Posts in: General News

Six Faculty Members Approved for Tenure, Promotion

Six Colorado College faculty members have been approved for tenure and promotion to associate professor. They are:

David BrownDavid Brown, mathematics. Brown joined Colorado College in 2004. He earned a B.A. in liberal arts from St. John’s College in Santa Fe, N.M., in 1992 and a Ph.D. in applied mathematics from the University of California, Davis, in 2001. Brown is a mathematical biologist, using mathematical models to investigate biological phenomena. His research is in population biology and ecology, with a recent foray into bacterial genetics. In his dissertation work, he studied stochastic (i.e. incorporating chance) models of the spatial spread of plant diseases. As a postdoctoral candidate, he studied the interactions between global climate change, soil food webs, and nutrient fluxes.

Emily ChanEmily Chan, psychology. Chan joined Colorado College in 2004. She earned a B.A. in psychology from Princeton University in 1997 and a
Ph.D. from the University of Michigan in 2002. Chan’s research interests include social psychology; interpersonal perception and self-presentation; prejudice and stereotyping; conflict and negotiation; judgment and decision making; evolutionary psychology; and cross-cultural social psychology.

Gail Murphy-GeissGail Murphy-Geiss, sociology. Murphy-Geiss joined Colorado College in 2004. She has a B.A. from Westminster College in Pennsylvania, a master’s of divinity from Boston University and a Ph.D. from the University of Denver and Iliff School of Theology. Her doctoral work in religion and social change culminated in a dissertation on family values among mainline Protestants. She teaches in the areas of gender, religion and family, and research methods. Her most recent research projects focus on sexual harassment in the United Methodist Church and women arrested for domestic violence. She also is interested in religion in relation to social institutions, especially law (civil religion and globalization; secularization; Supreme Court decisions on the “separation” of church and state and their social roots/consequences), church-sect-cult development, and new religious movements. Within the sociology of family, she is interested in changing family structures and domestic violence.

APS croppedAndrew Price-Smith
, political science. Price-Smith joined Colorado College in 2005. He has a B.A. from Queen’s University in Ontario, an M.A. from the University of Western Ontario, and a Ph.D. in political science from the University of Toronto, where he also served as founding director of the Project on Health and Global Affairs at the Munk Center for International Studies. Before coming to Colorado College, Price-Smith taught in the government and environmental sciences departments at the University of South Florida. He is a specialist in international health and development and biosecurity issues and the author of “The Health of Nations,” which was short-listed for the Grawemeyer Award, and “Contagion and Chaos: Disease, Ecology, and National Security in the Era of Globalization.”

Wade Roberts croppedWade Roberts, sociology. Roberts joined Colorado College in 2004. He holds a B.A. from Minnesota State University, and an M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Arizona. He currently teaches courses in political and environmental sociology, the sociology of health and medicine, and quantitative research methods. He also teaches a field-based course on development in Sierra Leone, where he is conducting a case study to examine both the institutional origins of state failure and the present organization of development efforts in a failed state context. That research builds on his continuing cross-national research on the institutional determinants of economic and social development. Roberts is particularly interested in the broad-based impacts of national family planning programs for a variety of development outcomes, and remains engaged in an ongoing project on the politics of institutional design of the U.S. welfare state, examining privatization reform efforts of Social Security and Medicare.

John WilliamsJohn Williams, history. Williams joined Colorado College in 2004. He earned a B.A. from Indiana University in history and East Asian languages and literature in 1990, an M.A. from Harvard University in East Asian regional studies in 1993, and a Ph.D. in history from the University of California, Berkeley, in 2005. His dissertation, titled “Fraud and Inquest in Jiangnan: The Politics of Examination in Early Qing China,” studied the political culture of Qing China using a civil service examination scandal as a point of departure for examining the relationship between ethnic tension, social mobility, and corruption in the early 18th-century. His research interests include 18th-century Qing political culture; Manchu aristocratic politics; the Yongzheng succession; popular religion and peasant militias in 20th-century China; and China, the Columbian exchange, and the Pacific Rim.

Tutt Librarian Steve Lawson Profiled in Library Journal

untitledSteve Lawson, humanities librarian at Tutt Library, was featured in Library Journal, one of the major trade magazines for librarians.
Each year the magazine runs a feature called “Movers and Shakers,” in which it profiles about 50 peer-nominated librarians who have been doing interesting things. This year, Lawson was profiled along with his friend Josh Neff, a librarian at Johnson County Library in Kansas. The two started  the Library Society of the World (LSW), which Lawson calls “a sometimes-jokey, sometimes-serious association of librarians.” LSW serves as a way for librarians to join a supportive personal and professional network online. The group has a running chat session on the FriendFeed social networking site and has raised money for the Louisville Free Public Library, which was flooded last year. Lawson and Neff also initiated the Shovers & Makers awards, a parody of the  Library Journal‘s Movers & Shakers. The Library Journal profile of Lawson (and Neff) can be viewed at:
http://www.libraryjournal.com/MS2010Inductee/2140493459.html

Dave Mason, Poem Featured on PBS NewsHour

DaveMason credit AnneLennoxEnglish Professor Dave Mason was featured on the PBS NewsHour on Thursday, April 1, and a few days earlier one of his poems was featured as the weekly poem. Mason ’78  is the author of “Ludlow,” a novel in verse that tells the story of the 1914 Ludlow Massacre in southern Colorado. It was named best poetry book of 2007 by the Contemporary Poetry Review and the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum. Other books include “The Buried Houses,” winner of the Nicholas Roerich Poetry Prize, “The Country I Remember,” winner of the Alice Fay Di Castagnola Award, and “Arrivals.” The featured weekly poem is at: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/art/blog/2010/03/weekly-poem-from-ludlow.html.
The extended interview, which includes two additional poems and three interview excerpts, is featured on PBS at: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/indepth_coverage/entertainment/poetry/

KRCC’s Andrea Chalfin Wins Award for ‘Mise en Place’ Series

Andrea Chalfin, news director for KRCC, Colorado College’s NPR-member radio station, won second place from the Colorado Broadcaster’s Association for “Mise en Place” in the “Best Mini-Documentary or Series” category.
“Mise en Place” is a monthly series based on “Colorado Proud,” which comes from the Colorado Department of Agriculture and highlights a Colorado agricultural product. Chalfin or one of KRCC News freelancers typically visits a farmer and a chef for each one, though there have been variations, including speaking with a CSU-Pueblo professor about the historical significance of squash in the region. The show also provides recipes online, one from the Colorado Department of Agriculture and one from the chef who is interviewed.
“Mise en Place” airs at 5:45 p.m. (actually, 5:44:30) the first Friday of each month, and again at 10 a.m. on Sunday, prior to the beginning of “The Splendid Table.” Be sure to tune in to KRCC 91.5 FM on Friday, April 2, for a story on herbs. To view the series, which often has extra content such as slideshows and audio, go to:
http://krccnews.org/rccnews/category/mise-en-place

CC Students on Alternative Spring Break Featured on Texas Television

A group of 10 Colorado College students participated in one of the alternative spring break trips sponsored by BreakOut, a student-led, student-organized association that coordinates service trips during Block and Spring breaks. The students drove four hours south to volunteer their time at a Texas animal shelter. While there, they were featured on the local television news:
http://www.newschannel10.com/global/story.asp?s=12177421

Alumni Gift Launches New Center for Intercultural Leadership

By Kristina Lizardy-Hajbi, interim director of the office of minority and international students
The office of minority and international students is pleased to share some wonderful news! Construction will begin this summer on the Ellis U. Butler Jr. Center for Intercultural Leadership (the current working title), which will be located in the ground level of the Lennox/Glass House.
Butler was an African American student who graduated from Colorado College in 1940. This past year, he passed away, leaving $150,000 to Colorado College. In 1982, when Butler’s wife, Ora Brandon Butler, died, he began giving an annual gift to the college in her name. With that gift, he wrote a moving letter highlighting “certain unpleasant experiences I went through as a negro student” while at CC; but he went on to say that he not only survived, but thrived. It was through his reflective comparisons of his “unpleasant experiences” at Colorado College with the “soul-killing racial discrimination” his wife experienced in her native state of Louisiana, that he seemed able to reconcile his own experiences, cast them in a new light and see his circumstances as challenging, but not nearly as challenging as what his wife had endured.  In a very real sense, Ellis Butler and his relationship with CC moved to a place of gratitude and forgiveness. His generous gifts throughout the years were certainly indicative of the high esteem in which he still held his alma mater.
Construction is scheduled to begin July 1 and will hopefully be completed in September. The current Student Cultural Center, which has served the needs of students over the years, will be re-designated back to the college in the interests of overall space considerations; its specific use is yet to be determined. While the current structure has served an important role over the past several years, it is currently not the most optimal space in which to host cultural programming for large groups, support student technology needs, or serve as an academic/classroom space. The newly constructed facility will accomplish this, and much more, as it offers:

  • A larger, more expansive area to hold greater numbers of people for large meetings and events but also can be divided when necessary for smaller meeting spaces.
  • Ideal study spaces—small, intimate corners for individuals or groups of students.
  • Creation of a “smart” classroom that automatically increases the usage of the building.
  • A kitchen that is twice the size of the current Student Cultural Center kitchen, providing increased counter space and a dining room table for meetings.
  • A “bar” area that will be converted into student computing portals.
  • Several unused corners and spaces for additional storage, allowing greater management of and access to student organization supplies and materials.
  • ADA accessibility through the construction of an architecturally non-invasive lift, thus ensuring complete accessibility for all students and campus members.
  • Access to the center through a separate entrance on the north side, eliminating safety issues for residents and designating the center as a public campus space. 

Naming this space after Ellis Butler, in a very appropriate way, honors the presence and experience of all minority students—past, present, and future—at Colorado College. We are excited to bring you this wonderful news and hope that you will visit the new center once it is completed. During Homecoming Weekend, we hope to host a large celebration and ribbon-cutting ceremony for current students and alumni, so please watch for details.

Recipients of Named Professorships Announced

Colorado College has announced the recipients of the Reed, McKee, and Hochman named professorships. Each faculty member was chosen based on exemplary teaching and scholarship. They are:

  • Marc Snyder, professor of biology, is the Thomas M. McKee Professor in the Natural Sciences.
  • Paul Myrow, professor of geology, was appointed the Verner Z. Reed Professor in Natural Sciences.
  • Anne Hyde, professor of history, was awarded the William R. Hochman Endowed Chair in History.

Chili Cook-Off Stirs Up Competition, Camaraderie

By Jane Newberry, executive athletics  assistant
 March 17 heralded the celebration of not only St. Patrick’s Day, but also the Second Annual Colorado College Athletics Department Chili Cook-Off.
An enthusiastic crowd enjoyed a wide variety of chili styles, including the green chili entered by Cecelia Gonzales of facilities services, which took first prize.  Closely following was a smoky pork green chili created by Glen Luther, assistant manager of the Honnen ice rink, and a sophisticated wine-infused green chili by Darrold Hughes, athletic field specialist.
In the red chili category, Athletic Director Ken Ralph took first place.  Ann DeStefano, psychology staff assistant, was close behind with an “old-school” red chili (as described by her grandson), but believes she’ll be trying out approximately 365 new versions over the course of next year to try to come in on top.  A rookie at chili cook-offs, Budget Director Lyrae Williams had a spicy red entry that was very good.  Head soccer coach Horst Richardson and his wife, Helen, entered their famous bison chili, while Assistant Athletics Director Rick Swan brought in Beth’s Best Chili.  Jane Newberry, athletics executive assistant, brought in a red competitor “just like Mom’s.”
The competition was followed with prizes and a women’s lacrosse contest with Colorado College vs. Skidmore on Washburn field (CC defeated Skidmore College, 14-13).
“We really enjoy hosting the competition,” said Nancy Luther, athletics office assistant.  “It gives us a chance to see people from all over the campus that don’t always come to see us here.”
The athletics department sincerely hopes more people enter next year—and remember, you don’t have to enter to come over, taste chili, and have a great time.

Colorado College Accepts Gift of $13,443 from Woman’s Club

to right, Pam Bruni and Vicki Nycum, past presidents of the Woman’s Club; Jim Swanson, CC director of financial aid; Diane Bell, Woman’s Club current president; and Karen Rubinow, Woman’s Club incoming president.

Left to right, Pam Bruni and Vicki Nycum, past presidents of the Woman’s Club; Jim Swanson, CC director of financial aid; Diane Bell, Woman’s Club current president; and Karen Rubinow, Woman’s Club incoming president.

The Woman’s Club of Colorado Springs presented a check for $13,443 to Colorado College on Wednesday, March 24, in a ceremony in Slocum Hall. The money will be added to a scholarship fund the Woman’s Club established at CC in 2002.

Jim Swanson, director of financial aid, accepted the gift on behalf of Colorado College.

The Woman’s Club of Colorado Springs Scholarship Fund provides scholarships each year for two female CC students who are from Colorado Springs and who have participated in community service during high school or college.

The Woman’s Club of Colorado Springs was formed in 1902 to support the philanthropic needs of the community.

Changes Aim for Better Utilization of CC Legal and Business Resources

As a result of the substantial improvements in dining services and the bookstore, and with a desire to use college resources even more effectively, CC is reallocating oversight responsibilities for several of the college’s auxiliary functions.

In 2006 the positions of legal counsel and director of business were combined when Legal Counsel Chris Melcher joined the college. The college benefitted from having one individual with significant legal and business experience manage both areas of responsibility, and achieved immediate salary and benefit savings. Now with dining services and the bookstore on firm footing, the college will eliminate the director of business position, and redistribute oversight of auxiliaries. Effective March 22, the dining service and bookstore contracts will be managed by Vice President of Finance and Administration Robert Moore, and the college’s managed properties and insurance and risk management functions will be managed by Legal Counsel Melcher, in addition to his current legal responsibilities.

In his business role, Melcher oversaw significant transformations and improvements in the dining service and campus bookstore. In 2007-08, the college completed a competitive new food service bid process, won by Bon Appetit, which was overseen by Melcher and the Campus Food Service Committee. The change to Bon Appetit has resulted in improved food service, progress on sustainability, an improved sense of community, and a contribution from Bon Appetit of $3.5 million toward the renovation of CC’s food service facilities.

Additionally, in 2008-09, the ad hoc Bookstore Advisory Committee composed of faculty, staff, and students and supported by Melcher, spent months exploring the future of campus bookstores and textbooks, ultimately reaching a unanimous recommendation to award a contract for management of the campus bookstore to Validis (Nebraska Books). The college secured a beneficial contract, and the transition took place in Block 6.

As a result of these improvements, the college now has an opportunity to reorganize these responsibilities and make permanent the savings realized from combining the positions of legal counsel and director of business.

Robert Moore and Chris Melcher will work closely to ensure a smooth transition and look forward to the greater effectiveness these changes will produce. CC is continuing its efforts to fulfill the Board of Trustees request that the college look for ways to improve efficiencies and operations. Feel free to call either Moore or Melcher, or others in their offices, with questions regarding these changes, or go to: http://www.coloradocollege.edu/welcome/presidentsoffice/melcher.asp