notice requirement for the Gender Identity Bylaws Amendment has now passed. The Bylaws Amendment will now be effective on July 1, 2011.

Henry Fricke’s Research Helps Determine Dinosaur Body Temperatures

Researchers have developed a new way of determining the body temperatures of dinosaurs, providing new insights into whether dinosaurs were cold-or warm-blooded.

A paper co-written by  Associate Geology Professor Henry Fricke discusses the techniques used to determine the body temperature of animals that have been extinct for 150 million years.

By analyzing the teeth of sauropods — long-tailed, long-necked dinosaurs that were the biggest land animals ever to have lived — the scientists found that these dinosaurs were nearly as warm as most modern mammals. The paper can be viewed at: http://www.sciencemag.org/content/early/2011/06/22/science.1206196

The research was funded by the National Science Foundation’s division of earth sciences

Anne Hyde’s New Book Reassesses Critical Period of Western History

Anne Hyde, professor of history and Southwest studies, recently published “Empires, Nations, and Families: A History of the North American West, 1800-1860,” part of a five-volume series that reassesses the entire field of Western history.

The book, published by the University of Nebraska Press, makes clear that the Louisiana Purchase did not involve virgin wilderness discovered by virtuous Anglo entrepreneurs. Rather, the United States was a newcomer in a place already complicated by vying empires.

The period covered in Hyde’s book, 1800-1860, spans the fur trade, Mexican War, gold rushes, and the Overland Trail, usually very male-dominated fields of study. Hyde took a different approach, and, using letters and business records, documented the broad family associations that crossed national and ethnic boundaries. “These folks turned out to be almost entirely people of great wealth and status who loved and married across racial and cultural lines. It turns out that the West of that period is really a mixed race world that made perfect cultural and economic sense until national ideas made that cultural choice impossible in the 1850s,” Hyde said.

“Empires, Nations, and Families” reveals how, in the 1850s, immigrants to the newest region of the United States violently wrested control from Native and other powers, and how conquest and competing demands for land and resources brought about a volatile frontier culture—not at all the peace and prosperity that the new power had promised.

Worner Campus Center Undergoes Major Renovation

This artist's rendition from Shepley Bulfinch shows the new glass doors between Rastall and the Perkins Lounge area.

The Worner Campus Center, the nucleus of all campus activity, is undergoing a major renovation that will result in a more welcoming and energy-efficient building.

Most of the Worner Center improvements are focused on the main level, with the goal of transforming the dated and congested Rastall Hall into a dining area that is bright, sustainable, and easily navigated.  A portion of the north side of Rastall will be opened to the Perkins Lounge area with full light doors (see artist’s rendition), resulting in a flexible layout that can accommodate a variety of functions. Most notable of the changes will be the servery area which will be open to the dining area and will provide a variety of new food choices.

Colorado Coffee is moving inside the entrance to Benji’s, and Benji’s will be upgraded with an improved layout, which includes a new grill area, Taqueria, Sushi, Grab n’ Go coolers, flooring, furniture, and new paint. Benji’s, along with Colorado Coffee, also will be used as an additional study area in the evenings, giving students more study area options.

Energy efficiency is a major goal of the renovation, and the project is aiming for LEED certification, said Will Wise, building trades manager for facilities and project manager for this project.  Approximately 144 solar panels producing 35KW are being installed on the Worner Center roof to help offset the electrical usage in the building. An interactive flatscreen on the main floor will be devoted to monitoring energy consumption in Worner Center, he said.

The shared kitchen between Rastall and Benji’s will have the most energy-efficient dishwasher available, one which drastically reduces water use.  The new kitchen appliances are Energy Star-rated, lighting throughout the building will be upgraded to low-energy usage lights,  plumbing will be low-flow and all 25 toilets in Worner will be dual-flush.

The building’s seven air handlers, most of which date from the original 1959 building, will be reduced to five vastly more efficient ones. The air handlers take care of the building’s ventilation, heating, and air conditioning needs.

“Our goal is to reduce energy consumption by a minimum of 30 percent,” Wise said. A 30 percent reduction would result in an anticipated savings of $108,000 a year, he said. Total cost of the project is $9 million, which includes $7.7 million for construction, as well as architect, engineer, permits, and testing fees, and funds for new paint and carpeting, and other aesthetic issues, Wise said.

The project has a tight timeline of 81 days, and in order to complete the work by the August 19 deadline, two crews are working two shifts, six days a week . Bon Appetit will then have a week to get the kitchen ready before new students arrive on campus. In the meantime, the kitchen in Bemis Hall, which was remodeled last summer in preparation for the Worner Center renovation, is handing all the campus’s summer dining needs.

The project is the first major renovation of Rastall Hall since 1988, when the building took on a major transformation, and follows recommendations made in a 2009 study involving faculty, staff, students, and trustees.

Board of Trustees Meeting Actions

The CC Board of Trustees met May 19-21 on campus and conducted the following business.

 Voted to approve:

  • The Revised Faculty Handbook, to become effective July 1, 2011.  
  • Promotion to full professor for Hong Jiang in the Department of German, Russian, and East Asian Languages.
  • The transferring of $1.6 million of year-end dollars to fund the previously approved FY 2011-12 distribution from the Financial Aid Quasi Endowment for scholarships during the 2011-12 academic year.
  • Renewal of trustee Mike Lampton’s term.
  • 2011-12 trustee committee membership and chair assignments.
  • Renewal of the current trustee officers’ terms for 2011-12.
  • A resolution naming the Edith Kinney Gaylord Cornerstone Arts Center theater the “Richard F. Celeste Theatre.”

The Board celebrated with the William Jackson Palmer Society inductees; dined with President Celeste and Jacqueline Lundquist to honor them for their efforts on behalf of the college for the past nine years; and recognized outgoing trustees Liz Larned ’83, Ray Petros ’72, and Hans Utsch P’92 and P’95.

Board Votes to Name Cornerstone Venue ‘Richard F. Celeste Theatre’

The Colorado College Board of Trustees has honored President Richard F. Celeste, the 12th president of Colorado College, by naming the south theater in the Edith Kinney Gaylord Cornerstone Arts Center the “Richard F. Celeste Theatre.”

Board members passed the resolution at their May meeting, saying they wished to recognize Celeste for his “exemplary leadership as president of Colorado College for nine years; his deep passion for all things CC, including the interdisciplinary arts; and his strong commitment to building and sustaining a rich relationship between the college and its treasured community of Colorado Springs.”

The venue is the main theater in Colorado College’s iconic $33.4 million, 72,400-square-foot interdisciplinary arts center, designed by architect Antoine Predock. The building, dedicated at the October 2008 Homecoming and Parent’s Weekend, has earned a gold-level LEED certification from the U.S. Green Building Council.

The theater has been the venue for such events as lectures by author Amy Tan and U.S. Poet Laureate Kay Ryan; the first-time gathering of three cutting-edge playwrights, David Henry Hwang, Tony Kushner and Suzan-Lori Parks; the “Four Governors, One Stage” event in which former Colorado governors Dick Lamm, Roy Romer and Bill Owens gathered for a discussion moderated by Celeste, a former two-term governor of Ohio; and numerous concerts, films and dance presentations.

The theater holds a maximum of 451 seats. The venue is equipped with a variable room acoustic system with which the necessary acoustical aura can be literally dialed in with digitally controlled enhancements.

Celeste steps down as president of the college on June 30 and will be succeeded by Jill Tiefenthaler, currently the provost at Wake Forest University.

Two Philosophy Majors Present Work at Philosophy Conference

Two Colorado College philosophy majors recently presented their work at Pacific University’s Undergraduate Philosophy Conference.

Madeline Mindich ’11 presented “The Human Condition and the Ethics of Remembering It: An Essay Inspired by the ‘Concluding Unscientific Postscript’.” Joel Bock ’11 presented “Dwelling as Being at Home in the World: The Heideggerian Plight of Dwelling in Wolfe’s ‘You Can’t Go Home Again’.”

The Pacific University Undergraduate Philosophy Conference is an annual, two-day conference held each spring, attracting students from across the country and internationally. The purpose of the conference is to provide a forum for the presentation of philosophical work of undergraduates to their peers. Since 1997, almost 1,000 students from more than 240 schools have participated.

All of the participants are undergraduate students, with the exception of the annual keynote address by a renowned philosopher. Past keynote speakers have included Paul Churchland, Hilary Putnam, John Searle, Keith Lehrer, Catherine Elgin, John Perry, Hubert Dreyfus, Jerry Fodor, and Alvin Plantinga.

Dylan Nelson’s ‘Soundtrack for a Revolution’ to Air May 9 on PBS

“Soundtrack for a Revolution,” the documentary produced by Dylan Nelson, Colorado College’s artist-in-residence for film studies, will air on Monday, May 9 on PBS’s “American Experience.”

Poster for the documentary "Soundtrack for a Revolution"

The 82-minute documentary is the story of the American Civil Rights movement of the 1950s and ’60s, told through the freedom songs protesters sang on picket lines, in meetings and in jails. As current singers perform songs from the era, interviews and archival footage evoke the movement’s emotional history.

A companion to the PBS history series, “American Experience” includes features on a range of people and events in American history. Praised as the finest documentary series on television, “American Experience” brings to life the compelling stories from the past that inform our understanding of the world today.

In addition to the documentary’s debut on “American Experience,” Nelson, along with the directors, will present the film at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences on Wednesday, May 11, at its contemporary documentaries series. The program is a showcase for feature-length and short documentaries drawn from the Academy Award nominations, including the winners, as well as other important and innovative films considered by the Academy that year.

Nelson, along with her husband, Clay Haskell, teach a variety of filmmaking classes, as well as the popular off-campus class, “On Location: Hollywood.”

KASA Members Host Korean Culture Camp for Community Members

Members of CC’s Korean American Student Union (KASA) recently held a day-long Korean Culture Camp for Korean children in Colorado Springs adopted by American families.

KASA members, campers, and their families at the Korean Culture Camp. Photo by Mina Chung

The camp, held during the Block 6 break in Loomis Lounge, was attended by 15-20 children ages 3-10.

In the past, KASA has held a Korean culture night with dancing, food, and music, but this year the group wanted to tackle something different. “We wanted to do something that would last,” said YaeEun Grace Hahm ’11, a biochemistry and music major.

The event was organized by Hahm, who co-chairs KASA with Mina Chung ’13, and Alexandria Song ’12, secretary of the group. Six additional KASA members helped with the camp.

Sample of a worksheet distributed at the camp.

The day featured games, songs, food, story-telling, and crafts. The adopted children’s American families also attended, so they, too, could learn about Korean culture. “It was a good community outreach project,” said Hahm, who is from Korea originally but moved to Boulder with her family when she was 9.

The goal was to teach the adoptees about their Korean heritage because many of their American parents were not equipped with that knowledge. KASA members taught parents about Korean cuisine and how to prepare simple dishes, and gave parents recipes and samples. The children were taught simple Korean phrases, songs, and games. 

“We wanted the Korean adoptees to know that we do care, and that they have a lot of support from everyone,” Hahm said. Although she is a senior, Hahm said she is hopeful that the camp will continue. “We got a lot of ideas for other things we want to do next time,” she said. “The first time is the most difficult.”

Bowed Piano Ensemble Goes Down Under

Bowed Piano Ensemble Director Stephen Scott, nine Colorado College students, and soprano soloist Victoria Hansen will begin their third concert tour Down Under on Monday, May 16.

The ensemble, CC’s internationally recognized experimental music group, will perform in New Zealand and Australia during their two-week tour. Concerts will be held at the University of Auckland and the New Zealand School of Music in Wellington, followed by concerts in Australia at the prestigious Canberra International Music Festival, Campbelltown Arts Centre in Sydney, and Queensland Conservatorium in Brisbane.

A preview concert will be held at 7:30 p.m., Wednesday, May 11 in Packard Hall, on the Colorado College campus.

The ensemble, which performs using fish line, ribbon, mallets, and brushes on the interior components of a grand piano, was founded by Scott in 1977. Hansen, principal voice instructor at Colorado College, often performs with the group.

This year marks the 20th anniversary of the ensemble’s second Australia tour; their first trip there, in 1987, centered on a live national radio broadcast from the Sydney Opera House. The ensemble has released five recordings, appeared numerous times on network and cable television in the U.S., Europe, and Australia, and are frequently heard on live and recorded national radio broadcasts.

On the first and fifth anniversaries of the September 11 attacks, the group was featured on National Public Radio’s “Sonic Memorial Project” commemorating the people and neighborhoods of the World Trade Center, where they had performed shortly before the attacks.