CC Nordic Skiers Hit Their Stride, Qualify for Nationals

Nordic Ski Team

By Leah Veldhuisen ’19

This year, the Colorado College Nordic ski team grew immensely, and qualified the most skiers ever in school history for the Collegiate National Championships in Bend, Oregon in this month. Team captain Ines Siepmann ’18, along with Alice Oline ’18, Kelsi Anderson ’18, and Oliver Jones ’20, qualified for the National Championships by accruing points throughout the season and competing in a specific number of races.

Siepmann says the many new members of the team aided in making a great group dynamic across the team. Last year, the team had 6-10 skiers at each race, while this year a range of 13-21 CC athletes competed. Many had never skied before, meaning a lot of the team’s success was measured by progress and time spent on the snow. The most recent competition for the team was the Cowboy Chase and Laramie Loppet in Laramie, WY over the Block 5 block break. The team competed in four other races over the course of Block 5, performing well and racing hard. While it’s an exciting marker to qualify for the national competition, none of CC’s skiers will be able to attend the meet, which is taking place March 5-11. Siepmann says it is just too much school to miss on the Block Plan.

Sieppman says balancing schoolwork and skiing is generally manageable. The team trains mostly on dry land, since the closest Nordic area is in Monument and hasn’t received enough snow this year for good skiing. The next closest Nordic area is at Breckenridge, which is a two-hour drive from campus, so a lot of training happens at or near campus. According to Siepmann, the team places a lot of importance on inclusivity by providing all the necessary equipment, so “different athletes participate with the team in different ways.” Not every skier comes to all practices and meets, so students are able to tailor their participation to their school work load.

Looking ahead to next year, Siepmann says the team will get together to decide goals for the upcoming season. They have already decided to continue practicing throughout this spring, and have had a pancake breakfast for the team. Siepmann says she’s excited for the continued team bonding activities, and is also looking forward to discussing next year’s intentions and leadership.

 

Photo of Ines Siepmann ’18 (right) and Alice Oline ’18 by CJ Monson ’20.

FAC Docents Stage Play Highlighting Female Founders

Docent performance

By Montana Bass ’18

In a creative and fun-spirited performance, the docents of Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center tell the history of the FAC, contextualizing this important cultural monument and reemphasizing its continuing contemporary cultural impact. The play comes at a particularly important moment in FAC history, as soon the museum will merge with CC and begin a new era of partnership. This relationship will allow for sharing of resources between the college and the museum and revamped programming of presentations, classes, and workshops for both the college’s and Colorado Springs’ community members.

The play was adapted from a skit that was part of the FAC’s “Off the Wall” program, which was designed to familiarize children with the museum and bring its art to life. FAC staff were looking for a presentation on the museum’s founding for the popular “First Saturdays” members tour, FAC docents took on the challenge of writing and staging a 45-minute “founding women” play.

Docent Specialty Co-Chair Cindi Zenkert-Strange, a former writer and editor, scripted the play and Wendy Gray, professor of theatre at Pikes Peak Community College, directed. The new, full-length performance describes the founding of the FAC by three incredible women, Julie Penrose, Alice Bemis Taylor, and Elizabeth Sage Hare.

“We spent a lot of time researching,” said docent Kathy Olson, who plays Julie Penrose, “We wanted to add a lot of tidbits about their personal lives, really develop their personalities. These were really incredible, interesting women.” Much of the plot centers around how the three founders incorporated their three very different backgrounds and visions into one cohesive museum. All three were part of Colorado Springs’ elite, although their interests and personalities varied widely.

Julie Penrose and husband Spencer Penrose, the multimillionaire entrepreneur who developed the Broadmoor Hotel, donated their home on Dale Street to be used by the prestigious Broadmoor Art Academy. This, in turn, became the site for the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center, which incorporated a museum, art school, theatre, and music performance space under one roof. Julie Penrose’s vision for the FAC was based on her love of beauty and classical art. In contrast, Alice Bemis Taylor had an impressive Native American Southwest and Spanish Colonial art collection, so she held that as her primary interest. “She realized she couldn’t continue to house the collection in her own home,” explained Zenkert-Strange. Bemis Hall was named after Judson Moss Bemis, Alice’s father. Alice herself made significant contributions to Colorado College in the form of student scholarships and building funds. “Also, the Bemises really wanted to give back to the community, so her interest was really in making her collection more widely accessible.” Lastly, Elizabeth Sage Hare’s involvement in the New York City modern arts scene added a third vision for the museum. “She wanted everything to be modern, cutting-edge,” said Zenkert-Strange.

The docents will give their next performance on March 8 to members of the Cheyenne Mountain Newcomers Club and will perform at four other venues through May. They look forward to continuing to share this story with FAC visitors and members of the CC and Colorado Springs community. “I think we want to express what a gem we have in the building and in the collection,” adds Zenkert-Strange. “When you understand history, you can better appreciate the present, and plan for an exciting future.”

Check out events and exhibits at the FAC and look out for a CC-focused showing of the docent’s performance next block!

 

Congratulations to the Honorees of the Student Art Show

Elsa Bonyhadi ’18

Saturday, March 4, more than 300 students, staff, faculty, and community members took part in the Student Art Show, hosted by President’s Council. Over two dozen artists were featured in the largest display of student art of the year. Three jurors – Dean of Students Mike Edmonds, Professor of Art and Fine Arts Center Director Rebecca Tucker, and Fine Arts Center Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art Joy Armstrong – awarded twelve “Juror’s Choice” awards to student artists.

Photography

Hannah Seabright ’18, “Shadows in Tiananmen”

Amelia Eskenazi ’19, “Moonlight Rollaway”

Textiles

Suzanna McMurtry ’17, “Mona H.”

Jenny Welden ’18, “Nothing New Under the Sun”

Works on Paper

Amelia Atencio ’18, “Clothesline”

Abby Wigdale ’18, “Nasty Woman Pt. 1”

Painting

Liz Ellinger ’18, “Blue Noise”

Caitlin Taber ’17, “La Voyageur”

Sculpture/3D

Catherine Sinow ’17, “Nonfunctional Objects”

Brian Chen ’18, “Weathered Bronze Vase”

Special Category: Most Relevant

Elsa Bonyhadi ’18

Special Category: All-Around Awesomeness

Jenny Welden ’18

Congratulations to all CC student artists on their exceptional work, we can’t wait to see what’s next!

Contact Improv Offers an Experience for Every Body

By Montana Bass ’18

Whether you’re a seasoned dancer, elite rock-climber, campus leader, or simply looking for a new way to practice mindfulness, contact improvisation offers a way to explore the limits of one’s own physical boundaries.

Dance instructor Sue Lauther teaches the course, which will be available again in Block 7, and says it’s not just about dance or movement, but about learning to communicate with one another through touch. By doing so, “students will become more aware of the physics of their own bodies and learn how to better handle unexpected surprises or find their way through unplanned situations,” she says. Additionally, by creating physical awareness, dancers can also check in with themselves emotionally.

As Lauther explains, “Contact improv for me is another language. It’s learning to stand up for yourself. To reach out to others. To negotiate, communicate desires, joys, and disappointments. It’s good for any soul.”

It’s not just for any soul; contact is also beneficial to any body. Monica Black ’19 adds, “I’m not by any means a dancer, and it takes the onus off of figuring out something cool to do. Instead you can just focus on the energies that you and your partner are giving each other. It’s also a really vulnerable form of dance with lots of lifts and obviously very close contact, so you have to trust the other person to support your body.” This intimacy is important when our day-to-day lives often lack platonic physical touch, Lauther says. In contact improvisation, dancers learn to advocate for themselves as well as address group needs nonverbally.

As a dance major, Trevon Newmann ’18 finds benefits as well. “Contact improv has been about experimenting and adjusting. I’ve really learned how to work with a variety of people and how to give and earn trust. It’s good for getting out of your comfort zone.”

This experimentation leads dancers to a self-awareness pivotal in various aspects of their lives, and Lauther loves helping them find it. “It just delights me when somebody is amazed by the changes within themselves, doing things they didn’t think they could do,” she says.

Students, if you’d like to experience contact improvisation, you can enroll for the Block 7 course, running Tuesdays and Thursdays, 3-4:30 p.m. Or, show up in the Cossitt South Studio on the first day of Block 7. Contact Sue Lauther with any questions: slautherincolorado@gmail.com

CSBJ Analysis: Cultural shift part of FAC merger

CC Design Week Starts Monday

By Alana Aamodt ’18

Monday, March 6, marks the start of CC’s first Design Week, organized by the extended format art class Graphics Research Lab, taught by Kate Leonard, professor of art. “The idea behind the week is to generate an awareness of design and its role in our community,” explains Mikala Sterling ’17. Sterling and Naomi Van der Lande ’17 are the two students spearheading the week of events.

“The week will give students who are interested in this topic the chance to learn about resources on campus that work to create opportunities for students to get involved with these departments,” says Van der Lande. While CC does not have an explicit design program, this week helps demonstrate that there is no lack of involvement in design fields during and after a student’s time at CC.

Multiple open houses, showcasing the creative resources at CC, will occur throughout the week at places such as the arts and crafts studios, the Office of Communications, the costume shop in Cornerstone Arts Center, the CC Press, and Innovation at CC in the Morreale Carriage House. The Integrative Design Group, which is a club at CC, will also be involved throughout the week, and will run a trial of the Packard Projection Project on at 5:30 p.m. Thursday, in which student design work is projected onto the north wall of Packard Hall.

“The week is also meant to highlight successful CC graduates who have incorporated design into their careers, and to provide workshops and talks to encourage new conversations about how we think about design in our everyday lives,” Sterling says, referring to activities like the talk “Designing with Reclaimed Materials” with Susan Hoff ’06, and a typography workshop in the Visual Resource Center in Packard Hall.

The organizers share that they are especially excited for the Alumni Panel on Tuesday, March 7, at 4:30 p.m. in Cornerstone Screening Room, where past students will be able to share their experiences and successes in the design world since graduating from CC.

View the events schedule for CC Design Week, an event Sterling and Van der Lande hope will continue in years to come, bringing awareness and consciousness to design in the CC community.

 

Professor Goodwin Recognized for “Bars and Measures” and “#matter”

Bars and Measures

By Leah Veldhuisen ’19

The accolades continue to roll in for Idris Goodwin, assistant professor of theater and dance, with one of his most recent plays, “Bars and Measures” nominated for the Los Angeles Drama Critics Circle Award for writing. A scene from the play is pictured.

The musical score by Noah Argus has also been nominated. The Los Angeles Drama Critics Circle, started in 1969, is dedicated to critiquing, encouraging, and improving theatre in the Los Angeles area, and provides awards in many categories.

Goodwin’s play is inspired by a true story and focuses on two brothers who connect through jazz while one is in prison. Goodwin says that the play was part of a “’rolling world premiere” supported by the National New Play Network, which allowed the performance to develop progressively in four theatres around the country, ending in Los Angeles. He says receiving recognition on the final production stop is tremendously encouraging.

Goodwin’s other recent success is closer to home. His play “#matter,” which he directed and presented at CC with students Alec Sarche ’17 and Alex Farr ’17, will be produced at the Bush Theatre in London. This is a big step for Goodwin, as it will be the first time one of his works will be produced outside the United States. The production is part of a series of six short plays titled “Black Lives, Black Words,” and was one of two American works selected.

The short play focuses on the friendship of two young adults, one black and one white, when the Black Lives Matter movement causes conflict between them. Goodwin’s inspiration for the story came from his conversations about race on social media. He says that his identity and heritage have always been essential to who he is, and his conversations caused him to question old friendships, and this theme is central to “#matter.”

Beyond these two successes, Goodwin has plenty of other projects in the works. “I just released a new chapbook called ‘Inauguration’ that I co-wrote with a former student, Nico Wilkinson ’16,” he says. He also has a play currently touring Washington, D.C. schools called “From the Mouth of Monsters,” that was commissioned by the Kennedy Center and is a spinoff of Mary Shelley’s “Frankenstein.” It will be performed at the Kennedy Center March 10-12. His play “Hype Man” just won the Blue Ink playwriting award, and will have a staged reading in Chicago on May 22 at the American Blues Theater. Finally, he will be directing “Yellow Face” by David Henry Hwang during Block 8, and is working on plays with the Public Theater in New York, Seattle Children’s Theatre, and the Oregon Shakespeare Festival. He invites any students wanting to learn about writing plays to enroll in one of his courses on writing

Students Showcase Artistic Talents at Art Show Saturday

Student Art Show

By Leah Veldhuisen ’19

Saturday, March 4, CC students will have a unique opportunity to showcase their creativity at the third annual Student Art Show, sponsored by the President’s Council.

With more than 100 pieces on display, this is the largest student-run event of the year. While planning for the event is a team effort, Jaxon Rickel and Jake Walden, both fellows in the Office of the President, and six CC students are the primary organizers for this year’s show.

Caitlin Taber ’17, who has been involved in the Student Art Show since its inception, says the initial goals were to provide “the opportunity beyond art courses for students to show their work to the CC and the Colorado Springs communities,” and to “give artists a chance to gain experience selling their work in a gallery-like setting.” Both of these goals have been met, and the show has grown significantly since it started. This year’s show will be the largest ever, and has more art than the past two years combined.

According to Walden, the art on display is enormously varied. Given its growth, the exhibit will “very likely be the largest display of student art and expression ever at Colorado College, with over 100 pieces of art by over three dozen artists,” Walden says. Paintings, photography, sculpture, pottery, textiles, dance, improv performance, jazz, and movie screenings will all be on display.

Walden says that while some of the artists are studio art majors, for many of the artists, it’s just a hobby. Hanna Bautz ’17 is new to the Student Art Show, and says she’s thrilled to be able to “dabble in the arts and gain an enriching interdisciplinary perspective outside of the classroom.”

The exhibit will take place on Saturday, March 4, 6-10 p.m. in Cornerstone Arts Center.

CC Refugee Alliance and CC Democrats Offer Opportunity for Civic Engagement

By Leah Veldhuisen ’19

Recently, refugees entering the United States have been in the spotlight; national dialogue on the issue inspired the CC Refugee Alliance to collaborate with the CC Democrats to host a week of social action.

This week, Feb. 27 to March 3, students set up a phone bank in Worner Campus Center to make it easy for members of the campus community to contact elected officials to express opinions about refugees and immigration policy. The station will provide participants with all they need to call members of Congress, including phone numbers, scripts, and information for individuals who have never called a politician before.

Nicole Tan ’17, co-leader of the CC Refugee Alliance, says the group’s goal is to “act as a hub for ongoing CC engagement with refugee advocacy, creating a collaborative space for students, faculty, and staff.” Similarly, Sachin Mathur ’17 of the CC Democrats says the group is restructuring itself to be a “start-up for citizenship for CC students,” which is why they’re collaborating with CCRA to promote student involvement.

Tan says she hopes that the table in Worner will “inform participants of current policy and provide them with tools for civic engagement.” She also thinks that the experience will help students learn to become involved on any topic they’re passionate about. Tan says policies on refugees are important, and that “there are no easy answers for how to respond to the current administration’s policies,” but also that staying informed on all issues is essential.

Stay Safe: Learn Something New at CC Safety Week

CC Safety Week begins today, Monday, Feb. 27, a campus collaboration led by the Office of Campus Safety to promote safety awareness and engagement. “We want the campus community to realize that everyone has a role in keeping CC a safe place to live, learn, and work,” says Marty Toland, CSPD campus resource officer.

Monday, Feb. 27 through Friday, March 3, presentations on things like fire safety, crosswalk safety, and substance abuse will be featured. Hands-on experiences like a distracted driving simulator and a self-defense class will also be offered. Here’s a full schedule of the week’s events:

Monday, Feb. 27

Safety Week Information Tables: noon-1 p.m.
Learn about safety tips related to fitness and wellness, including how to know the right supplements to use and information about eating disorders and how to support a friend. Look for representatives from the Adam F. Press Fitness Center and Wellness Resource Center at the tables in Worner Campus Center.

Sexual Safety Program: 12:15-1:45 p.m. Worner Campus Center, Room 212
Join a discussion of safety concerns specific to sexual assault and sexual violence while on Spring Break, risk reduction techniques, party culture, and consent. Lunch will be provided. 

“How to Support Someone Struggling with an Eating Disorder” Workshop: 3-4:45pm JLK McHugh Commons
A workshop focusing on how to support a friend who may be suffering from an eating disorder.

Tuesday, Feb. 28

Safety Week Information Tables: noon-1 p.m.
Learn about crosswalk safety including laws surrounding crosswalks and tips on how to stay safe over Spring Break. Students can also learn information about eating disorders and how to support a friend. Look for representatives at the tables in Worner Campus Center.

Wednesday, March 1

Safety Week Information Tables: noon-2:30 p.m.
Learn about a variety of safety topics including the dangers of substance abuse, crosswalk safety, and staying safe during Spring Break. Look for representatives from the Wellness Resource Center and Campus Safety, and the sexual assault response coordinator at the tables in Worner Campus Center.

Safety Simulators: 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Worner Quad
Try on beer goggles and learn how being just a little bit impaired can greatly impact driving. Students can also test out the seat belt convincer to see how important it is to wear a seatbelt, and learn how to properly use a fire extinguisher.

Thursday, March 2

Self-Defense Demonstration: 11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Bemis Lounge
Check out a demonstration of the self-defense class Campus Safety instructs on campus; learn basic self-defense moves and see if you’re interested in taking the full course.

Eating Disorder Information and Screenings with ED Cares: noon-3 p.m. Worner Campus Center
Learn and ask questions about eating disorders and participate in an eating disorder screening.

Science of Substances Series — Alcohol and the Brain: 12:15-1:30 p.m., JLK McHugh Commons
Learn the truth about how certain substances affect the body from Kristi Erdal, professor of psychology. Lunch is provided.

Friday, March 3

Distracted Driver Simulator: 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Worner Quad
Learn about the hazards of driving while distracted and how to avoid being distracted behind the wheel.

Eating Disorder Information and Screenings with ED Cares: noon-3 p.m. Worner Campus Center
Learn and ask questions about eating disorders and participate in an eating disorder screening.