Posts in: General News

Venture Grant Program Receives Equivalent of $2 Million Endowment

Allison Stewart ’12 describes her research project “Movement of Cuba: Study of Rueda de Casino Style Dance” to Jeff Keller ’91 at the Venture Grant Forum on Nov. 9.

Colorado College’s venture grant program, in which students are awarded up to $1,000 for research or other academic projects of their choosing, has received a grant from the Keller Family Foundation that will fund the program indefinitely.

The program, which will be named the Keller Family Venture Grant Program for Student Research, allows approximately 100 Colorado College students to imagine, articulate and pursue original research or an academic project of their choosing.  The Keller family will provide 100 percent of the grant funding, which runs about $100,000 each year, making the gift the equivalent of a $2 million endowment.

Jeff Keller ’91 made the announcement on behalf of his family, parents Dennis and Connie, and brother David ’95, at the 2010 Venture Grant Forum, held Nov. 9 at Colorado College.

The venture grant program was established at Colorado College in 1970. While some schools have money available for advanced research, the funds are largely for conventional academic, lab or classroom research and are not broadly available to students. At Colorado College, the spirit of the venture grants program is different: It is expected that a student’s experience will be an adventure, a departure from the norm, whether the research takes place on campus or on some far corner of the earth.

The 92 venture grants awarded during the 2009-10 academic year include:

  • Magdalena C. Reinsvold ’10, research in India for a project titled “Politics of Polio: The Resurgence and Reemergence of Poliomyelitis in India and Nigeria”
  • Anais Gude ’10, research in Beijing, China, for a project titled “Aging in Beijing: An Analysis of What it Means to Grow Old in China’s Capital”
  • Will Rosenheimer ’10, research in Guatemala for a project titled “Where Does Your Coffee Dollar Go? Democracy, Transparency and Social Consciousness of Guatemalan Fair-Trade Coffee Cooperatives”
  • Drew Thayer ’11, a project titled “The Effects of Glacial Recession on Geohazards in the Cordillera Blaca”
  • Kerry Cavanaugh ’12, a project titled “Western Medicine Practitioners in Rural Uganda”

Susan Ashley, dean of the college and the faculty, says “There are three keys to a successful venture grant. The first is to imagine the project in the right way. The second is to articulate the project vision. And the third is to execute.”

All proposals for a venture grant must have academic merit; applicants must have a faculty sponsor and the maximum grant awarded is $1,000. For more information, go to: http://www.coloradocollege.edu/resources/dean/VentureGrants/

Does Your Office or Department Have What it Takes to Be “CC Fridays Best Dressed”?

by Erin Thacker, Coordinator of Sports Services

Are you an avid wearer of your black and gold CC gear each Friday?  Do you find yourself having a hard time picking out exactly what you will wear each Friday because your wardrobe is now bursting with black, gold, Colorado College or tiger print wear?  Do you walk around your office each Friday and find that everyone is donning their CC gear? 

 If this is the case, we want to see it!  During blocks II, III, and IV we will be running a photo contest to see which department on campus is “CC Fridays Best Dressed.”  Gather up your group and snap a picture of all those wearing their CC Fridays gear from now until Friday, Dec. 10. 

The winning office/department will receive a complimentary pizza and pasta party on Friday, Dec. 17.  Submit your photo by 5 p.m., Friday, Dec. 10 for your chance to win!  The winning office/department will be randomly selected the week of December 13 and will be notified prior to the 17th.  Offices/departments can submit one  photo each Friday.  Submit your photos to Erin Thacker at erin.thacker@coloradocollege.edu

Want to see what the competition is like across campus?  Take a look at the CC Tigers Athletics Facebook page and check out the “CC Fridays Best Dressed” photo album.  Weekly submitted pictures will be posted.  Let’s see which office/department on campus will be crowned “CC Fridays Best Dressed”!

Colorado College Receives $10 Million Matching Grant for Financial Aid

The Walton Family Foundation has awarded Colorado College a $10 million matching grant for high-need and first-generation students. The college’s goal is to match the grant with an additional $10 million from other donors, creating a $20 million infusion of new endowed scholarship funds over the next five years.

When this affordability initiative is fully funded, it will make significantly more scholarship funding available to students with high financial need and ensure that the college can continue to attract the best and the brightest, regardless of their ability to pay.

“This addition to our endowed financial aid will generate a dramatic and sustainable difference over time in what we can provide for prospective students,” said Richard F. Celeste, Colorado College president. “Scholarship support not only opens the door for many students who wish to attend CC, it gives them the freedom to focus more closely on their academics and pursue activities outside of class.”

Colorado College intends to use the grant to inspire other donors to join in helping to add to available scholarships. The grant comes in the final year of Celeste’s tenure; he announced in May that he will retire after June 30, 2011, completing nine years as president. Early in his presidency, he described a $300 million vision to build resources for student financial aid, faculty and campus projects.

The college awards $26 million in predominately need-based financial aid each year, with more than half of its students receiving some level of financial aid.

This is the third commitment of $10 million the college has received during Celeste’s tenure, bringing the total committed to the college since 2002 to about $180 million from alumni, parents, foundations and other college supporters.

Public Interest Fellowship Program Receives Boost with $250,000 Grant

Colorado College’s Public Interest Fellowship Program (PIFP) was awarded a $250,000 Special Opportunities grant from the David and Lucile Packard Foundation. The grant will go toward the challenge match, issued by the Randleigh Charitable Trust in January 2008, to establish a $1 million endowment for the program. The Randleigh Challenge deadline is Dec. 31, 2010, and this gift moves the college much closer to its goal of raising $500,000 for the endowment.

 The Public Interest Fellowship Program places Colorado College students and recent graduates in paid positions with Front Range public interest nonprofits in summer or yearlong fellowships. CC’s strong culture of service and civic engagement contribute to immense student interest in the program.

Among the nonprofit host organizations are the Colorado Fiscal Policy Institute, the National Council of State Legislatures, and Care and Share Food Bank. Jeff Livesay, CC sociology professor and PIFP founder, said, “PIFP is thriving. Even in these financially challenging times, an unprecedented number of nonprofit organizations have applied this fall for an unprecedented number of fellows for 2011-12, and access to PIFP fellowships has grown increasingly competitive on campus through the years.”

Michael O’Riley Publishes “Cinema in an Age of Terror”

Michael F. O’Riley, Colorado College associate professor of French and Italian, has recently published “Cinema in an Age of Terror: North Africa, Victimization, and Colonial History.” The book looks at how cinematic representations of colonial-era victimization inform our understanding of the contemporary age of terror. By examining works representing colonial history and the dynamics of viewership emerging from them, O’Riley reveals how the centrality of victimization in certain cinematic representations of colonial history can help one understand how the desire to occupy the victim’s position is a dangerous and blinding drive that frequently plays into the vision of terrorism.

O’Riley also is the author of “Francophone Culture and the Postcolonial Fascination with Ethnic Crimes and Colonial Aura” and “Postcolonial Haunting and Victimization: Assia Djebar’s New Novels.”

Board of Trustees Meeting Actions

The CC Board of Trustees met September 23-25 at the El Pomar Foundation’s Penrose House and conducted the following business.

Swore in newly elected alumni trustee Karen Pope ’70 and young alumni trustee Isabel Werner ’08 (new pilot category).

Voted to approve:

  • A bequest acceptance policy.
  • A resolution formally establishing the presidential search committee and its charge.

The trustees met with over 80 faculty, staff, and students to hear their thoughts on the college’s priorities and challenges and the desired experience and qualities of the 13th president.  Representatives of the presidential search firm, Storbeck/Pimentel, were on hand to listen as well.  In addition, the trustees participated in substantive discussion sessions on diversity and on the liberal arts in the digital age, the latter led by Susan Ashley and David Weddle; attended a reception with local alumni and community members; and dined with the new faculty members and their mentors.

80 Years Later, Original Shove Dedication Program Presented to CC

On Oct. 17, 1930, eight-year-old Bob Funk attended the cornerstone dedication at Shove Memorial Chapel with his mother and two brothers. Funk’s great-uncle, Horace Mitchell, was the grand master of the Masonic Lodge and, as such, was to lay the cornerstone.
Almost exactly 80 years later, on Sept. 10, 2010, Funk returned to CC and presented the original programs to Chaplain Bruce Coriell,

The dedication programs were in excellent condition, despite the turns Funk’s life had taken. He moved to New Jersey, enlisted in the Army, and served in Italy. After the war, Funk worked for duPont before enrolling in Rutgers University in 1951. He later asked a dean at Rutgers to recommend a smaller school, and the dean, learning that Funk was from Colorado Springs, told him CC was one of the best schools in the country. Funk transferred and graduated from Colorado College in 1954 at age 32.

Funk attends St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church in Denver, as does CC Trustee Bill Campbell ’67. When Funk learned Campbell was a CC alum, he asked Campbell to help him return the programs to the college. Campbell helped arrange the September visit to CC, the first time Funk had been back in decades. Funk and Campbell met with President Dick Celeste, toured the Cornerstone Arts Center, and visited Cutler Hall (where both rang the tower bell).

Funk and Campbell also went to Shove Memorial Chapel, where Funk gave the two programs to Coriell, and was presented with a book about the chapel. Funk also reviewed a collection of historical photos of the chapel ceremonies, and was able to find his mother, brothers, and himself in the front row of the guests.

Funk also recalled his impressions of the ceremony to augment the chapel’s records, including the fact that there were two dedication ceremonies. In the morning faculty members led a dedication of the four stones imported from England that are now in the lower part of the front wall of Pilgrim Chapel, located in southeast corner of Shove Chapel. The stones came from a parish church in Gatton, where a Shove ancestor served as parish priest in the 1600s; Winchester Cathedral, which inspired the architect’s design for Shove; Christ Church at Oxford; and King’s College in Cambridge.

Later that afternoon, the Masons led the program to dedicate the cornerstone, which was laid at the northwest corner of Shove Memorial Chapel. It is readily visible on the left as one enters Shove from the main, western-facing entrance. Coriell says, however, that until a few years ago, the cornerstone was obscured by heavy evergreen foliage.

Shove Memorial Chapel was completed the following year, and dedicated on Nov. 24, 1931.

Square Dance Rounds Out Block 1

The beautiful Block 1 weather inspired a group of CC faculty, staff, and students to do some square dancing right in front of Tutt Science Building. The caller, Gregg Anderson, got everyone organized and dancing like a pro in no time (even though some in the group professed to have two left legs).  After 90 minutes of dancing, all dancers received A’s for the knowledge they acquired pertaining to left-hand stars, promenades, and do-sa-dos. Kudos to Emily Chan for organizing the event.

CC Gets $85,000 for Max Kade House ADA-Required Improvements

Colorado College has received an $85,000 grant from the Max Kade Foundation to support ADA-required renovations to the Max Kade House.

Renovations to the house, slated for next summer, include an ADA-accessible kitchen, shower, and lavatory, an exterior ramp, and improved signage. The grant will enable the college undertake the necessary improvements so that the Max Kade House is fully ADA-accessible and usable to people with disabilities.

The Max Kade House, the focal point for an active German cultural program, was inaugurated in 1964 as a residence for Colorado College students interested in German language and culture. Dr. Max Kade was present for the house’s opening ceremony, as his foundation made it possible for the college to purchase the century-old residence.

The Max Kade House also includes a garden house annex for small group screenings, meetings and study groups, and a garden for outdoor activities.

What’s Cooking at the Community Kitchen? A Major Renovation

Colorado College’s Community Kitchen, one of the oldest student-run community kitchens in the nation, underwent a renovation this summer. Gay Victoria, director of the Center for Service and Learning, reports that the changes include:

  • Moving the dishwashing operation out of the kitchen and into side hallway, and adding a rinse station and stainless steel countertops and backsplash
  • Two new freezers and two refrigerators for storing food
  • An under-the-counter commercial dishwasher
  • New slip-resistant flooring in the dishwashing and kitchen areas
  • The removal of all upper cabinets and the installation of stainless steel shelving
  • A new warming oven to keep hot foods hot until served
  • A cold salad server to keep salads on ice until served
  • A new commercial microwave for warming
  • New hanging pot racks to keep pots organized
  • A commercial can opener
  • Two new commercial food disposals
  • New commercial faucets in the kitchen
  • A new hand-washing sink in the kitchen
  • A new paint job, and lots of new trays, plastic glasses, coffee cups, and bowls

Check out all the changes next time you are helping at the Community Kitchen!