Posts in: Around Campus

Marlow Anderson Combines Love of Math and Scuba Diving in a New Book

When mathematics professor Marlow Anderson turned his love of scuba diving into a course, “The Mathematics of Scuba Diving,” in 2001, the possible textbooks were either too technical or too simple. “They were loathe to have even a single equation,” Anderson said of the too-simple books.  So he began to provide his own notes for the mathematical explorations course.

Those notes turned into a 197-page book, “The Physics of Scuba Diving,” just released by Nottingham University Press.  Designed for readers who aren’t necessarily interested in “hard-core” calculus, the book explains the science and math involved in avoiding decompression sickness, the painful and sometimes fatal consequence of ascending too fast from a deep dive.

Decompression sickness — the bends — results when the extra nitrogen a diver’s body has absorbed while the diver breathes compressed air at depth leaves the body too quickly as the diver ascends. The process is described mathematically using the idea of exponential decay, which takes into account changes in pressure at various depths during a dive.

Anderson describes the history, math, and science behind the rows and columns of numbers that make up dive tables, which are designed to help divers plan safe dives. From his first scuba training more than 15 years ago, dive tables provoked his curiosity.  “As a mathematician and educator, I naturally wondered:  where do these numbers come from?  They were obviously based on physics and mathematics somehow,” he writes.  “My personal quest to understand those dive tables has resulted in this book.”

Anderson, a PADI-certified assistant instructor of diving, has dived all over the world.  He recently returned from Tobago, where he encountered manta rays swimming playfully overhead during a couple of dives.

President Tiefenthaler Begins ‘Year of Listening’

As a first step in becoming part of the Colorado College community, President Jill Tiefenthaler is working with a small group representing trustees, faculty, staff, students, and alumni  to help her transition into her new role. The Temporary Transition Advisory Committee will serve through the summer. Tiefenthaler’s presidency began on July 1.

“My most important goal in the first year is to understand the college and really listen to a lot of different people,” Tiefenthaler said.

The committee will provide initial input on key stakeholders, individuals, and groups that the new president should meet, and events she should attend in her first year at Colorado College to ensure that she connects with the college and its community broadly and in meaningful ways.

“Every culture is so different,” Tiefenthaler said. “A year of listening is critical, to understand our greatest strengths, our blemishes, and our opportunities for the future.”

The transition committee members are:

Jonathan Lee, Faculty Executive Committee chair
Esther Redmount, former Faculty Executive Committee chair
Jane Murphy, assistant professor of history
Brian Linkhart, associate professor of biology
Ken Ralph, director of athletics
Randy Nehls, Staff Council co-chair
Isabel Werner ’08, young alumni trustee
Heather Carroll ’89 Alumni Association Board
Emily Fukunaga ’12, student
Logan Dahl ’12, student, CC Student Government Association
Suzanne Woolsey (ex officio), Board of Trustees chair
Working Group: Beth Brooks, director of the president’s office; Jermyn Davis, chief of staff, president’s office; Steve Elder, vice president for advancement; and Jane Turnis, director of communications

 

Colorado College Welcomes New Tenure-Track Faculty

Colorado College introduces its new tenure-track faculty. They are:

Helen Daly, Assistant Professor of Philosophy
Daly received a Ph.D. in philosophy from the University of Arizona in 2011, and holds a B.A. in philosophy and English from the University of Akron. She specializes in metaphysics and the philosophy of language.  In her dissertation, “Vagueness and Borderline Cases,” Daly clarifies the various explanations of people or things which are stuck in a state of “in-between.”  She has published in “The Oxford Handbook of Causation” and “A Companion to Metaphysics.”

Darrell KillianDarrell Killian, Assistant Professor of Biology
Killian received his B.A. in molecular biology and biochemistry from Wesleyan University, and in 2004 earned his Ph.D. in biology and developmental genetics from New York University.  He was a visiting professor at Colorado College and recently held an assistant professor position at the College of New Jersey. Much of his graduate and postdoctoral research deals with the regulation of sex-specific programmed cell death in C. Elegans.  He has been recognized by numerous grants and awards, including a Society for Developmental Biology Teaching Faculty Travel Grant and the Gladys Mateyko Award for Excellence in Biology.

Scott KrzychScott Krzych, Assistant Professor of New Media
Krzych holds a B.A. in English from California State University-Northridge, an M.A. in English from the State University of New York-Buffalo, and recently earned his Ph.D. in screen studies and English from Oklahoma State University. Krzych will be the first tenure-track professor of New Media at Colorado College. His various papers and publications address a range of subjects from digital cinema to video game studies to analysis of Glenn Beck’s television show. His dissertation examines evangelical representations of the apocalypse, including such films as “A Thief in the Night,” “Left Behind,” and “The Omega Code” and such prophecy-based cable programming as “The Hal Lindsey Report” and “Jack Van Impe Presents.”

Christina LezaChristina Leza, Assistant Professor of Anthropology
Leza earned her M.A. in linguistic anthropology from the University of California, Davis and obtained a Ph.D. from the University of Arizona in 2009, where she wrote a dissertation on indigenous activism in response to United States and Mexico border enforcement policies. She works with the Indigenous Alliance Without Borders and has won numerous grants and awards for her work. Her interests include legal and political anthropology, indigenous cultures and social movements in the Americas, and grassroots political organizing.

Corina McKendryCorina McKendry, Assistant Professor of Political Science
McKendry received her Ph.D. in politics from the University of California, Santa Cruz in June 2011. Her dissertation, “Smokestacks to Green Roofs: City Environmentalism, Green Urban Entrepreneurialism, and the Regulation of the Postindustrial City,” examines the relationship between city environmentalism and the changing role of cities in the globalized economy. She is particularly interested in how city leaders are using environmentalism to promote economic growth and the implications that this has for social equity in the green city.

Jim ParcoJim Parco, Associate Professor of Economics
Parco received a Ph.D. from the University of Arizona, where he studied under Amnon Rapoport and Nobel Laureate Vernon Smith. After completing his doctorate, he returned to the faculty of the Air Force Academy, his undergraduate alma mater, and taught courses in management, leadership, decision-making, and investments. In addition to teaching at the Academy from 1996-1999 and 2003-2007, Parco served on the National Security Council at the White House during the Clinton Administration and in a diplomatic capacity overseas with the American Embassy in Tel Aviv. In 2007, he received the Thomas Jefferson National Award from the Military Religious Freedom Foundation (MRFF) for his forthright actions in advocating for cadets at the Air Force Academy. In 2009, he was awarded the Military Officers Association of America’s (MOAA) Outstanding Faculty Award for his work at Air Command and Staff College, and in 2010, was named educator of the year.

Andrea RighiAndrea Righi, Assistant Professor of Italian
In 2004 Righi received his M.A. in North American Literatures from the University of California, San Diego. Since then he received a degree in comparative literature at the University of Bologna and a Ph.D. in Italian studies from Cornell University.  His book, “Gramsci Fell Asleep: Life, Biopolitics and Social Change in Italy,” will be published by Palgrave Macmillan.  He also has published several articles in journals and books in both English and Italian. Righi has been the recipient of several awards and fellowships, including a Fulbright Scholarship in 2004.

Habiba VaghooHabiba Vaghoo, Assistant Professor of Chemistry
Vaghoo received a B.A. in chemistry from Concordia College, where she graduated magna cum laude. She went on to pursue a Ph.D. in organic chemistry from the University of Southern California. Her dissertation explores the synthesis of organofluorine compounds. She recently served as a visiting assistant professor at The College of Wooster in Ohio. She has earned several awards and scholarships, including the Stauffer Post Doctoral Fellowship and the Harold and Lillian Moulton Graduate Fellowship for excellence in research. 

Dana WittmerDana Wittmer, Assistant Professor of Political Science
Wittmer earned her Ph.D. in political science at The Ohio State University in 2011, where she also earned her master’s degree.  She studies American politics, with specific interests in public opinion, gender and politics, public policy, and Congress. Her dissertation, “A Theory of Institutional Representation: The Link Between Political Engagement and Gendered Institutions,” focuses on public opinion about Congress as a gendered institution, paying particular attention to how these perceptions affect political engagement. Her other research interests include human trafficking within the U.S., the impact of gendered leadership on public policy, and gender and legislative effectiveness within Congress.

Shawn WomackShawn Womack, Associate Professor of Drama and Dance
Shawn comes to Colorado College from Grinnell College’s department of theatre and dance, where she was an associate professor.  In addition to her experience as performer, choreographer, and teacher, she also was founder and executive director of Dance Projects, Inc., a non-profit organization that produced contemporary dance and interdisciplinary projects. Shawn holds a B.F.A. of fine arts, ballet, from the University of Cincinnati College – Conservatory of Music, where she graduated magna cum laude, and an M.F.A. in dance from the University of California, Riverside.  Shawn will serve as chair of the drama and dance department at Colorado College.

Naomi WoodNaomi Wood, Assistant Professor of Spanish
Wood earned her M.A. from the University of Minnesota in Hispanic literature, where she specialized in Spanish-American literatures and cultures and Latin-American history. She completed her Ph.D. in Hispanic and Luso-Brazilian literatures and cultures, with a minor in feminist studies in May 2011.  Her dissertation, “Ciphering Nations: Performing Identity in Brazil and the Caribbean,” explores concepts of both cultural repression and freedom through performance arts in Latin and South American Countries.  She has published her work in The Global South and Literatura e Autoritarismo.

KRCC to Air Selections From 2010 Summer Music Festival During Fundraising Drive

KRCC will offer a special presentation featuring select pieces from the 2010 CC Summer Music Festival during their fundraising drive on Saturday, June 11. Beginning at 4 p.m., the NPR-member station will air pieces performed during last year’s festival.  Among the selections to be aired are:

  • The Overture to Die Fledermaus by Richard Strauss, performed by the Summer Music Festival Orchestra, recorded June 27, 2010.
  • Sonata for violin and piano in three movements by Edvard Grieg, performed by Scott Yoo on violin and Summer Music Festival Music Director Susan Grace on piano, recorded June 17, 2010.
  • Divertissement for oboe, clarinet, and bassoon by Ervin Schulhoff, with Anne Marie Gabrielle on oboe, Bill Jackson on Clarinet and Michael Kroth on bassoon, recorded June 10, 2010, at last year’s Colorado College Summer Music Festival.

Now in its 27th season, the Colorado College Summer Music Festival is an intensive three-week program for 45 advanced student musicians.  Festival participants work closely with CC faculty, who spend many hours coaching small ensembles and giving private lessons and master classes.  All students participate in a concert series including formal and informal chamber music concerts, five orchestra performances, including a free children’s concert, and several off-campus outreach concerts. This year’s festival runs June 6-26.

Currently, KRCC is heard in Westcliffe, Gardner, Limon, Manitou Springs, Trinidad, Buena Vista, Salida, Villa Grove, Canon City, Colorado Springs, La Junta, Raton, N.M., and globally online at www.krcc.org. Tune in to 91.5 FM to hear the broadcast.

The Back Row Takes a Front Seat on Live TV

The Back Row, CC's all-male a cappella group, appears on live TV on Dec. 9, 2010, in advance of their Winter Concert.

Brew Tasting Proves to be Popular — and Educational

Students attending the Brew Tasting in Gaylord Hall on Dec. 8.

Beer is the most widely consumed alcoholic beverage in the world, and few would argue that it is also the most popular alcoholic beverage on college campuses.

That’s why a group of CC students recently organized a beer tasting dinner, in which a variety of beers were paired with accompanying foods.

“Because of the relationship between alcohol abuse and sexual safety, I find it important to have events on campus that foster a safer drinking environment,” said Nathan Brand ’11, who was instrumental in organizing the Dec. 8 Brew Tasting, which was held in Gaylord Hall and attended by 60 guests. “While some campus events already do serve alcohol for students to enjoy, they do not incorporate an educational component. The purpose of events such as Brew Tasting is to teach people how to enjoy alcohol as an art form, rather than just simply as a means to an end.”

“The event was an opportunity for students over 21 to experience alcohol in a mature setting, in which they learned about beer and beer-food pairings.  Students also had the opportunity to interact with staff member in a social setting,” said Heather Horton, CC’s sexual assault response coordinator.

Brand, who was last year’s co-chair of SOSS (Student Organization for Sexual Safety) enlisted seniors Nick Hawks and Chris Shambaugh to lead the event, which featured eight craft brews.

Hawks, who writes the popular Brew-HaHa column in the Catalyst, said one of the goals of the Brew Tasting was to educate fellow students so they would know and appreciated what they were drinking.

He and Shambaugh selected craft beers in a variety of categories to complement a five-course meal that started with grapes and cheese and included a Caesar salad, red vegetarian chili, lamb chops, and tiramisu for dessert. “We wanted students to sip slowly and learn to identify the flavors they were experiencing. We asked them to describe and label what they were tasting,” Hawks said.

He labeled the evening a success, adding that students came up to him after the event, saying they had no idea beer could have so much complexity. The evening also had an inferred lesson, he said, which was that beer can be sipped and enjoyed; that drinking doesn’t have to lead to drunkenness, and that imbibing with a meal is a form of drinking that is an enjoyable way to consume alcohol.

The event was sponsored by Horton’s office, along with SOSS and Campus Activities.  Hawks said there are plans to hold another Brew Tasting in the spring semester, with a completely different line-up of beers. “There’s just so much great beer out there that I want to introduce people to,” he said.

Tipi on Cutler Quad Helps Raise NASU Profile on Campus

CC’s Native American Student Union (NASU) recently erected a huge tipi on Cutler Quad in honor of National American Indian Heritage Month. By doing so, the group also hopes to raise the profile of the student organization on campus, said sophomore Carl Slater, who, along with senior Amber Dornbusch, co-chairs NASU.

The Arapahoe-style tipi, which featured 27-foot tall lodge pole pines and measured 18 feet in diameter, was  in place Nov. 17 through Nov. 24. The selection of an Arapahoe tipi was intentional, Slater said, as Arapahoe Indians frequented the area. “We wanted to make people aware that long before CC existed, there were tipis here,” he said.

Saraiya Ruano '13, left, and Guojun Lee, '14, play Native American flutes outside the tipi on Cutler Quad.

The tipi was in use throughout the week – many students stopped by to visit or to read the informational sign posted in front. At least one student camped in the tipi overnight. Others played music in it. A s’more fest was held over the weekend, and a steady stream of students dropped in for s’mores, which were made over a small brazier in the center of the tipi.

 “It was a great event. It enabled the members of NASU to share with non-native students the pride they have in their culture,” said Suzi Nishida, an advisor to the group.

At the closing ceremony on Wednesday, Nov. 23, Slater spoke, Joseph Grimely ’13 from Cochiti Pueblo in the Navajo Nation led the group in a closing prayer, and Guojun Lee ’14 and Saraiya Ruano ’13 played Native American flutes.

The tipi is new this year, and was made possible by a cooperative effort across campus. “It really brought staff and students together,” Nishida said. Contributors included the carpentry, purchasing, and grounds departments in facilities services; the chaplains’ office; NASU, campus activities, student minority life, the IDEA Space, and the McHugh family. Dan Crossey and Cecelia Gonzales, both of facilities services, were instrumental in getting the tipi up, Nishida said.

Native American Student Union was established as the Native American Student Association at in 1960 and celebrates Native American peoples and cultures.

Get to Know: The Class of 2014

Nearly 5,000 students applied to Colorado College this year. The Class of 2014 brings a wealth of knowledge, experience and talent to the campus. The incoming class features:

  • Students who speak 21 different languages, including Persian, Telugu, and Greek.
  • 46 editors of student publications.
  • An internationally recognized Irish step dancer.
  •  Eight nationally ranked competitors, including a three-time national champion in alpine skiing, a national gold jump rope medalist,  and an equestrian gold medalist.
  • Two members who coached Special Olympic athletes.
  • 18 members who have finished screenplays, 13 of which were converted into shows.
  •  A student who earned more than $40,000 from a self-started ultimate Frisbee T-shirt company.
  •  A two-time grand prize winner in a national gingerbread competition.
  • 42 founders of campus organizations, including book clubs, newspapers, animal rights associations, and breakfast clubs.
  • An ultra-distance runner who finished the Leadville Trail 100, a 100-mile course in the Rocky Mountains with its lowest elevation falling just above 9,000 feet.
  • A variety of leaders, including 17 student government presidents, 24 service organization leaders, and 75 heads of school groups, ranging from Quidditch Club to philosophy societies to ski and snowboard groups.

Get to Know: Aaron Cohick

Aaron Cohick, proprietor of NewLights Press, an independent publisher of experimental literature and artists’ books, has been named the new printer at The Press at Colorado College.

He received a BFA in painting from the Maryland Institute College of Art in 2002, and an MFA in printmaking from Arizona State University in 2007. For the past few years he has worked as a commercial letterpress printer in San Francisco and taught at the San Francisco Center for the Book.

Cohick, a native of Pennsylvania, says he has always had a dual interest in writing and the visual arts, but never knew how to put them together until he took a bookbinding class. “We worked with type-setting, binding, letter press printing, and screen printing, and I realized that was it – that was what I wanted to do,” he says.

Cohick hopes to make the experience, knowledge, and equipment at The Press at CC more broadly accessible to students. “I’d like them to discover The Press early on, and not just their senior year,” he says. “A year is not enough time to learn this.” He also hopes to increase the number of publications produced by The Press, and to increase its visibility, both nationally and internationally.

Cohick enjoys the slow, repetitive, careful – almost meditative – process of printmaking. “All aspects of it are very appealing,” he says.

Cohick takes over from Colin Frazer ’02, who ran The Press from 2006 until his departure this summer for the Rhode Island School of Design, where he will pursue an MFA in design. Frazer, a physics major, became interested in The Press during his senior year when he took a printmaking class with Professor Kate Leonard.

Founded in 1977, Colorado College’s fine letterpress has produced many superb works of art that are now features in collections at Yale University, Harvard University, Chicago’s Newberry Library,  the Victoria and Albert Museum and the Rijksmuseum, to name a few.

The Press at Colorado College, now housed in Taylor Hall, got its start when Jim Trissel, a former CC professor of studio art and art history, was enlisted to help transport an old press to the campus in the mid-1970s. Trissel, whose father and grandfather had both worked as printers, took a sabbatical from 1977-78 to learn the technology, design, and history of printmaking, and later began to collect classic typefaces.

Over the years, The Press at Colorado College has published notable books including a book produced on commission from the Arts for Nature Trust of England as a 75th birthday gift for Prince Phillip, Duke of Edinburgh; several books collected by the Newberry Library in Chicago; and three publications included in the New York Public Library exhibits “Seventy from the Seventies,” “Eighty from the Eighties,” and “Ninety from the Nineties.”

Happy holidays from CC

Happy holidays from CC

Happy holidays from Colorado College! (click image to play video)