CSBJ Analysis: Cultural shift part of FAC merger

CC Design Week Starts Monday

By Alana Aamodt ’18

Monday, March 6, marks the start of CC’s first Design Week, organized by the extended format art class Graphics Research Lab, taught by Kate Leonard, professor of art. “The idea behind the week is to generate an awareness of design and its role in our community,” explains Mikala Sterling ’17. Sterling and Naomi Van der Lande ’17 are the two students spearheading the week of events.

“The week will give students who are interested in this topic the chance to learn about resources on campus that work to create opportunities for students to get involved with these departments,” says Van der Lande. While CC does not have an explicit design program, this week helps demonstrate that there is no lack of involvement in design fields during and after a student’s time at CC.

Multiple open houses, showcasing the creative resources at CC, will occur throughout the week at places such as the arts and crafts studios, the Office of Communications, the costume shop in Cornerstone Arts Center, the CC Press, and Innovation at CC in the Morreale Carriage House. The Integrative Design Group, which is a club at CC, will also be involved throughout the week, and will run a trial of the Packard Projection Project on at 5:30 p.m. Thursday, in which student design work is projected onto the north wall of Packard Hall.

“The week is also meant to highlight successful CC graduates who have incorporated design into their careers, and to provide workshops and talks to encourage new conversations about how we think about design in our everyday lives,” Sterling says, referring to activities like the talk “Designing with Reclaimed Materials” with Susan Hoff ’06, and a typography workshop in the Visual Resource Center in Packard Hall.

The organizers share that they are especially excited for the Alumni Panel on Tuesday, March 7, at 4:30 p.m. in Cornerstone Screening Room, where past students will be able to share their experiences and successes in the design world since graduating from CC.

View the events schedule for CC Design Week, an event Sterling and Van der Lande hope will continue in years to come, bringing awareness and consciousness to design in the CC community.

 

Professor Goodwin Recognized for “Bars and Measures” and “#matter”

Bars and Measures

By Leah Veldhuisen ’19

The accolades continue to roll in for Idris Goodwin, assistant professor of theater and dance, with one of his most recent plays, “Bars and Measures” nominated for the Los Angeles Drama Critics Circle Award for writing. A scene from the play is pictured.

The musical score by Noah Argus has also been nominated. The Los Angeles Drama Critics Circle, started in 1969, is dedicated to critiquing, encouraging, and improving theatre in the Los Angeles area, and provides awards in many categories.

Goodwin’s play is inspired by a true story and focuses on two brothers who connect through jazz while one is in prison. Goodwin says that the play was part of a “’rolling world premiere” supported by the National New Play Network, which allowed the performance to develop progressively in four theatres around the country, ending in Los Angeles. He says receiving recognition on the final production stop is tremendously encouraging.

Goodwin’s other recent success is closer to home. His play “#matter,” which he directed and presented at CC with students Alec Sarche ’17 and Alex Farr ’17, will be produced at the Bush Theatre in London. This is a big step for Goodwin, as it will be the first time one of his works will be produced outside the United States. The production is part of a series of six short plays titled “Black Lives, Black Words,” and was one of two American works selected.

The short play focuses on the friendship of two young adults, one black and one white, when the Black Lives Matter movement causes conflict between them. Goodwin’s inspiration for the story came from his conversations about race on social media. He says that his identity and heritage have always been essential to who he is, and his conversations caused him to question old friendships, and this theme is central to “#matter.”

Beyond these two successes, Goodwin has plenty of other projects in the works. “I just released a new chapbook called ‘Inauguration’ that I co-wrote with a former student, Nico Wilkinson ’16,” he says. He also has a play currently touring Washington, D.C. schools called “From the Mouth of Monsters,” that was commissioned by the Kennedy Center and is a spinoff of Mary Shelley’s “Frankenstein.” It will be performed at the Kennedy Center March 10-12. His play “Hype Man” just won the Blue Ink playwriting award, and will have a staged reading in Chicago on May 22 at the American Blues Theater. Finally, he will be directing “Yellow Face” by David Henry Hwang during Block 8, and is working on plays with the Public Theater in New York, Seattle Children’s Theatre, and the Oregon Shakespeare Festival. He invites any students wanting to learn about writing plays to enroll in one of his courses on writing

Students Showcase Artistic Talents at Art Show Saturday

Student Art Show

By Leah Veldhuisen ’19

Saturday, March 4, CC students will have a unique opportunity to showcase their creativity at the third annual Student Art Show, sponsored by the President’s Council.

With more than 100 pieces on display, this is the largest student-run event of the year. While planning for the event is a team effort, Jaxon Rickel and Jake Walden, both fellows in the Office of the President, and six CC students are the primary organizers for this year’s show.

Caitlin Taber ’17, who has been involved in the Student Art Show since its inception, says the initial goals were to provide “the opportunity beyond art courses for students to show their work to the CC and the Colorado Springs communities,” and to “give artists a chance to gain experience selling their work in a gallery-like setting.” Both of these goals have been met, and the show has grown significantly since it started. This year’s show will be the largest ever, and has more art than the past two years combined.

According to Walden, the art on display is enormously varied. Given its growth, the exhibit will “very likely be the largest display of student art and expression ever at Colorado College, with over 100 pieces of art by over three dozen artists,” Walden says. Paintings, photography, sculpture, pottery, textiles, dance, improv performance, jazz, and movie screenings will all be on display.

Walden says that while some of the artists are studio art majors, for many of the artists, it’s just a hobby. Hanna Bautz ’17 is new to the Student Art Show, and says she’s thrilled to be able to “dabble in the arts and gain an enriching interdisciplinary perspective outside of the classroom.”

The exhibit will take place on Saturday, March 4, 6-10 p.m. in Cornerstone Arts Center.

CC Refugee Alliance and CC Democrats Offer Opportunity for Civic Engagement

By Leah Veldhuisen ’19

Recently, refugees entering the United States have been in the spotlight; national dialogue on the issue inspired the CC Refugee Alliance to collaborate with the CC Democrats to host a week of social action.

This week, Feb. 27 to March 3, students set up a phone bank in Worner Campus Center to make it easy for members of the campus community to contact elected officials to express opinions about refugees and immigration policy. The station will provide participants with all they need to call members of Congress, including phone numbers, scripts, and information for individuals who have never called a politician before.

Nicole Tan ’17, co-leader of the CC Refugee Alliance, says the group’s goal is to “act as a hub for ongoing CC engagement with refugee advocacy, creating a collaborative space for students, faculty, and staff.” Similarly, Sachin Mathur ’17 of the CC Democrats says the group is restructuring itself to be a “start-up for citizenship for CC students,” which is why they’re collaborating with CCRA to promote student involvement.

Tan says she hopes that the table in Worner will “inform participants of current policy and provide them with tools for civic engagement.” She also thinks that the experience will help students learn to become involved on any topic they’re passionate about. Tan says policies on refugees are important, and that “there are no easy answers for how to respond to the current administration’s policies,” but also that staying informed on all issues is essential.

Stay Safe: Learn Something New at CC Safety Week

CC Safety Week begins today, Monday, Feb. 27, a campus collaboration led by the Office of Campus Safety to promote safety awareness and engagement. “We want the campus community to realize that everyone has a role in keeping CC a safe place to live, learn, and work,” says Marty Toland, CSPD campus resource officer.

Monday, Feb. 27 through Friday, March 3, presentations on things like fire safety, crosswalk safety, and substance abuse will be featured. Hands-on experiences like a distracted driving simulator and a self-defense class will also be offered. Here’s a full schedule of the week’s events:

Monday, Feb. 27

Safety Week Information Tables: noon-1 p.m.
Learn about safety tips related to fitness and wellness, including how to know the right supplements to use and information about eating disorders and how to support a friend. Look for representatives from the Adam F. Press Fitness Center and Wellness Resource Center at the tables in Worner Campus Center.

Sexual Safety Program: 12:15-1:45 p.m. Worner Campus Center, Room 212
Join a discussion of safety concerns specific to sexual assault and sexual violence while on Spring Break, risk reduction techniques, party culture, and consent. Lunch will be provided. 

“How to Support Someone Struggling with an Eating Disorder” Workshop: 3-4:45pm JLK McHugh Commons
A workshop focusing on how to support a friend who may be suffering from an eating disorder.

Tuesday, Feb. 28

Safety Week Information Tables: noon-1 p.m.
Learn about crosswalk safety including laws surrounding crosswalks and tips on how to stay safe over Spring Break. Students can also learn information about eating disorders and how to support a friend. Look for representatives at the tables in Worner Campus Center.

Wednesday, March 1

Safety Week Information Tables: noon-2:30 p.m.
Learn about a variety of safety topics including the dangers of substance abuse, crosswalk safety, and staying safe during Spring Break. Look for representatives from the Wellness Resource Center and Campus Safety, and the sexual assault response coordinator at the tables in Worner Campus Center.

Safety Simulators: 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Worner Quad
Try on beer goggles and learn how being just a little bit impaired can greatly impact driving. Students can also test out the seat belt convincer to see how important it is to wear a seatbelt, and learn how to properly use a fire extinguisher.

Thursday, March 2

Self-Defense Demonstration: 11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Bemis Lounge
Check out a demonstration of the self-defense class Campus Safety instructs on campus; learn basic self-defense moves and see if you’re interested in taking the full course.

Eating Disorder Information and Screenings with ED Cares: noon-3 p.m. Worner Campus Center
Learn and ask questions about eating disorders and participate in an eating disorder screening.

Science of Substances Series — Alcohol and the Brain: 12:15-1:30 p.m., JLK McHugh Commons
Learn the truth about how certain substances affect the body from Kristi Erdal, professor of psychology. Lunch is provided.

Friday, March 3

Distracted Driver Simulator: 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Worner Quad
Learn about the hazards of driving while distracted and how to avoid being distracted behind the wheel.

Eating Disorder Information and Screenings with ED Cares: noon-3 p.m. Worner Campus Center
Learn and ask questions about eating disorders and participate in an eating disorder screening.

Find Your Voice in Musical Sing-Through Group

By Leah Veldhuisen ’19

Ever wish you could sing along with one of your favorite musicals? A new blockly event on campus provides the opportunity for the campus community to come together in song.

Organized by Alec Sarche ’17, the Musical Sing-through Group is a group of students (faculty and staff can also join if interested) meeting each block to read and sing through popular musical scripts. There is no audition process, and the meetings are open to anyone who can read and wants to sing. The atmosphere of the read-throughs will be casual, and is meant to diversify means of performance on campus. It will provide a place for students of all experience levels to read through a play in front of an informal audience of anyone who wants to listen. The MSTG held its first event, performing “Westside Story” Wednesday, Feb. 8, in Taylor Theatre.

As the artistic director for CC’s Theatre Workshop, Sarche says that the “world of theatre on campus is deep and rich and wide,” but putting on a full-scale musical is exceedingly difficult. The financial, musician, and cast requirements are a lot, and the Musical Sing-through Group will be able to “bring musicals to CC with a speed and breadth that other departments can’t match.” The only resources these performances require are people and scripts, allowing them to proceed regardless of other circumstances.

In addition to speed and ease of performance, the group’s accessibility is something Sarche is proud of. He says that he aims to provide a “completely unintimidating performance environment” for people “who may never have been onstage in their lives get to do a show in front of their friends without having to worry if they are any good.” No one will be turned away from the read-throughs.

Although the performance opportunities at CC are vast, this group is slightly different in its goals. The focus of the group is not to ever have finished, polished productions, but just to have fun “throwing yourself at a show that you either know a little of or have never heard of before,” Sarche says. Stay tuned to the Campus Calendar for MSTG events happening once a block.

CC Honored for Promoting Healthy Trees and Conservation

Campus Tree

By Leah Veldhuisen ’19

For providing both a home for a multitude of beautiful trees, and a campus community that is interested in conservation, CC has received a recent award honoring its passion, pride, and protection of trees.

The Arbor Day Foundation runs a program called Tree Campus USA that rewards campuses around the country for effectively managing their tree populations, working with the greater community to facilitate healthy urban forests, and engaging students in service opportunities related to forestry.

This year, CC has received recognition for its efforts and has been accepted into the Tree Campus USA program. To be recognized, a campus must meet the five core standards for sustainable campus forestry: Establishing a campus tree advisory committee; implementing a campus tree care program; providing dedicated annual funding for tree care; observing Arbor Day; and providing service learning opportunities. CC has met all of these standards, earning recognition from the Arbor Day Foundation.

Mike Spruce, CC’s arborist, says this recognition demonstrates “CC’s continued commitment to our trees on campus.” The college has more than 2,100 campus trees that “create the unique sense of place that is Colorado College.” Spruce plans to celebrate Arbor Day 2017, and says that “we will definitely have a community tree planting event on Armstrong Quad sometime in late April,” with more events to be announced. Colorado’s Arbor Day is April 21, and events may fall on or around that date. There will be other tree plantings on Armstrong Quad to replace trees lost in the January windstorm, says Spruce, and students, faculty, and staff volunteers will be welcome to help. More details are coming in the spring.

Check out this video students and members of the grounds crew put together during a recent cleanup project from the wind storm, promoting the tree care committee and CC’s Tree Campus US status.

Discussing the “R” Word

How we speak about racism is central to CC’s academic mission and role as a residential liberal arts college. An upcoming workshop on campus promises to provoke thoughtful and challenging discussion that allows students, faculty, and staff to come together as a community and think about essential issues.

The local chapter of the Phi Beta Kappa Society, Beta of Colorado, along with the CC Crown Faculty Center and President Jill Tiefenthaler, invite you to take part in a Phi Beta Kappa Deliberation Workshop Friday, Feb. 24, 3-4:30 p.m. in Gaylord Hall, Worner Campus Center.

Jane Murphy, associate professor of history and director of the Crown Faculty Center, is a Phi Beta Kappa member, and says, “What liberal learning is or should be and how we enact liberal learning are always relevant questions for a campus with our aspirations. The selected reading for the workshop cuts to the heart of several ongoing initiatives and questions we are already discussing. This deliberation workshop allows us to further these discussions and become a more informed community.”

The workshop will be led by Brooke Vick ’97, associate professor of psychology at Whitman College. Vick has titled this deliberation, “The ‘R’ Word: Acknowledging Racism While Valuing Diversity.” Students, faculty, and staff are all invited to attend the workshop and contribute to these discussions.

Space is limited and refreshments will be provided during the event. Please RSVP.

To download the short reading that Vick has selected and for more information about the event, check the PBK Deliberations Canvas site.

 

Fostering Dialogue and Contemplation at Coming Together Conference

By Alana Aamodt ’18

 The eighth annual Coming Together Conference, a national interfaith conference for students from across the country, is happening on campus right now, Feb. 16-19. The CC Chaplain’s Office is hosting student representatives from more than two-dozen colleges joining 53 CC students on campus this weekend, gathering to engage in spiritual discussion and practice. An exploration of what it means to be a spiritual community in an academic setting, the conference has been hosted at places such as Harvard, Princeton, and Yale Universities and the University of Puget Sound.

Colorado College Chaplain Kate Holbrook, the driving force behind the weekend’s activities, says she wants to “highlight what we do well,” referencing CC’s contribution as conference host. “The focus is the intersection between interfaith dialogue and contemplative and embodied spiritual practices,” she says.

In other words, this conference aims to expand beyond intellectual conversations and include actual engagement in various spiritual practices. In a world as fragmented as academia, Holbrook emphasizes the importance of “finding ways to connect our heads, our hearts, and our bodies,” in an effort to “integrate the whole person.” From “praying five times as day to walking barefoot in the grass,” she says this connection can be done through traditional and nontraditional practices, both of which will be featured and discussed at the conference. The result will be a weekend of diversity, intimacy, and rejuvenation.

The conference will be take place in three segments. The first focuses on interfaith engagement and contemplative education as spiritual practice, the second on rest, renewal, and the Sabbath, and the third on disruption, compassion, and social justice. To facilitate these themes, teachers and practitioners in Qigong, Five Rhythms Dance, Jewish mysticism, Sufi mysticism, and Christian monasticism will gather in various places around campus, marking the first time CC has hosted the annual Coming Together event.